Essays

The Caffeinated Flutist. by Mary Hales

Posted by on Jun 5, 2018 in Articles, Essays, Featured, Issues, June 2018, Lifestyle | 0 comments

The Caffeinated Flutist. by Mary Hales

The Caffeinated Flutist, Vol. 1: Wish Me Luck!/Maintaining a Professional Presence on Social Media Wish me luck!  This is my first article contributing to The Flute View, and I’m so excited to see where this journey takes me.  I run a WordPress blog called Flute Fridays, but I’ve never contributed to a magazine before, in any form.  I figured to start things off, I would go ahead and introduce myself to you all. My name is Mary Hales, and I’ve been a flutist since I was in the fifth grade.  I earned my Bachelors degree in Flute Performance in 2017, from the University of Central Arkansas in my hometown of Conway, where I studied with Dr. Carolyn Brown.  Currently, I’m working towards my Masters in Performance at the University of Missouri with Prof. Alice K. Dade.  When I’m not practicing, I like to be writing, especially creatively and for my blog, drinking coffee or tea, and advocating for epilepsy awareness.  I was diagnosed in late 2015, and thankfully, with the help of medication, have been seizure free since then. One of the things I want to focus on in this column is being a graduate student, getting on your feet as an entrepreneur, and most importantly, how those things can go hand-in-hand.  I look forward to hearing from you all as I go; I anticipate this being a fun journey for all of us!  So let’s dive right in to my first column, talking about a professional social media presence. Social media has become ubiquitous in modern society; everywhere we go, everyone around us is on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, and probably other platforms that I don’t know enough about to use.  Screen time is often derided as unproductive and wasteful; however, as professionals, instantaneous connection around the globe can be incredibly useful to what we do.  Networking is vital to any venture in life, be it music or data processing.  We all need connections with experience in our respective fields to help us along our paths.  In the modern age, social media can be a great way to connect with others—including, but not limited to, potential colleagues, teachers, employers, and/or clients.  Below, I’ll discuss a few things I’ve tried or seen on social media that make for good networking practices. Reach out to people! If you scroll past a post where someone is asking for advice, don’t just keep going! You’re never going to make connections if you just keep scrolling.  If you feel comfortable chipping in, add your two cents.  At least scroll through the comments; you might find something you agree with and can “like”.  I can speak from experience when I say this is a really helpful thing to do.  As a thank-you to my Instagram following when I reached 500 followers, I recorded a Bach invention with a flutist I’ve never even met, just because I sent her a message.  Turns, out, she also has a pretty awesome feed! (Side note: go check out Jolene Madewell’s account @joleneflute on Instagram for more!) In that same vein…collaborate with others. You’re all on social media for at least one of the same reasons – you want to share your love of music, the flute, and whatever else you attach to it.  If you’re like me and...

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3 Days of Flute in NYC. by Barbara Siesel

Posted by on Jun 5, 2018 in Articles, Blog, Essays, Featured, Issues, June 2018, Lifestyle | 0 comments

3 Days of Flute in NYC.  by Barbara Siesel

As a lifelong New Yorker I tend to take all the amazing cultural offerings here for granted, you know, feeling that I can always attend a concert, go to the museum, find something interesting… so I often don’t go! Several weekends ago I found myself free, in town and thought – I really want to attend some concerts.   I wondered if there were flute concerts to hear and see- maybe I could get inspired, hear a new piece and learn something new.  Happily there were a number of events that fit the bill! Here’s what I experienced over 3 days. Get Inspired On Saturday, Symphony Space (one of our many interesting venues, reclaimed from an old movie theater on the Upper West Side of Manhattan) was holding one of their Wall-to –Wall days of performances of a significant composer. This year was Wall-to-Wall Bernstein.  I couldn’t wait to hear one of my favorite composers played by many of the cities finest musicians. The concert was stretching a good 11 hours so I planned to attend the afternoon segments that focused on Bernstein’s classical music. I was especially interested in hearing a performance of Bernstein’s Halil: Nocturne (1981) played by Mindy Kaufman who is the amazing Piccolo player with the NY Philharmonic. The version that was played is the 1987 version for flute, piano and percussion and the marvelous players in addition to Mindy were Eric Huebner (pianist with the NY Phil), Daniel Druckman (NY Phil) Pablo Rieppi (NYC Ballet Orchestra) and Sae Hashimoto all on percussion.   Here is what Leonard Bernstein says about Halil in the score: “This work is dedicated ‘To the spirit of Yadin and to his fallen brothers… Ḥalil (the Hebrew word for ‘flute’) is formally unlike any other work I have written, but is like much of my music in its struggle between tonal and non-tonal forces. In this case, I sense that struggle as involving wars and the threat of wars, the overwhelming desire to live, and the consolations of art, love and the hope for peace. It is a kind of night-music, which, from its opening 12-tone row to its ambiguously diatonic final cadence, is an ongoing conflict of nocturnal images: wish-dreams, nightmares, repose, sleeplessness, night-terrors and sleep itself, Death’s twin brother. I never knew Yadin Tannenbaum, but I know his spirit.’” Mindy’s flute playing was beautiful, exacting in all facets, rhythm, pitch, sound and emotion, and the other players were equally excellent, I loved hearing all those percussion sounds with flute, it’s such a great combination. The concert was inspiring in several ways, reminding me of how interesting it is as a flutist to play with percussion, and to think about precision as a player in all its aspects. And, given the difficult times we’re living in to remember how music can represent our struggles and conflicts in a way that is non-threatening to those who disagree or oppose us, can instead be healing and consoling and remind us of our shared humanity.  So Saturday was goood!!! Hear New Pieces (and more) On Sunday my friend Stephen Clark was in town from London to perform a short recital as one of the winners of the Alexander & Buono International Flute Competition. They have a flute competition once every 3 years and give...

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How Your Flute Works (Part 2). by Jeff Dening

Posted by on May 2, 2018 in Articles, Essays, Featured, Flute Repair, Issues, Lifestyle, May 2018 | 0 comments

How Your Flute Works (Part 2). by Jeff Dening

Part 2: Use Your Words   Imagine a young student is asked to name a particular note on their music and instead of saying, “F#”, they hold up the instrument and show the fingering.  Every teacher has run into this. Every repair technician has run into this as well with customers of all ages and experience levels.  A client has a problem with their flute but chooses to point to the area rather than risk using the wrong terminology and be thought of poorly.  Do not fret or feel self conscious if you have done this.  How could technicians think poorly of you?  You are paying us! Where the “point and grunt” method does become a challenge and occasionally problematic is in seeking a diagnosis or estimate over the phone.  For example, using the correct terminology for pad vs. bumper can be the difference between a $200 repair and a $20 repair and needing to schedule a large block of time compared to handling it while waiting for a fresh cup of coffee to cool a little. Using the correct terminology in identifying parts of your flute can not only be handy for trivia night, but is essential to learning more about how your flute works.  It addition, using the correct terms can also bring a smile to the face of your curmudgeonly technician. Nomenclature and Terminology   There are inevitable differences in terminology between repairers, makers, and scholars based on region or tradition.  I will list common alternate names for various parts where there could be confusion or possible duplication of terms.  See figures 1 and 2 for the names of the general body components of the flute.     Types and Parts of Keys (Fig. 3)   The cylindrical rods that are arranged throughout the flute are referred to as the hinges.  These could be solid or hollow in construction.  Extending from the hinges are the key arms. The key arms connect to the pad cups.  The pad cups, as their name suggests, hold and support the pads.  In general parlance pad cups are often just referred to as keys.  Occasionally it is necessary to be more specific when referring to specific parts of the keys.   One feature in keys that gets disproportionate weight in marketing is the type of arm connecting the pad cup to the hinge.  The two general types are known as Y-arms and French arms (or French keys).  Y-arms are arms that connect to the rim of the pad cup.  French arms are connected to the pad cup through a spine that connects across the top of the key.  These two designs do not indicate inherent quality.  What type of arm is a decision made on the fabrication level of the instrument.  Most student level instruments have Y-arms because they are easier to mass produce.  This does not mean that a flute with Y-arms throughout is automatically a lower quality instrument.  Details concerning clutches and the Brögger style mechanism will be covered in a future article.   Names of Keys (Fig. 4, 5, & 6)   The common rationale for naming keys is as you add fingers to the flute, the note that comes  out is the name of the key pressed.  There are some keys that are pressed indirectly.   Indirectly...

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How to Stay in Good Flute Shape: Maxim Rubtsov’s “Three C’s”

Posted by on May 2, 2018 in Articles, Essays, Featured, Issues, May 2018 | 0 comments

How to Stay in Good Flute Shape: Maxim Rubtsov’s “Three C’s”

Maxim Rubtsov is principal flute of the Russian National Orchestra, leader of the RNO Wind Quintet, soloist, recording artist and flute teacher. I first met Maxim Rubtsov in the fall of 2010 when he was a featured performer for the University of Alabama’s Celebrity Series.  Since that time, we have performed together in various venues in the United States and Russia, most recently at the 2017 National Flute Association Convention in Minneapolis.  When I heard that Maxim would be giving his Carnegie Hall debut as a soloist on February 14, I immediately made plans to travel to New York City for an evening of “Russian Romance.” Maxim and pianist Sergei Kvitko delighted the Weill Recital Hall audience with a program by Vladimir Tsybin, Andrey Rubtsov (no relation but a former member of the RNO), Sergei Rachmaninoff, John Corigliano (who was in attendance), Mieczyslaw Weinberg, and a premiere of a new work by RNO conductor Mikhail Pletnev.  In addition, Maxim offered a bouquet of charming Russian miniatures, some of which were scores he found in the Russian Imperial Collection at the Library of Congress. As Maxim performed with effortless musicality, great vigor, and infectious personality, I found myself wanting to ask how he is able to maintain his artistic integrity and high level of performance with his grueling performance schedule.  Since 2000 Maxim has been Principal Flute of the Russian National Orchestra, an internationally renowned group that appears regularly throughout Europe, Asia, and the Americas, and he logs thousands of miles per year traveling with the orchestra in addition to his ventures as soloist in recital or with orchestras.  The day after his concert, I was able to ask this question, and it was clear that Maxim has explored this topic in great detail and was able to distill his response into “Three Cs,” outlined below in Maxim’s own words. As everyone knows, the best way to stay in shape is never to leave it. This quality is instilled in professional musicians from a young age. Over time, I developed a series of rules for myself and I stick to them even on vacation and during long trips. My way of life, consisting of constant tours and performance travel, really dictates special requirements for a practice schedule. First of all, nomadic living conditions do not always allow you to adhere to your practice schedule. But with the help of some consciousness exercises, you can quickly come to the first required condition for practice—calmness.  Just tune yourself in to the idea of practice. By doing this, every minute of seclusion can easily be used for the benefit of an upcoming performance or for learning new works, a process which often can be very difficult. The second important belief, which allows you successfully and quickly to focus on practice, is an internal sense of cheerfulness.  This cheerfulness comes from a love of playing the flute, or even from anticipation of playing the flute. If you consider playing the flute a pleasure, you will not have to persuade yourself to practice.  On the contrary, you will treasure every minute with your flute. And third, you need to learn concentration to calmly ignore all the little things around you, the suddenly distracting factors.  Always return to your studies, even if someone has distracted you....

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Master Classes and Lessons at the Gonjiam Festival. by Barbara Siesel

Posted by on Apr 2, 2018 in April 2018, Articles, Blog, Essays, Featured, Issues | 0 comments

Master Classes and Lessons at the Gonjiam Festival.  by Barbara Siesel

At the Gonjiam Music Festival, master teachers from around the world give open lessons to over 60 students attending the festival. I tried to attend as many of these classes as possible since I’d never heard any of these wonderful flutists and pedagogues teach before and I love learning from my colleagues. It was an enlightening experience as they all had so much to offer. Here are my summaries and favorite takeaways from the classes. Philipp Bernold, flutist and conductor: Philipp is the professor of chamber music and flute at the National Paris Conservatoire and a flute soloist and conductor extraordinaire! He beautifully conducted us in Nicole Chamberlain’s trio, Olympus for trio and orchestra, and played the Chaminade Concertino with verve and style between conducting each piece on the program- wow!!! Having had experience of his talent and artistry I wanted to attend the only class that he gave. He’s a marvelous teacher and worked on all aspects of flute with the students. The main points— Make sure you can play expressively without vibrato, thinking about your phrasing like speech, as some notes, like some words have special value. In a short time showing a shy student all manner of ways to play using the woods behind the window to create clear and colorful metaphors to improve her breathing strength, vibrato and phrasing. Bernold has a book-- La Technique d’Embouchure, 4th Edition, published by Billaudot, (available at Flute World) which are 218 exercises for mastery over our embouchure and creating a beautiful tone. He talked about the book in a discussion about using both your embouchure and your air, as he’s created exercises that allow one to develop both a good embouchure and a good, free blowing line with good support. I particularly loved his talk about free blowing the line, that a beginner blows free and loud and that, that impulse is the correct one, as the only energy we have is the air. We work with the diaphragm and the lips and the lips (a muscle) must be trained as well as the diaphragm muscle. My personal take away for my own playing and teaching: To sometimes blow loud and free, practice your scales loud and then spend time playing softer and working on your embouchure. I sometimes play too softly in order to stimulate my support and free my lips, but I found that the free blowing was quite helpful in opening up my sound. It’s another tool in my practice box!! Henrik Wiese Mozart Class: Henrik Wiese is the solo flutist in the Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks, Mariss Jansons chief conductor. A wonderful, exciting player! He also is involved with Mozart, Bach and Reinecke editions of both flute music and symphonic music and has written and made a study of Mozart Cadenza’s (among many other scholarly endeavors). In this class he spoke about Mozart flute music in general and also about Mozart Cadenza’s. The first part of the class was in English and it was illuminating! In answer to a question about Mozart articulation, Henrik doesn’t use traditional double tonguing (tktk) but suggests uses didle didle, so that the lines are more connected, like a singing. He also suggests using limited vibrato in Mozart, and to think about phrasing more, clearly in Mozart. My personal take-away:...

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Keeping Long Tones Fresh. by Francesca Arnone

Posted by on Feb 1, 2018 in Articles, Essays, Featured, February 2018, Issues | 0 comments

Keeping Long Tones Fresh.  by Francesca Arnone

Dr. Francesca Arnone has been featured as a flute and piccolo soloist, chamber musician, orchestral musician, and educator in the US and abroad. For the past 25 years, she has held Principal Flute, Second Flute, and Piccolo positions in the US and Mexico, and this season is performing with the Naples Philharmonic, Sarasota Orchestra, Palm Beach Opera, Opera Tampa, and the Atlantic Classical Orchestra, among others. She has taught at Boise State, West Virginia, and Baylor universities as well as many summer festivals and camps. In addition to her experience reviewing undergraduate through doctoral admission applications and auditions, she has regional, national, and international competition adjudication experience in addition to years of serving on professional orchestral audition and teaching position committees. She’s been a concerto soloist on flute, alto flute, and piccolo, on repertoire ranging from Bach to Chen Yi. Her recordings on MSR and PARMA have met with critical acclaim. See www.francescaarnone.com.   How do we keep our favorite exercises - our go-to, tried-and-true, most comfortable and comfort-offering routines - alive, useful, invigorating, sustaining (look, Ma - no thesaurus - yet!)? In other words, fresh and not dying on the vine. This question can apply to so many things...we like our creature comforts, our "things" and habits that help us feel more secure and safer, especially when we face the day's uncertainties. For musicians, this is an especially  interesting question to pose, as we like our confidence-inducing activities to remain skill-building, yet sometimes we wander into the desert of automatic pilot/self-driving cars/phoning things in/just basically not really being present. . . While a college undergrad, I remember walking up to the practice room building's top floor (since this is where my favorite rooms were located) for each day's first practice session, wondering what exactly kind of tone day it was going to be. Tone is everything to a flute player (and to all musicians, right?!) - it's the ears to the soul, the personal calling card of an individual. It's a big deal. So, sometimes my heart would pound as I unzipped my bag, unlatched the case to my flute...was it going to be a good tone day? A not so great one? A fabulous one? And what to do about it? Here's an average mental exchange from back then: "Yesterday was a pretty good tone day - I'd better start with EXACTLY the same long-tone exercise on EXACTLY the same pitch as I did yesterday." Naturally, sometimes that approach would work, and of course, sometimes that would not. Now that I refuse to play Eight Ball with my sound or my playing (!) I celebrate the wisdom of balancing exercises and knowing what I need to do to keep things fresh: be creative, participate, experiment, and play. So I'm attacking the much-revered exercise, the long tone. What exactly is this important component of a wind player's practicing? Long tones are generally exactly what their name implies:  sustained pitches, under which we play a smooth crescendo and decrescendo, to help us focus on the beginning, development, and release of the tone.  Here's a good explanation by a horn expert, Bruce Hembd, including the key of developing the right mindset to practice these particular exercises effectively, as well as the importance of changing things up (that's our fresh-picked ingredient!)....

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The Benefits of Slow Practice. By Anna Luther

Posted by on Jan 2, 2018 in Articles, Essays, Featured, Issues, January 2018 | 0 comments

The Benefits of Slow Practice.  By Anna Luther

I have lost count of the number of times I have been told as a student to engage in "slow practice." I'm equally at a loss as to the number of times I've passed on this direction as a teacher. "Try that section again, slowed down." "When you work on this at home next week, slow it down to a more comfortable tempo." "Spend some time with this phrase at a slower tempo." "If you slow down, you'll be able to coordinate fingers and air more easily." "That left over right hand crossing will smooth out if you slow it down."   But regardless of whether you are on the giving or receiving end of this advice, sometimes it can feel like you're listening to a broken record. Why all of this emphasis on slow practice? It's excruciating At first blush, slow practice can feel torturous, no matter how long you've been playing music. Slowing your 16th notes down so they are played like 8ths--or somehow worse, quarter notes--can feel like the ultimate in excruciating practice. If you're a beginner, you may assume the teacher thinks you can't handle the "real" tempo of a piece. A little more advanced, and it feels like you're holding yourself back by spending so much time under the final tempo. And I can tell you as a professional, there's a real temptation to think you are "better than this" when a beloved mentor recommends you spend some time with your metronome set to what feels like an unreasonably low number. The rewards are worth it Why do musicians hear and share this correction so often? Because it has tremendous merit. There is so much to be gained from slowing down and being fully aware of what and how we are playing. Here are a few of my favorites.   Intonation One of the greatest gifts my high school flute teacher gave me--aside from an enduring love of the Baroque--was a deep understanding of slow practice and intonation. Under her expert guidance, I spent months with Trevor Wye's Tone book, a tuner, and a metronome set at 60 bpm. Slowing down, working in half step pairs of quarter notes, allowed me to really understand how I was producing sound, what I could change to get a more focused/in tune tone, what sort of sound concept I wanted to convey. What I learned in those slow practice sessions continues to inform my playing and teaching two decades later.     Accuracy The phrase "perfect practice makes perfect" is attributed to Vince Lombardi, and it is as applicable in the practice room for musicians as it is on the practice field for athletes. While we can discuss whether the word "perfect" really should have a place in our vocabulary as musicians, there's a great lesson here regardless. Accurate, deliberate practice leads to accurate, deliberate performance. Often times when working on a piece at a fast tempo, our inclination is to push to keep the speed up, sometimes sacrificing accuracy in the name of speed. Approaching a piece slowly allows for the opportunity get comfortable with the finger patterns, embouchure changes, air speed, and other nuances that can easily be overlooked when playing fast.   Stamina Slow practice strengths the physical aspects of your playing. If you can make...

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How to STAND OUT in a world of SPAM. by Fluterscooter

Posted by on Dec 1, 2017 in Articles, December 2017, Entrepreneurship, Essays, Featured, Issues | 1 comment

How to STAND OUT in a world of SPAM.  by Fluterscooter

Black Friday. Giving Tuesday. Cyber WEEK (didn't it used to be just Cyber Monday?)  As we're in the midst of holiday Spam Season, I thought it would be a good time to share what has been on my mind lately.  Every year, I feel worse and worse about sending holiday sale newsletters and promoting social media posts.  And I shouldn't feel bad about it.  I worked hard to establish my business for the past 7 years, and I enjoy making my fellow flutists happy with a flute bag they adore.  I continue to speak to college students and graduates about Entrepreneurship in the creative arts, I encourage them to think outside of the box, and I give them advice on starting their own businesses as I did. In a recent talk to a college Music Business class, we discussed how to promote yourself, and the topic of spam came up.  While just a few years ago, I encouraged students to promote themselves heavily on social media, now I am telling them to shy away.  We talked about how, these days, everyone has a brand (including themselves as an artist) that they are trying to push.  The problem is how to differentiate between the real and the fake.  And I guess that is a common thread everywhere now.  The internet has grown into a spam mega-mall, and it seems everywhere you turn, someone is trying to sell you something. First, we need to clarify the difference between supporting an entrepreneurial business, and one of the minions of a multi-level marketing pyramid scheme.  While so many facebook friends now have their own "small businesses" of selling everything from press-on nails to essential oils to jewelry from multi-level marketing companies, and they are constantly sending messages and posting to get friends to buy these products, we tend to get overwhelmed and our inboxes oversaturated.  There is nothing wrong with having a side hustle, but the problem lies within the over-posting, the aggressive marketing tactics, and the lack of personalization.  We have turned into robots marketing to fellow robots. So, what IS the new way?  How can we stand out if everything gets filtered in with everything else?  How do we differentiate the real from the fake and choose what businesses to support?  One idea is to go back to making things personal again.  We are all craving more real experiences and personal connections, at least I am.  Lets pretend there is no internet, for a second.  How would you get your brand out there? Here is a good exercise for you:  Think of 3 ways, without internet/social media, that you can reach people in a more authentic and personal way.  Here are mine: COLLABORATE.  No, I don't mean collaborate on another "Acapella" video.  Collaborate with real people in real life.  Go to events, concerts, etc..to meet those people. DISCUSS.  Lets have real conversations again.  Lets speak over the phone, lets have in person meetings.  Lets discuss our thoughts with as many people as possible.  Build your network based on personal connections rather than impersonal emails. LISTEN and SLOW DOWN.  Listen to each others' ideas.  Are we really listening?  Are we really paying attention?  The more we can understand each other and understand how connected we are, the more success we will can all build together....

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Is your Social Media feed affecting your self-esteem and productivity? by Fluterscooter

Posted by on Dec 1, 2017 in Articles, December 2017, Essays, Featured, Health & Wellness, Issues, Lifestyle | 0 comments

Is your Social Media feed affecting your self-esteem and productivity?  by Fluterscooter

How many times have you checked Instagram today?  Facebook?  Twitter?  Are you looking at your phone as you're reading this article?  How many times did you check your phone during your last practice session?  These modern technologies are not only causing us to become more distracted and disconnected, but they are also affecting our self-esteem and productivity both in the practice room and in our daily lives. We took an Instagram poll: 116 replied that they turn their phone off/on silent during practicing, but 85 replied that they do not. And this is a problem. As a student and a young professional flutist, I consider myself lucky that smartphones did not exist during my formative years.  I had intensely focused practice sessions with no distractions except if someone needed the practice room.  Where I see how phones are necessary to not miss calls for gigs and such, I do not see the point of bringing them into the practice room otherwise.  Since I started my Transcendental Meditation practice, the importance of quieting the mind and getting into a zone of pure focus has changed my practicing methods.  Think of your flute practice as a meditation.  Would you check your phone when you meditate? For example, you are concentrating on a phrase, and then your phone vibrates.  Whether or not you check the message, the thought of the phone vibrating is still there, and your phrase has been interrupted and your concentration affected. Or you take a break and check social media, with the rage of the daily news infiltrating your thoughts.  Picking up your flute after that and trying to focus on creating beautiful music will not be as easy.  Or, you look at videos from other flutists and think to yourself, will I ever be that good?  While the videos can also be motivating, for the most part, they set unrealistic expectations for a less advanced student and can be discouraging. Is the next generation of musicians turning into distracted performers? It will be interesting to see how this next generation of flutists will be as performers.  Will their performances flow as well as their predecessors'?  How will nerves come into play?  And what about audiences? For those of you who answered "No" to our Instagram poll, here are a couple things you could try: Disconnect to Reconnect.  I have been making it a habit to turn off all devices at 8pm every night.   Try it!  And, of course, try it in the practice room and see how much more connected you are to the music. Stop looking Outward and look Inward.  Look within the music, your sound, your breath.  If you feel yourself getting distracted by the outside world, look...

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Canary in a Coalmine Project. By Lois Herbine

Posted by on Nov 1, 2017 in Articles, Essays, Featured, Issues, November 2017 | 0 comments

Canary in a Coalmine Project. By Lois Herbine

Lois Bliss Herbine is an internationally renowned solo piccolo recording artist. All six accompanied recordings from her CD, Take Wing, including premieres of Michael Daugherty, Daniel Dorff and Vincent Persichetti, can be heard on radio stations across the United States. The Gramophone hails her recital as “high-flying” and Music Web International exclaims, "Another leading wind soloist takes flight”. Philadelphia Inquirer music critic David Patrick Stearns described her piccolo performance for her Concerts at Carmel series DTR records release a “model of color driven expression”. A premiere solo recording on Inverno Azul (BCM&D Records) of music by composer Cynthia Folio has gained much interest in her work Philadelphia Portraits: A Spiritual Journey for piccolo and piano which is currently being performed by professional piccoloists around the world. It's first known broadcast was August 22, 2016 on Canadian radio CKWR FM 98.5. Herbine has performed multiple times at National Flute Association conventions to favorable press, including premieres of solo music for piccolo by David Finko, Daniel Dorff, Cynthia Folio and Lucien Posman. She has performed on two closing ceremonies - in Anaheim 2010 as a duet with European piccoloist Peter Verhoyen and she shared the stage with some of the worlds' top piccolo players and the US Army Field Band during the 2015 closing ceremonies. Composer Howard Hersh’s I Had to Go Down in the Mines to Climb Up to the Sky is an aural memoir for solo piccolo with a ghost choir of 16 recorded piccolos. Its premiere will take place on a full piccolo recital in the Capistrano Concert Hall at Sacramento State University’s Festival of New American Music on November 7, 2017 at 8:00 PM The festival is one of the West Coast’s leading forums for contemporary American music and this year it is celebrating 40 years of free recitals, concerts, lectures and educational outreach. The premiere from this accomplished Californian composer will be the finale of my solo piccolo recital, including works by Daniel Dorff, Joseph Hallman, Cynthia Folio, Vincent Persichetti and Michael Daugherty. This concert, titled Moving West, is sponsored by Powell Flutes. A 2006 article that I wrote for New Music USA’s online publication TheNewMusicBox, Escaping the Nutcracker Suite: Composing for the 21st Century's Piccolo Player with sound samples from past recordings, attracted the attention of composers and professors of composition who reached out to me online. One in this community of readers was Howard Hersh. We began a correspondence and he sent me one of his recent CDs. I was immediately drawn to his music and knew that one day we would collaborate. I Had to Go Down in the Mines to Climb Up to the Sky was composed in 2013 in service of the bravery and anguish of America’s great immigrant experience. It was inspired by the history of my family, whose heroic lives as laborers facing daily struggles in the coal mining communities in both Wales and Pennsylvania laid the foundation for the opportunities that I and my children now enjoy. This living history connects two worlds for me- my love for the piccolo and reaching new audiences outside the orchestra and my love of ancestral research. My ancestral story begins with my great, great grandfather, John Lewis, who perished in the pit along with 178 men and boys in the great coalmining explosion of 1867 in Wales. Within weeks Great Britain set up the...

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