Interviews

Galway Flute Festival: Concert Reviews

Posted by on Aug 1, 2017 in Articles, August 2017, Featured, Interviews, Issues | 0 comments

Galway Flute Festival: Concert Reviews

Opening Gala Concert with Sir James and Lady Jeanne Galway   The gala concert featuring Sir James and Lady Jeanne Galway was the perfect opener to a week long of concerts, and it featured the "classics" such as Chaminade's Concertino, Widor's Suite, Faure's Fantasie, and Doppler's Andante and Rondo.  It is always refreshing to hear these pieces played, as they are some of the first flute pieces many of us learn, so the opportunity to hear them played by a master is very special. Pianist, Catherine Rechsteiner was the dazzling pianist who provided an elegant support to Sir James Galway's ravishing flute. Sir James' Chaminade was sparkling and energetic, and the public really enjoyed listening to his beautiful execution of the Widor Suite. Of course, seeing the couple play together as a duo is always something special. Their performance of Doppler's Andante and Rondo was beautifully flowing and perfectly in sync with each other, much like the couple in person!       --Andrea "Fluterscooter" Fisher         Juliette Hurel and Lorna McGhee Recital   Juliette Hurel  www.juliettehurel.com  concert soloist and solo flutist with the Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra  opened the concert, accompanied by the excellent pianist Catherine Rechsteiner.  She played  two works by Saint-Saens, the Romance and the Odelette, op.162 The Odelette is new to me, a very lovely piece and Ms Hurel played it with the perfect combination of sounds-- projecting, shining and molding the music and with beautiful color and shape within the lines. The second piece on the program was the Poulenc Sonata, which she played with just the right balance between playful and serious, in perfect style for this piece.  The tempo in the 3rd movement took my breath away!! Hurel is a beautiful, imaginative player, who connects with her audience with beauty and joy. Lorna McGhee- www.lornamcghee.com Scottish born Lorna McGhee is the principal flutist with the Pittsburgh Symphony, and before immigrating to the US was the co-principal flute of the BBC Symphony Orchestra. She performed (with wonderful pianist Kamelia Miladinova) a very interesting and unusual program.  The opening piece is by Dick Kattenburg, a Dutch, Jewish composer who died at age 24 in Auschwitz. To learn a bit more about him check out this article: http://www.allmusic.com/blog/post/collateral-damage-dick-kattenburg-1919-1944/ It’s a great addition to the repertoire of Entartete Musik (degenerate music). The piece is a terrific, with jazz and movie music influences, idiomatic for the flute and full of joy and good cheer. Lorna brought the work to life with her powerful sound and joyous playing. The next piece by Maurice Ravel was Sonate, Opus Posthume,  which was published posthumously but written when Ravel was 22 years old.  Ravel here seems to be just finding his voice, you can hear little buds of his later music in this lyrical piece. The final work on the program was Chaconne by Tomaso Antonio Vitali, a work for violin, transcribed for flute.  McGee brought down the house with her stellar virtuosity, beautiful, powerful sound and amazing violinistic “downbows”. The two closed the concert with a Mendelssohn duet, and it was a joy to hear these two players matching their sounds and musicianship in this quiet, lyrical work.   --Barbara Siesel   Philipp Jundt, Shengqi He, and Paolo Taballione   With the first notes of Enesco’s "Cantabile et Presto," flutist Philipp Jundt and pianist Catherine Rechsteiner...

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Galway Flute Festival: The Students

Posted by on Aug 1, 2017 in Articles, August 2017, Blog, Featured, Interviews, Issues | 0 comments

Galway Flute Festival: The Students

  The students of the Galway Flute Festival were not only fantastic flutists, but also great personalities! We asked them about the festival, working with Sir James Galway, their goals, inspirations, and advice they would offer to younger students.      Katy Wherry 2017 Rising Star  Amy Gillen 2017 Rising Star  Audrey Emata The Flute View Young Artist Competition Winner Lucas Martins Pedro Brazil Valerie Henning Germany, Festival Translator Albert Pae Former Rising Star, Festival Team, and technical assistant Amy Pribuluck...

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Lady Jeanne Galway: Artist Interview

Posted by on Jul 1, 2017 in Featured, Interviews, Issues, July 2017 | 0 comments

Lady Jeanne Galway: Artist Interview

A graduate of New York City’s Mannes College of Music, Lady Jeanne Galway has risen to become one of the world’s leading female flautists. She is an accomplished and much celebrated artist who regularly tours internationally in diverse and virtuosic programmes, and is also deeply committed to music education initiatives.   Lady Galway’s concerto appearances have been with many of the leading orchestras in the United States, including Chicago, Philadelphia, and Pittsburgh. In Europe, she regularly performs in London, Milan, Rome, Vienna, Salzburg and Zürich, and she frequently visits Tokyo, Beijing and Singapore. Recent performance highlights have seen Lady Galway joining her husband Sir James in concert tours across the globe, including South America and South Africa, and a recital at Carnegie Hall. Forthcoming highlights of her 2015/2016 concert season include major tours of Asia, Europe and the United States.   Can you give us 5 career highlights?   As a young student in winning the NY Flute Club Competition and performing the Demersseman 6e Solo de Concert   My first professional principal flute orchestral position: Queens Philharmonic Orchestra with JoAnne Falletta as conductor   Recording and my first duo CD for RCA/Sony: The Bach Trio Sonata with James Galway, Monica Huggett, Sarah Cunningham and Philipp Moll on Cembalo, and taking it on a 20 plus US concert tour including a sold out Carnegie Hall performance.   Performing with London Mozart Players in The Vienna Musikverein and receiving a standing ovation, having to play the last movement of the Cimerosa double concerto again.   Performing with the London Symphony at the Royal Albert Hall   Becoming Sir James Galway’s teaching assistant   How about 3 pivotal moments that were essential to creating the artist that you've become? Having a top level, performing professional flutist as a teacher in High school   Moving to New York City and studying at the Mannes College of Music at the age of 17, where I began pursuing my dream being surrounded only by music and musicians.   Meeting and developing a relationship with James Galway - ours was first a musical one!   What do you like best about teaching?   Everything. It is one of the greatest gifts in my life that I have been given. There is nothing like sharing one’s knowledge with a student, no matter what level and share all that I have learned over the years. I feel myself become someone else when I teach.   What do you like best about performing?   The magic…..   New CD releases?   Yes, but still in the pipelines - cannot yet discuss.  I have a meeting in NY this week to discuss this...watch this space!   What does your schedule look like for the next 6 months?   At the moment, I am working on getting our Galway Flute Academy On-Line Series up and running. This is huge project, which includes pre- recorded videos of playing and teaching of both my husband and myself, along with many tips for not only flutists but all musicians of all levels. Summer - Our 27th Galway Flute Academy Festival in Weggis Switzerland - very exciting.   Ravinia festival in the US with orchestral concert with the Chicago Symphony, recital and a day of workshops.   September - 3 weeks tour of Ireland a UK- including Live on the BBC- Last Night of the Proms from...

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Keeping Up With Kaori: What’s Next for Music Beyond

Posted by on Jul 1, 2017 in Articles, Entrepreneurship, Essays, Featured, Interviews, Issues, July 2017 | 0 comments

Keeping Up With Kaori: What’s Next for Music Beyond

We wrote about Music Beyond a few years back.  How has Music Beyond grown since then?   In August, Music Beyond will mark 3 years since the inception. Our student base has grown about 6x and we have manage to provide over 400 hours of training (by the time I come back from the trip I'm about to head out, it'll most likely be over 500 hours!).   What has changed for MB, and what new components have you added?   Our first initiative was a music teacher training program for existing woodwind musicians in Kinshasa, the capital of the Democratic Republic of Congo. This program is still continuing, but we also started Congo's very first All-female chamber ensemble last year.   Your gala was incredible!  Tell us some of the key steps in organizing and arranging a charity event.   Oh dear... I don't even know where to begin! Come up with an overall budget, find a venue suitable for the expected number of guests, find caterer, decide on the overall theme / character of the event, secure keynote speakers and/or special guests that fits to the theme/character of the event... Then all the tedious work begins- go over the details about million times, sending out invitations (over and over and over!!), finding sponsors, secure silent auction items, making/updating tons of spread sheets, making / printing programs.... etc etc etc. Got the idea? ;)   You'll be in the Congo when this comes out.  What will you be doing on this trip, specifically?   I will be working with the musicians for almost 4 weeks this time. Monday through Saturday from 11am to 6pm outside! I will continue to work with the woodwind players but my focus this time will be all-female ensemble. LOTS of fundamental exercises, both private and group lessons, ensemble coaching... And a concert at the Japanese Ambassador's Residence!   What is the role of music in empowering citizens of DRC?  and especially the women of DRC?   DR Congo is one of the most difficult counties on earth. Capital city Kinshasa has 12 million people, yet there are many neighborhoods that don't have electricity or running water. Majority of Congolese families can't afford education for kids and especially if you are a girl, the chance for education diminishes even further. (It's normal for a family to send only boys to school but not girls) Multiple conflicts and wars have been taking place for over 2 decades straight and the government is completely corrupt. On top of all that, DRC is known as the "rape capital of the world" and is labeled as "the worst place to be a woman". So, obviously many people had completely lost hope and faith - both men and women. As a woman, it's even harder surviving, let alone thriving in DRC. Having said that, there ARE groups of people who are doing everything in their power to moving forward, building their community from the ground up and stay hopeful. What kind of people can do that? - People who manage to find fulfillment in life. Music can be a great source for fulfillment and when we are fulfilled, it gives us a tremendous amount of dignity, confidence and happiness, which result in being able to be empathetic to others and help each other. Speaking...

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Monica Song: Artist Interview

Posted by on Jul 1, 2017 in Featured, Interviews, Issues, July 2017 | 0 comments

Monica Song: Artist Interview

Monica Song is one of those teachers who have a gift for drawing out the best in their students. A native of Korea who grew up with a love of music, Song has been teaching flute in Dallas for 25 years. Her students place first in many competitions and win a slew of music awards. They also earn scholarships to top colleges.   Song started her musical career in a children’s choir at age 6. She switched to flute in high school and became a member of the Korean Broadcasting System Symphony and Seoul Woodwind Quintet at age 21.   When she and her husband came to the United States, she joined the Alexandria, Va., Symphony and became its principal flutist. After a few years, they moved to Dallas, where she opened a flute studio. A member of many music organizations, Song has herself received many awards and accolades for the accomplishments of her students.     Can you give us 3 pivotal moments that were essential to creating the artist that you've become? Tell us about your Teaching Studio, it seem that all your students are winners!  What is your secret? There are three essential things to create my students to become artists. First, they have to like me – that means I try to make them like the flute and come to the lesson very happy. Second, I must give them opportunity to improve – all the chances I can give such as regional or national competitions, annual studio recital, and always prepare for improvement. It is the endless experiences of preparation that will make them succeed. Third, the environment of encouragements in the studio. Not only me encouraging the students, the students will have to learn how to encourage and congratulate each other. What are your goals personally?  Professionally? Personally, I want to be a good mother, good grandmother, and good wife. I am a very plain person! Professionally, I want to be my students’ best helper and supporter no matter if they are doing music or not for their career. What inspires you the most in life? Pope Francis. One of my favorite quotes from him is: “Life can survive only because of the generosity of other lives.” What has been your greatest challenge? Six years ago, I started my annual Young Artist Recital (separate from the studio recital) featuring very, very talented musicians around the world so I can make my students to attend concerts. Students hardly come to the concerts these days! This year, the 7th Young Artist Recital will feature internationally renowned young flutists, Yubeen Kim, who is now the Principal Flute of Berlin Konzerhauser Orchestra. Sponsoring these concert series myself is very challenging and I hope this will be successful continuously. Who were your music mentors? and what did you learn from them? Samuel Baron. He came to Korea when I was the member of the KBS Symphony Orchestra and Seoul Wind Quintet. He offered full scholarship to study in US and sponsor through Albert Weatherly Flutes. Because I admire his generous personality as performer and teacher, I would like to become a mentor like him. Can you give us 5 quirky, secret, fun, (don't think too much about this) hobbies or passions? Singing. I started music when I was 5...

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Emily Skala: Artist Interview

Posted by on Jun 1, 2017 in Blog, Featured, Interviews, Issues, June 2017 | 0 comments

Emily Skala: Artist Interview

Emily Skala has been the Principal Flutist of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra since 1988 and a faculty member of the Peabody Institute since 1989. Recent years have provided substantial opportunity for international travel to Brazil, the United Kingdom, France and Germany, to perform on tour and at music festivals worldwide: Southbank Centre’s “The Rest Is Noise” Festival (UK), Campos do Jordao Winter Festival (Brazil), and Carnegie Hall. An expert in orchestral repertoire, Ms. Skala has performed, adjudicated, taught, and commissioned new works at the National Flute Association’s annual conventions.   Can you give us 5 career highlights?   It is interesting to me to realize that when I look back on my career in a thoughtful retrospection and self-assessment, all the concerts, rehearsals, auditions, recitals, competitions, chamber music, the classes, rather bleed together and form a rolling sea of feelings and sensations that hardly distinguish themselves one from the other. They all seem to pour together and form my way of being. But just as in any ocean a creature will jump out from the deep and amaze the onlookers as they surface or fly, my special experiences stand out and can momentarily be seen more vividly than most. Your question has made me search my memory banks! Here is what I have stirred up:    1     Itzhak Perlman's compliment of my Brahms Symphony #4 solo. He loved the unforced low notes at the end! Something he never gets to hear. Validation from artists on this level is extremely meaningful. Even if it is about only one or two notes.    2     Making the semifinals of the 2014 Berlin Philharmonic Principal Flute search; being the only American flutist to achieve this; and being one of only two women to advance to this level. It was the most fun audition experience I ever had (in fact, I didn't know they could be fun)! I felt like I had truly accomplished something that day. And while I was there, I was able to listen to an afternoon rehearsal of Schubert's "Rosamunde" Overture. The orchestra was supposed to have performed that week's concert under Claudio Abbado's leadership. Sadly, Maestro Abbado had passed away four months earlier. They kept his program in tact, however, and played the Schubert without conductor as an homage to this important musician. It was Abbado's favorite piece. The richness of the sonorities that emerged from the orchestra and dedication to musical collaboration and expression among the musicians of the Berlin Philharmonic was breathtaking. I will never forget this sound. It was something I have never heard before and never expect to hear again, unless I can manage to fit more travel into my life! All the stories we hear about this orchestra are true. So if you can afford to go, you must hear the Berlin Philharmonic in the Berlin Philharmonie!    3     I cannot forget the Aspen Festival Orchestea's performance of Mahler's Symphony #3, with the late and wonderfully musical Maestro Sergiu Comissiona conducting. In this performance I worked side by side with my first great mentor and Principal Flutist of the Aspen Festival Orchestra, Albert Tipton. All this when I was just 16 years old. This week of wondrous music making confirmed my love of orchestral flute playing. I knew I was doing absolutely the right thing....

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Christopher Caliendo: 2T Flute Academy Interview

Posted by on Jun 1, 2017 in Featured, Interviews, Issues, June 2017 | 0 comments

Christopher Caliendo: 2T Flute Academy Interview

What is the 2t Academy?     The 2t Flute Academy (www.2tacademy.com) is an online global event featuring 25 of the most popular flutists sharing their success stories in one-hour documentary interviews. The 2T Flute Academy provides young musicians an opportunity to learn how their favorite flute artists became successful by observing the choices they made immediately after graduating college. The opening ceremonies begin Sunday, June 11, at 11:00 am PST, and the closing summit is June 18, when I will announce all the sponsor prizes and distribute my success formula for flutists based on my research and study of the success traits of these unique artists. Why did you decide to create the 2t Academy?   The 2t Flute Academy was inspired by my belief that flutists could benefit from an affordable online school whose primary focus is on the success stories of many of their favorite flutists. To accomplish this, my team chose video. During our research, we discovered that one minute of video is equal to 1.8 million words and about 3,600 web pages. This equals a stronger emotional connection, greater affordability and a higher customer-conversion and retention rate. In addition, companies I revere and emulate, such as The Great Courses, feature the best of the best college courses on video so you can enjoy learning on your own time and in your own desired location via computer or smartphone. Biography also features the life stories of various historical figures and celebrities on video. Both of these formats use video because it communicates information faster, and the process is more entertaining and enjoyable. The 2t Flute Academy continues this standard of learning by focusing on the choices flutists make after graduation day.  Studying these choices helps us understand how these flutists’ artistic vision was shaped. Through video, 2T Flute members will learn quickly the success process of their favorite flutists and how they promoted themselves toward self-discovery. During our closing ceremonies on June 18, REGULAR and VIP members of the 2T Flute Academy will receive a PDF of all the 25 flutists’ distinguishing characteristics. These characteristics will be analyzed, broken down and formatted into a success method so we can all learn together as one community. In addition, the interviews will provide members with a valuable shortcut to discovering ideas and approaches that they may wish to incorporate into their own journey and development. In essence, the 2t Flute Academy provides flutists mentors at a distance. I also explored the 2t Flute Academy as an alternative to the National Flute Association (NFA) for people who can’t afford the flight, hotel, registration and food costs. The NFA will continue to benefit from a physical location where many young flutists can hear and meet their favorite artists. However, the NFA may be limited in its global outreach and therefore unable to successfully influence every flutist in the world. Similar to the NFA, we have an online exhibitor’s hall whose links navigate the member to sheet music, CDs and method books promoted by the artist. There are two memberships: Regular membership is priced at $9.99 and VIP at $39.99. Regular members will have live access to all 25 interviews and a chance to win a handmade Brent Haines Grenadillo Native American Indian flute. VIP members will have unlimited access...

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Irina Stachinskaya: Artist Interview

Posted by on May 1, 2017 in Featured, Interviews, Issues, May 2017 | 0 comments

Irina Stachinskaya: Artist Interview

Can you give us 5 career highlights? In my opinion, there are just three of them: a) To meet your teacher/mentor b) To work hard c) to be in the right place at the right time How about 3 pivotal moments that were essential to creating the artist like you've become? I started to perfom when I was 7. I played blockflute and my mom was my stage partner. It is very important to be free on the stage, not to be scared of it. When you started to perform at young age, it‘s much easier to come into the process. Do you teach? master classes?  What do you like best about teaching? One year ago a friend of mine, Nikolay Plotnikov, in collaboration with Ilya Dvoretsky, founded the first flute center in Russia - The Magic Flute Center of Moscow. This is a truly magic place in a busy, speedy city. You can come here any time to play, to teach, to meet friends, to drink wonderful green tea, and, of course, to keep up your instrument in great condition. I hold orchestra master classes in the center and it’s like my studio, and the main joy in teaching is to observe an improvement of each person. What do you like best about performing? I love the contact between yourself and the audience. That moment when your musical thoughts find a response in other people’s hearts. When you've worked hard, it is very important to keep all musical ideas right to the stage. CD releases? In collaboration with fantastic musician, my mentor Phillip Moll we recorded the “Russian Dreams” album. It was released on the world famous Russian label “Melodia” a year ago. On this CD you will find Sonatas by Prokofiev, Taktakishvili, Denisov and Samonov and the small sparkling virtuoso piece written by soviet flutist Vladimir Tsybin. What does your schedule look like for the next 6 months? I have several invitations to festivals in Europe and in Russia. I am very happy to be invited again to Sir James Galway Festival in Weggis (Switzerland) this year. What are your goals personally?  Professionally? My dream to begin driving a car has just come true. Other principal aims are to speak fluent English and French, and to ride a bike! My professional aim is to achieve respect for the flute as a solo instrument – to rise it to the same concert level as violin, cello and piano. What inspires you the most in life? I try to find positive moments everywhere, whether it snows, or the sky is open and sunny or full of gray clouds. Sometimes books are inspiring to me. Sometimes it is also Facebook news that shows successful and happy faces of my dear friends. What can be more inspiring? What has been your greatest challenge? The most difficult thing, a challenge, is to change some negative opinions about you in society. When I was 17, I won a position to the Moscow Phil. My colleagues were not happy to welcome a 17-year-old person in the woodwind section. Another problem was that conductor really liked my playing. That period was very difficult to me. But quite soon relations between section members and me started to get better. Now we are very good friends. Who were your...

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Ma Bo: Artist Interview

Posted by on May 1, 2017 in Featured, Interviews, Issues, May 2017 | 0 comments

Ma Bo: Artist Interview

Professor Ma Bo is the Associate Professor and a tutor for graduates at Conservatory School of Northwest University for Nationalities; the head of computer music lab of NorthWest University for Nationalities; Director of the China Flute Federation; Vice Chairman & Executive Director of Flute Art Committee of Gansu Province; Director of Wind Instrument Association of Gansu Province. B: What do you like best about performing? And about teaching? M: In my performing, I really enjoy expressing my true emotions and feelings through the very special language of music. In my teaching, when students' performing technique and ideas are improved or enriched through my instruction, I feel most satisfied and excited. On the other hand, I am often inspired and enlightened by my students' learning from my teaching and performing, which is also really exciting to me. B: What are your goals professionally? Personally? M: To be a flute teacher, I always try my best and encourage myself to be the one with great passions, a strong sense of responsibility, advanced educational ideas, effective teaching methods, solid professional technique, and care for my students. B: What inspires you most about teaching? M: That my teaching works! I suppose my students' passions, efforts and improvements that they have or make on what they are learning in flute playing, this inspires me the most. What's more, I often learn a lot through communication with my students, and their suggestions and advise on my teaching. B: Who were your teachers? Your mentors? M: He Shengqi, a well known flutist and a flute educator in China, a professor at Shanghai Conservatory School. B: Where did you study? The Department of Western Instruments, Shanghai Conservatory School, China B: Tell us about your upcoming performances or plans. M: I am planning to organize a flute band, and I hope each of my students will be a member of this band, which will be helpful for them in improving their playing techniques and performing ideas. B: Tell us about your favorite performance. M: Emmanuel Pahud is my favorite flute performer! B: What advice would you offer young flutists? M: Strong determination and persistence are the key for every young flutist, whenever faced with difficulties and setbacks in this process, you can definitely find the solutions to any problem as long as you are learning. If you give up, then there is no chance to find any solution. Never surrender and never give up! This is what I most want to say to them. B: Tell us one dream that you have for your life. M: I hope, one day, I may have enough money and enough time to travel around the world with my family. B: Tell us about something non-musical that you like to do most. M: I like running in my spare time, which is not only good for my health but also a good time to reflect on...

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Cobus du Toit Flute Studio Interviews

Posted by on Mar 1, 2017 in Featured, Interviews, Issues, March 2017 | 0 comments

Cobus du Toit Flute Studio Interviews

  As part of our ongoing series of interviews with college flute studios across the United States, we interviewed Cobus du Toit, Assistant Professor of Flute at University of Massachusetts Amherst, and his students:  Isabelle Garland, Emily Kaplan, Alex Martin, Andrew Burden, Gloria Chiang, Katie Fejes, and Zachary Robarge We asked them about their passions, goals, inspirations, and advice they would offer to young students.      Cobus du Toit Assistant Professor of Flute, University of Massachusetts Amherst        Please list 3 pivotal moments that were essential to creating the artist that you've become.     As an undergraduate I desperately wanted to win the principal position with the National Youth Orchestra of South Africa. They scheduled a tour to Germany where we would perform Beethoven’s 5th Symphony in Bonn, Beethoven’s birthplace. Two failed auditions in previous years forced me to analyze and study my own playing very carefully. I knew that my playing had to show personality in addition to being fundamentally strong against the other players with naturally strong musical abilities. The preparation for that audition was a pivotal moment for my technical facility. Focused hard work paid off over raw musical talent. When an audience member was moved to tears during a recital, I realized performing had a therapeutic component that should be more important than our inner judgments about our own playing. We simply act as the conduit for bringing beauty back into the world. This realization transformed my playing and most of my performance anxiety went away since. Music is a subjective art form and you can’t base your self-worth as a musician on a panel’s opinion of you. A few years ago I performed as a finalist in a major competition and honestly thought that I would walk away victorious. When I did not receive any prize, of course I was very disappointment. After some reflection and discussion with the panel, I realized that I was able to convey musical gestures in exactly the way I wanted to and that was very empowering to me. From that point forward I committed to conjure up an emotional response from every single audience member, either positive or negative. The worst thing someone could say about a performance is that it was fine. I either want them to really dislike my artistic choices or fall in love with them.   What do you like best about performing and teaching? Performing – the sensation of improving everyday. I have become very interested in the art of practicing and how choices in the practice room influence my performances. The curiosity to improve my playing through skillful exploration has caused a major shift in my performing life. Recent repertoire choices also reflect this shift in the boundary of what I thought my limitations were. The idea of still improving in 30 years is exhilarating to me.   Teaching offers me the opportunity to become a more compassionate communicator. As educators we often meet students during times of frustration and self-doubt. When these emotional factors are combined with the stress of moving, making new friends and adjusting to college life, choice of words in lessons is incredibly important. It is possible to set a very high expectation without being dictatorial and I strive everyday to be more kind, compassionate and understanding...

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