Education

The College Audition Process: Conquering Fear with Confidence. by Nancy Stagnitta

Posted by on Apr 1, 2017 in April 2017, Articles, Education, Featured, Issues | 0 comments

The College Audition Process: Conquering Fear with Confidence.  by Nancy Stagnitta

For a young flutist preparing to audition for college and conservatory admission (not to mention what lies beyond!), the enormity of the process can seem to loom larger than life.  From choosing the schools and teachers with the strongest potential to be the best fit, to choosing repertoire and honing the skills and artistic voice necessary to perform convincingly, to creating successful pre-screening audition recordings and preparing live audition repertoire, to traveling for auditions and waiting for admission and financial aid decisions to arrive, and finally, to making that final leap of faith and committing to a school, the journey is both rich and arduous.  It requires stamina and fortitude, focus and dedication, and most importantly, a positive outlook, a sense of humor, firm trust in one’s preparation and abilities, and unwavering confidence.  Even the most thoroughly prepared student can become distracted by doubt and by thoughts such as, “my future will be determined by this five-minute audition” - thus easily erasing the hard-won progress and enthusiasm achieved in the practice room.   With thoughtful care in cultivating a positive mindset and effective practice habits, these feelings of doubt and fear can be replaced by genuine excitement and healthy confidence. Setting Your Golden Standard Having an accurate, steeped-in-reality view of your current level of ability at the time of an audition is crucial to bringing a confident approach.  As one Interlochen student wisely reported upon returning from a college audition tour, “When you walk into an audition, you can’t be better than you are.”  Indeed, setting your standard out of the reach of your current ability, especially just as you step foot into in audition, has wickedly strong potential to set you up to feel that you have failed to deliver your very best, because you were focused instead on the alternative, out-of-reach “very best” you suddenly strived for in the moment.  Performing well under the pressure of an expectation that can’t be met is debilitating for almost any player.  Certainly, though, the excitement and magic of a live performance can serve to elevate your “gold standard” if you let it, and if your level of preparation allows for it.  And of course, setting a standard that is too low will keep you from achieving your best in demonstrating all you have accomplished in your preparation.  The adage “there is no substitute for practice” is glaringly true and apparent in an audition!  Know your strengths, fortify any weaknesses through mindful practice, and trust your work. Taking Control of the Room An audition does not begin with the first note, but rather, it starts with the presence and attitude you bring when you first step into the room.  This includes your body posture, your stride and sense of purpose, your facial expression, eye contact, and your overall sense of comfort, enthusiasm, and confidence.  Strive to be yourself - your best self - and to remember that through your hard work and dedication, you have earned the right to feel positive and strong. Your Inner Voices are Talking….  (what are they telling you?) Fostering an effective mindset for successful auditions takes time, thoughtful reflection, and practice.  Confidence is so frequently derailed by those unwelcome voices that can suddenly come to mind: “I’m not prepared. I’m not “good enough.”  So-and-so sounds better.  So-and-so...

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Articulation. By Dr. Cate Hummel

Posted by on Feb 1, 2017 in Articles, Education, Featured, February 2017, Issues | 1 comment

Articulation. By Dr. Cate Hummel

If you say about someone that they are articulate, you mean that they are good at making their ideas clear. From this we can infer that “articulation” in music also means that it is a tool that makes musical ideas clear. Another concept we hear a lot about when we go to music school is that the basic elements of music are repetition and contrast. Articulation plays a big role in creating the perception of both repetition and contrast for our listeners. It then stands to reason that our job as interpreters and performers is to define the articulation as clearly as possible. With good articulation we can define the character of a piece, communicate style and emotion. How can we use articulation as an essential element in our musical toolbox? First we have to really understand the nature of articulation. Is it just tonguing; single, double, triple tonguing? Tonguing is certainly one of the first things we learn playing the flute, along with shaping the aperture and making a sound. According to Thomas Nyfenger, tonguing was merely the finishing touch to articulation, but not the actual articulation itself. The actual articulation is based on using the breath, and shaping and directing the air stream at the blowing edge. The tongue merely provides a clear ictus to the note being articulated. One of my favorite Nyfenger quips is that, “tonguing is the anti-tone.” Articulation is how we define style, character and phrasing. There are two basic kinds of blowing, legato and staccato, and as many variations of each as you have imagination. These two types of articulation have to be cultivated separately in order to clearly understand what is required to produce them. For legato blowing, there is no better exercise than Moyse long tones (as in De la Sonorité and Trevor Wye’s Practice Book 1) in groups of two, three, four and five notes in either direction, descending to spread the richness into the low register or ascending to learn to keep the sound open and full of life. Pay particular attention to space between the notes, the continuity of the air as your fingers move. There is a physical and visceral feeling, pushing from your core, when the notes are well connected. Practice pushing through larger intervals as well, both up and down. Also note the difference in how it feels for upward versus downward intervals. Play long, lyrical melodies from the literature. Some of my favorites are the opening of the slow movement of the Ibert Concerto, the slow movement of the Poulenc Sonata, the opening of the Büsser Prelude and Scherzo, the first melody of the slow movement in the Beethoven Violin Concerto, Fauré Pavane, etc. Staccato blowing is more overtly athletic and requires a different kind of effort than legato blowing. The first question to ask yourself is if you can play staccato without tonguing. Can you control how you shape and direct the air stream so the ictus is as clear as humanly possible without using the tongue for definition? You really have to study your focus, placement and the forcefulness of the puff of air you blow. If you can do this, then try the same thing with just a little bit of tongue for definition. The granddaddy of all staccato blowing...

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21st Century Connections

Posted by on Apr 1, 2016 in April 2016, Articles, Education, Featured | 0 comments

21st Century Connections

21st Century Connections by Lindsay Bryden The 21st century has seen many exciting developments in its short 15 years. The new generation of flutists has grown up with extended techniques, modern music is at a pivotal time between experimental and contemporary classical, and conservatories are filled to the brim with outstanding pedagogues closely connected to those who propelled the legacy of the flute in the mid-20th century. However, the greatest achievement of the 21st century is the advancement of technology and the worldwide web. Through social media, musicians have direct access to audiences, colleagues and teachers. It is easy to advertise performances and self-promote through the online sharing of recordings and compositions. With the right marketing, people can get a multitude of followers on websites like Twitter or Facebook. This means thousands of potential listeners who can share these promotions through their own accounts. Online networking also gives the ability to message friends and colleagues directly to organise rehearsals, initiate collaborations, and contact composers to commission pieces, adding to the repertoire. Social media isn’t simply for aspiring professionals; this platform is key in the lives of famous performers, orchestras, professors, composers and conductors. These websites are most commonly used for posting recordings and videos, advertising concerts, and sharing information on masterclasses, courses and teaching philosophies.  YouTube is the most well known website besides Google. Since it was first activated in February 2005, it has attracted millions of hits per year. Professors frequently tell students to go on YouTube to listen to repertoire they are learning, and is the go-to source for watching orchestral performances when preparing for auditions. It is used for promoting personal recordings and seeking criticism from the online community. Videos of masterclasses or instructional material on new techniques are readily available, allowing flutists to learn even when not undertaking studies. Applications such as Skype and FaceTime, created for keeping relationshiops alive across the globe, are useful to the modern-day flutist. They enable connecting with potential ensemble partners, job interviews for teaching positions, and – when coupled with the right microphomne – orchestra auditions. Consultation lessons with professors at conservatories of interest can now happen trans-continentally without paying an exorbitant amount for flights. With online sources like the International Music Score Library Project (IMSLP), flutists have free access to sheet music that are out of copyright. Getting scores for courses, auditions and orchestral work through sites like this means flutists can properly prepare for any situation. IMSLP is great for practicing repertoire that is difficult to purchase in the flesh. Other children of modern technology are online listening libraries like Naxos and Spotify. These resources are perfect for comparing recordings, ideas on interpretation, tempo indications and sound quality. This helps when learning new pieces and deciding what kind of repertoire to explore next. Like YouTube, these are used for listening to full orchestrations in preparation of auditions or rehearsals and listening to the recordings of pedagogues. Search engines like Google are used daily in all facets of life, whether it be new recipes or looking for information on the flute. It is used for researching masterclasses, job openings in orchestras and ensembles, teaching positions and college auditions. Flutists are now able to better prepare for auditions by finding information about orchestra members, conductors, repertoire preferences, and performance and...

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The Magic of Wind: Bringing Musical Artistry to the Dominican Republic, by Allison Loggins-Hull

Posted by on Mar 1, 2016 in Education, Entrepreneurship, Featured, Issues, March 2016, Outreach, Uncategorized | 0 comments

The Magic of Wind: Bringing Musical Artistry to the Dominican Republic, by Allison Loggins-Hull

I’m thrilled to be a part of this year’s Festival Clarinetísimo in The Dominican Republic. Since 2009, Festival Clarinetísimo has invited prominent clarinetists to give lectures and master classes to students of the National Conservatory of Music and the Elementary School of Music "Elila Mena.” In an effort to branch out and integrate other members of the woodwind family, they have invited me to perform and conduct a variety of classes. From the organizer, Darleny Gonzalez: "We plan for each festival to have a distinct air, its own character. In particular, the presence of Allison Loggins-Hull and her flute at VIII Festival Clarinetisimo would represent an interesting mixture of novelty, different perspectives shared from one woodwind instrument to another, and chamber work through flute-clarinet duets. Mrs. Loggins-Hull’s career and musical projects will surely enrich and inspire the Dominican community of clarinetists and flutists, alike. We are enthused to receive Allison this upcoming March." The Dominican Republic is a developing country and has very limited resources, especially when it comes to the arts and music. Having visited the country in the past, I have fond memories of the wonderful warmth and beautiful beaches, but also, striking recollections of the extreme poverty that the majority of Dominicans live in. More than a third of the Dominican Republic lives on less than $1.25 a day and only 30% of children finish primary school. Half of the country does not have access to clean water, and over half of the country does not have sanitary toilets. Knowing this, one can only imagine the limited access Dominicans have to music education and the performing arts. Participating in this festival allows me to share music and knowledge with a population who would not normally have access to such experiences. It is my hope that my involvement will mark the beginning of the Festival’s continued expansion and ability to serve more and more Dominicans for years to come. The National Conservatory of Music in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic is a Government dependent institution which counts on limited resources for large-scale events like these. For this reason, they are relying on individuals and organizations that take an interest in this project and wish to support it. Please consider making a contribution to support the festival and help bring distinguished artists from around the globe. For more information on the festival, please visit:...

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A Glissando Headjoint Primer. by Melissa Keeling

Posted by on Mar 1, 2016 in Articles, Education, Featured, Issues, March 2016, New Products, Uncategorized | 0 comments

A Glissando Headjoint Primer. by Melissa Keeling

The Glissando Headjoint expands the expressivity, flexibility, and timbral possibilities of the Boehm flute. The culmination of many decades of work by Robert Dick, it has been commercially available for over a decade. Beyond playing glissandi, there are many potential benefits for your overall flute playing: increased aural awareness, greater flexibility of intonation, and a slew of new timbres and harmonies. HOW DOES IT WORK? The Glissando Headjoint works by using a telescoping tube to lengthen the instrument. The headjoint is in “home position” when the tube is slid in completely (where it functions as a regular headjoint); when slid all the way out, it is at “full extension.” Attached near the lip plate are two metal wings, which rest on the player’s cheeks to allow the headjoint to change length. Players should gently bend the wings to fit comfortably (slightly touching the cheeks, but not squeezing them). The range of the glissando varies between a major second to a major third, depending on the pitch. Alternate fingerings are sometimes required to produce a smooth glissando from home position to full extension. Some pitches, particularly in the third octave, will “flip” to another harmonic before the headjoint reaches full extension. BENEFITS FOR TRADITIONAL FLUTE PLAYING Like many other contemporary flute techniques (such as singing, harmonics, and whistle tones), playing the Glissando Headjoint has benefits for traditional playing. The Glissando Headjoint’s flexible intonation forces the player to develop a higher sensitivity to pitch, a sensitivity that carries over even when playing on a regular headjoint. To improve intonation, a few weeks of mindful work with the headjoint should improve the player’s ability to discern small differences in pitch. Fine aural skills are highly cultivated by string players who navigate on a fretless fingerboard and brass players who must discriminate between narrow partials. These skills are often underdeveloped in flutists, who can simply (and sometimes, mindlessly) finger the given pitch. However, the Glissando Headjoint forces the player to have an acute awareness of pitch. Because of this, it is important to spend time practicing the Glissando Headjoint without a tuner. NOTATION The letters “I” (in) and “o” (out) indicate home position and full extension in musical notation, respectively. A fraction indicates how far to extend the headjoint for partial extensions (“-½” represents halfway out). A straight line between two notes, coupled with an arrow between I or o to show the direction the headjoint is moving, indicates a glissando between those notes. For clarity, this article will use two staves: the top shows the sounding pitches, while the bottom shows the fingered note (using a diamond note-head) and headjoint position (I, o, -½). If the headjoint is in home position for a substantial period, the bottom staff is blank. BASIC GLISSANDO HEADJOINT TECHNIQUE Short glissandi and bends can already be played on a traditional open-hole Boehm flute without a Glissando Headjoint by sliding the finger off the hole of a key while keeping the ring depressed. This technique is used frequently in contemporary flute repertoire (see the opening of Dick’s Fish Are Jumping). However, this method of bending notes does not always produce smooth motion, and is impossible in some cases (for example, there is no hole to vent on the C key, or for those playing a flute with closed-hole keys). Fortunately, this is the strength of the...

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Your Career Has Begun: Professional as a Student. By Tammy Evans Yonce, DMA

Posted by on May 1, 2015 in Articles, Education, Essays, Featured, Issues, May 2015 | 0 comments

Your Career Has Begun:  Professional as a Student.  By Tammy Evans Yonce, DMA

As a student, it is important to realize that you are already developing relationships and starting interactions that mark the beginning of your career. I always remind my students that their classmates will become colleagues in a very short amount of time, and they will most likely work with them for a large portion of their careers. By making sure you always present yourself in the best light and you’re respectful of others, you’ll be off to a great start. Be respectful It’s essential to treat everyone with respect. It’s also important to not make assumptions about others. We all have different strengths and a variety of experiences. Approaching a fellow musician with an open mind is more positive than making judgments based on reputation or a brief introduction. We all have something to share. Take advantage of opportunities but don’t commit to more than you can handle It’s really important to take advantage of whatever opportunities present themselves so you can learn from them. Even if you aren’t quite sure how a musical opportunity will help you in the future, it’s a smart idea to develop a variety of skills. Everything you learn will make you a more well-rounded musician. However, it’s easy to commit to too much. It’s important to learn your own limits and make sure you aren’t working on too many projects to the detriment of everything. Is your web presence is professional? The internet is a great place to meet new flutists and stay connected with those outside your immediate geographical area. It’s also really fun to keep up with the various projects everyone is working on and develop new collaborations. It’s crucial to make sure that your web presence is professional, consistent, and up-to-date. It’s also important to engage with people online. Only posting recital announcements and the like and never actually having any interaction is less effective than developing real Share knowledge; we’re all teachers Be generous with your knowledge. When you can be helpful to someone, consider doing We’re all in this together, and each of us has gathered different bits of wisdom along the way. An experience you might have had could possibly help someone else along their path. Every bit of knowledge gained helps contribute to our understanding of flute and flute playing, and it can be a good feeling to be part of that development. Networking; get to know people who like the same things We all know that networking is important. Building a strong network of colleagues is beneficial for everyone involved; we learn from and develop opportunities for each It’s also helpful to meet the people who focus on the same types of music as you do. It’s a good way to stay connected to what’s going on in the specific aspect of flute- playing that you are most interested in, and to get to know the people you might like to work with in the future. It’s smart to get to know the musicians in your immediate area. Reach out beyond your school to musicians in the community, and build from there. Your career begins earlier than you think! These are just a few ideas to consider. By being respectful, careful with your time, professional, generous, and a good colleague, you will get started on...

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RNAD: The Four Cornerstones of Sight-reading. By Samantha Chang

Posted by on Feb 1, 2015 in Articles, Education, Featured, February 2015, Issues | 1 comment

RNAD: The Four Cornerstones of Sight-reading.  By Samantha Chang

Playing a composition at first sight (a prima vista) is a daunting task for many music students. The language of music is composed of an abundance of symbols and rules that require adaptation and interpretation by the performer. An examination of the four cornerstones of sight-reading – RNAD – will allow students to approach sight-reading with confidence and enthusiasm!         What is RNAD?   RNAD stands for rhythm, notes, articulation, and dynamics – four central elements that adjudicators and teachers focus upon in their assessment of students’ performance.   When I first introduced this term to my students, they would often ask why the abbreviation cannot be construed as ‘DARN’? Although catchier than ‘RNAD,’ the order of letters in the abbreviation correlates to the level of attention in the sight-reading process.   RNAD is a method of organization that is most effective with preparation. Just as runners would warm-up and stretch before running, musicians should prep before sight-reading.   Preparation   Find and recognize the basics.   Elements located at the beginning of the composition: Key signature: How many sharps and flats are there? If there are a lot of sharps and flats, try thinking about which notes are not sharp or flat instead. Time signature: How many beats are there per bar? What type of notes receives one beat? Which unit of counting should be used for sight-reading purposes? Just because a piece is written in cut time does not mean we have to count in half notes. Perhaps quarter notes or eighth notes would be easier to process. Musical and tempo markings: Are there any markings that indicate the character or speed of the composition? If a piece is marked Largo, we can certainly take our time; however, if the music is marked prestissimo, we should probably play with a lighter spirit, not necessarily as fast as possible, but definitely faster than Largo. Title, composer, and date: Most students forget to look at the most observable data on the page. Title, composer, and date provide additional information about the style of the composition. This is particularly important when sight-reading Baroque music where trills and ornamentations are treated differently.   Components in the composition: Sequences: Are there patterns? Finding rhythmic or notational patterns will save the brain a lot of work! Identifying musical form is helpful in locating large duplicating segments. Rondo form implies that there is a recurring A section while sonata form indicates that there will be similar passages in the exposition and recapitulation. Key changes and accidentals: Are there any key changes? What about accidentals? Are there double sharps and double flats? Take a minute to locate and digest key changes and accidentals. Remember that accidentals last for the entire measure. Repeats, da capo, dal Segno, coda, and fine: Where is the ending? This may seem quite obvious but some pieces contain so many repeats and alternate endings that the fine may be tricky to find. Difficult passages: Are there any sections that look tricky or difficult. Locate, identify, and acknowledge. Choose your sight-reading tempo based on the trickiest passage.   These preparatory questions act as the foundation of the compositional structure. Many of the answers found in the prep work can be connected and classified into the four cornerstones of sight-reading...

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Fun Idea for Flute Sectionals. By Melinda Wade-English

Posted by on Feb 1, 2015 in Articles, Education, Featured, February 2015, Issues | 0 comments

Fun Idea for Flute Sectionals.  By Melinda Wade-English

1. Inspire Creativity The Princess and The Peasant Game Encourage creativity and imaginative interpretation thru role-playing. Students enjoy playing the princess and peasant game. Start by dividing the flute section into halves. Half of the flute section magically become princesses while the other half become peasants. Play alternating half phrases from melodic etudes or solos. This helps students develop sensitivity to musical shaping of calls and responses. The possibility of color changes for the different musical characters can be explored. Upon completion of the first call and response, quickly switch roles. Everyone wants the chance to be princess (or King, if gender appropriate). The princess and peasant game breaks up the monotony of hammering away again and again on difficult passages, while the well-cultivated fantasy nature of today’s “movie and digital game” youth flourishes.     2. Aid Interpretation The Vocal Improvisation Game In sectionals try improvising words to the melodies that you are rehearsing. In an effort to connect to the students’ lives, create age-appropriate stories for the students’ enjoyment. For a teenage flute section possibly invent a story about a “missing” boyfriend, who is found later “hanging at the mall.” Create conflict (drama) and resolution (peace) and portray it in the most youth comprehensible form. At other times in these vocal improvisation, let the students provide a topic for the piece or etude. With some prodding the students’ imaginations will begin to flow. Suggested topics from students might range from such ideas such as chocolate cake, coffee, kittens, fish, to “brightly-colored easter eggs.” Difficult rhythmic patterns in music can often be aided by the use of carefully constructed vocal improvisation. These vocal additions often aid both interpretation and memorization of melodic lines. Today’s classrooms are full of mentally-bored and checked-out students. The introduction of improvisation will catch these students off guard. Students may take a while to “check back in”: however; by the second or third week; it will be hard to keep up with student-initiated creativity!     3.  Encourage Relaxation It’s Yoga Time Practice breaks are a good thing. Have the students sit in a circle without their flutes. In a quiet voice lead the student in shoulder rolls to help relax their tight flute shoulders. Next, have the students place their hands on their diaphragms and breathe in slowly for six counts (their hands will rise) and then breathe out for six counts (their hand will lower), then have them put their hands on their ribs and breathe in for six counts (their hands will expand) and breathe out for six counts (their hands will lower), and finally have the students put their hands on the top of our chests below their collar-bones and breathe in for six counts (their hands rise) and breathe out (their hands lower). Follow this by having the students take a breath for six counts that fills up all three areas at the same time for six counts in and then release the air for six counts out. Start a discussion with the students. Ask if they feel like they fill up all three areas when they take breaths while playing the flute? If they don’t fill up all three areas, which area do they commonly leave out of their out of their breathing routine? Ask if they could possibly...

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The Opening Doors of Cuba and Cuban Charanga Music. By Andrea Brachfeld

Posted by on Feb 1, 2015 in Articles, Education, Essays, Featured, February 2015, Issues | 0 comments

The Opening Doors of Cuba and Cuban Charanga Music.  By Andrea Brachfeld

This past trip to Cuba in December of 2014 was an especially significant one for me in many ways. It marks the completion of a second seven-year cycle over a period of 14 years that I have been going to Cuba. Our lives, as you may or may not know, go in seven year cycles, so there was a sense of new beginnings when I went. It was also the first year I brought a group of tourists who were mostly musicians with me, so I had dual roles of being the tour guide and performing at the Havana International Jazz Festival. The day we arrived was also the day President Obama announced the easing of relations between Cuba and the US. The overall feeling of the Cuban people was one of relief and euphoria. They are looking forward to receiving proper medical supplies, more communication with their relatives, car parts for their 1940s and 1950s cars, and above all, access to the Internet. I initially went to Cuba in 2000 to verify the research I was doing on Cuban Charanga music which morphed into my multi-media workshop,” The Origin of the Cuban Flute; 1900- present.” As a result of having returned seven times to date, I made contacts each time I went and have played the Jazz Festival five times since then. I have been involved with playing Cuban music since the tender age of 20 when it appeared on my horizon as the perfect way to earn my living while pursuing my Jazz career. I was warned by Mauricio Smith, who turned me on to my first Latin gig, to not stay in the field and to just use it as a stepping-stone. Well, not having heeded his advise, 40 years later I am still steeped in the music, the culture, and the country, and feel blessed to have it all in my life. This is not to say that my Jazz career is not flourishing. On the contrary, one music helps the other and the melding of the two only increases my playing opportunities. This brings me to the music. As we know, the enslavement of Africans from the west, central and southeastern parts of Africa began in the 15th century initiated by the Portuguese with the French, British, Spanish, Dutch Empire and the Thirteen colonies involved as well. Depending on which country participated in the slave trade had a huge significance on the music and culture which was allowed to develop or not, and greatly influenced the music. I will only focus on Cuba and a bit on the United States. Christopher Columbus and the Spanish Conquistadores had specific instructions from Queen Isabella I of Castile, at the time that she granted the funds needed for exploration to the Indies in 1492, that once they encountered any indigenous people in their travels, to convert them to Catholicism thereby creating a feeling of brotherhood and some mutual respect under the guise of master/ slavery mentality. I mention this because the result was that these now African Cubans were allowed to practice their religion as the masters turned a blind eye. Every Sunday, and this tradition continues to this day in Cuba and in many places in the US where many Cubans live, the African Cubans had a...

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See Your Sound. By Shelly Granger

Posted by on Feb 1, 2015 in Articles, Education, Featured, February 2015, Issues | 1 comment

See Your Sound.  By Shelly Granger

See Your Sound: Using Music Visualization for Teaching and Practicing Our smart phones and devices have the power to process and display sound in exciting and innovative ways. We are carrying around mini super computers able to perform real-time computations and graphics rendering unachievable by the most powerful computers built only two or three decades ago. Harnessing this power and convenience and putting it to work to create tools for musicians has long been a goal of mine. I believe that current tuner technology can benefit from combining real-time pitch detection and data-driven visualization, made both possible and practical by our portable mini super computers. I recently partnered with a former flute student of mine from California Polytechnic State University (who majored in Computer Science), Doug Gallatin. We combined my ideas and vision with his coding and technical skills and created a music visualization tuner, Quantz Tuner. Quantz tuner allows you to see your pitch in real-time, observe vibrato, and record and review your pitch and vibrato tendencies. In this article, I will discuss how to use this new visual tuner in teaching and practicing.   QUANTZ TUNER The Quantz Tuner App currently has four main visualization tools. Each tool uses a different visualization to respond to pitch, but they are driven by the same lightning fast pitch-detection algorithm. As your pitch moves, the tools respond immediately with no visible lag time. You can change responsiveness, calibrate to any pitch, and make many other customizations in the settings.    Tuning Circle (aka Vibrato Circle) The first tool is the Tuning Circle. Tuning Circle shows your pitch as a colored circle. As your pitch flattens, the circle flattens with it. As the pitch goes sharp the circle stretches vertically. When the circle is perfectly round, your pitch is in tune. The Tuning Circle is sensitive enough to show the speed and pitch fluctuations of your vibrato as well.   TEACHING TIPS: Use this tool to watch your pitch as you play long tones and slow scales. Beginners especially love this visual tool because of the immediate positive feedback. The circle responds before many people can hear that the pitch has moved. It trains the ear to be more sensitive to pitch fluctuations. When teaching vibrato, use Tuning Circle to demonstrate what it should look like and have students try to imitate the motion of the circle. The real-time, visual feedback helps students to hear the small pitch fluctuations in vibrato and they learn how to imitate it very quickly. Advanced players can view and gain greater control over their vibrato speed and depth.   PITCH LINE: This super sensitive line shows your pitch in real time on a scrolling graph and records what you play so that you can look back at your pitch history. You can even use this tool to learn to play quartertones and microtones. Pitch line is sensitive enough to detect your vibrato’s speed, depth, and regularity throughout your instrument or vocal range.    TEACHING TIPS: Use this tool to help more advanced players explore what their pitch is doing when they begin notes, play long tones and end notes. They can learn about how volume and range affect pitch by watching the tool as they play. Fix those sharp “D’s” and stop going flat at...

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