Interviews

Marina Piccinini Artist Profile

Posted by on Mar 1, 2017 in Featured, Interviews, Issues, March 2017 | 0 comments

Marina Piccinini Artist Profile

  A daring artist with diverse musical interests, flutist Marina Piccinini is in demand worldwide as a soloist, chamber musician and recording artist. Internationally acclaimed for her interpretive skills, rich, expansive colors, technical command and elegant, compelling stage presence, Ms. Piccinini has been hailed by Gramophone as “the Heifetz of the flute."     Well-known for her commitment to new music and her history of first performances and commissions by some of today’s foremost composers, Ms. Piccinini gives the UK premiere of Pulitzer Prize winning composer Aaron Jay Kernis’s Flute Concerto, written and commissioned specifically for her, at London’s Royal Festival Hall with the London Philharmonic Orchestra, Andrés Orozco-Estrada conducting, this February 2017. This August 4, she performs the Summer Festival Premiere of the Kernis Concerto with conductor JoAnn Falletta and the Chautauqua Symphony Orchestra. She played the world premiere to great acclaim with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra in early 2016, with the Detroit Free Press stating, “Piccinini's gleaming virtuosity, including the variety of articulations and colors she drew from the flute, was a source of wonder," and American Record Guide, “she played it with absolutely breathtaking virtuosity.” This was following a highly acclaimed tour with the Vienna Symphony Orchestra the previous season, performing the Nielsen Flute Concerto under the baton of Jukka-Pekka Saraste. Highlights of recent seasons include a highly acclaimed tour with pianist Andreas Haefliger this past spring 2016; performances at London’s Wigmore Hall and Southbank Center; Tokyo’s Casals and Suntory Halls; the Seoul Arts Center; New York's Weill Hall at Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center's Alice Tully Hall, and Town Hall; the Mozartsaal in Vienna’s Konzerthaus, and at the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC.  Also of note is the world premiere performance of Matthew Hindson's House Music, a concerto for flute and orchestra, with Roberto Minczuk and the London Philharmonic Orchestra at London’s Queen Elizabeth Hall. While equally at home with contemporary and traditional works, Ms. Piccinini is deeply committed to music of the present, and expanding the repertoire for her instrument. She has given first performances of works by some of today’s foremost composers, including Michael Colgrass, Paquito D’Rivera, Matthew Hindson, Miguel Kertsman, Lukas Foss, Michael Torke, John Harbison, David Ludwig and Roberto Sierra. An active recording artist with CDs on the Avie, Claves, and ECM labels, Ms. Piccinini is the latest in a distinguished line of virtuosi to make the Paganini Caprices their own. Her new Paganini arrangements can be heard on her recent highly acclaimed recording for Avie. The printed music for Piccinini’s Paganini arrangements was published in autumn 2014 by Schott Music. Other recent recordings include Tre Voci’s acclaimed debut CD of works by Tōru Takemitsu, Claude Debussy and Sofia Gubaidulina on the ECM label; a DVD of Schoenberg’s Pierrot Lunaire from the Salzburg Festival, along with an accompanying documentary entitled Solar Plexus of Modernism; for Avie, the J.S.Bach’s complete flute sonatas and solo Partita in collaboration with the Brasil Guitar Duo, and the flute sonatas of Prokofiev and Franck with pianist Andreas Haefliger; and for Claves, Belle Epoque with pianist Anne Epperson, and sonatas by Bartok, Martinů, Schulhoff, Dohnanyi, and Taktakishvili with pianist Eva Kupiec. The first flutist to win the prestigious Avery Fisher Career Grant, Marina Piccinini’s career was launched when she won First Prize in the CBC Young Performers Competition...

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Interview with Brian Feliciano

Posted by on Mar 1, 2017 in Blog, Featured, Interviews, March 2017 | 0 comments

Interview with Brian Feliciano

Brian Feliciano started playing the flute when he was 9 years old  Today, this 14 year old is the winner of the Music Hero TV Show Competition in the Philippines.  Viviana Guzman interviews him and finds out the benefit of exposure on...

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Flutists of NAMM

Posted by on Feb 1, 2017 in Blog, Featured, February 2017, Interviews, Issues | 0 comments

Flutists of NAMM

The NAMM Show is one of the largest musical instrument trade shows, which takes place in Anaheim every January.  This was my 5th show and my first one as an exhibitor for Fluterscooter bags!   My favorite part of the show is catching up with old flute friends and meeting new ones. Everyone has a unique NAMM experience, and I got to catch up with a few flutists at the show to talk about their NAMM experience.     Josh Jonsson     Of all the music-industry shows around the world, NAMM has to be one of the biggest and most famous. For years I've wanted to go, and this year, I finally got my chance! 2017's NAMM show was my first one ever, and what an experience! It is by far the largest trade show I've ever been to (NFA will feel like a little village fair after this!), and though this is an article about flutists at NAMM, and most of you probably think of me as a flute player, I was actually there in my official capacity as a performing artist for Uebel clarinets. My primary function was to use my experience as a professional clarinetist and sort of "instrument wizard" to relate the features of these fantastic instruments that make them different from other makers to all the clarinetists who stopped by, and to demonstrate them whenever appropriate. It was an incredible few days, not only because I was able to, in a very direct and fulfilling way, work with quite a few fantastic players one-on-one and match them with the ideal instrument for them; but also because I ran into just about *everyone* I know in the entire music industry! It was like a huge party where everybody was too exhausted from working to be drunk, but still really happy to see each other and to be there. Can't wait for next year! (I also never want to hear another trumpet or trombone again)   Sarah Jane Hargis     I have always dreamed of attending the NAMM convention since I first heard about it MANY years ago. My experience over exceeded my expectations by far. I was so excited and honored to have had the opportunity to perform at NAMM on behalf of Earthquaker Devices and Altus/Azumi Flutes. So, what did I do exactly? I did what any gear junky would do! I walked onto the largest convention floor I have ever stepped foot on and hunted for Earthquaker Devices and Altus/Azumi Flutes. On my hunt, I was amazed at the tremendous amount of artists, artisans, and the sales staff of these small and large pieces of art we call instruments. Instruments of all sorts were alongside the various gadgets and tricks to make them or the player even better, enhanced or just plain fun toys. Throughout the weekend, I ran into some amazing artists performing their art right in front of me! I was constantly impressed and overjoyed to be around so much music! When I found the Earthquaker Devices stage I was in heaven!  They had every pedal they make on stage for me to play with! WOW! I was like a kid in a candy store trying to decide where to start.  On top of that, my performance with Lisa Bella Donna was...

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Flute Ensembles!

Posted by on Feb 1, 2017 in Featured, February 2017, Interviews, Issues | 0 comments

Flute Ensembles!

This month, we are featuring flute ensembles!  Flute ensembles and flute choirs are popular with adult professionals and amateurs alike, and we decided to feature some of our favorites.   Featuring:  Ayre Flutes, Silver Lining Flutes, and the Emissary Quartet.       Ayre Flutes   How long have you been together? Dare I say nearly ten years?! It’s a good job we all get along well!   How did you decide to form the ensemble? Like many of the best things, by accident really! We met at music college and one of us wanted to perform a piece for eight flutes (Golden Sunset by Dave Heath) so we all got together to help her out. We enjoyed the experience so much, particularly using the contra-bass flute, that we decided to carry on rehearsing and performing- inspired by Anna Noakes and Wissam Boustany we explored further repertoire, commissioned new works and the rest is history!   What is the focus of the group? Ayre Flutes is a contemporary flute ensemble and so we concentrate on new music: challenging expectations, utilising new techniques and styles, and commissioning new works. We like to take this fresh approach into our performance style. Every member brings different and complementary strengths to the ensemble, and we love collaborating and exploring innovative music with both composers and other performers.   What does the upcoming year look like for the ensemble? We are putting the final touches on an exciting new concert programme for 2017 and also a new commission or two with some of the brightest new British composers. Watch this space…!   How do you decide and divide business tasks between the group? We share out the tasks as a group, taking into account each member’s skills and interests… and everyone’s busy schedules of course! Everyone pitches in and we like to work as a team.       Emissary Quartet How long have you been together? Our quartet began in 2009 when the four original members met at Carnegie Mellon University, in the studio of Jeanne Baxtresser and Alberto Almarza. As Emissary Quartet, we have performed together for two and a half years.   How did you decide to form the ensemble? We began as an undergraduate student ensemble at Carnegie Mellon, formed by Professor Alberto Almarza. During the three years we performed together at CMU, we learned that we loved to play together and share new repertoire with audiences. After graduation, we all moved to different cities to pursue Master’s degrees. As we finished our MM’s, the idea of pursuing flute quartet as a professional ensemble started percolating through our conversations, and in October 2014 we did our first performance and teaching residency in Pittsburgh. That year, as we planned various projects and got our feet wet in this new way of working together long-distance, our mission and purpose coalesced in a new way.   What is the focus of the group? EQ has a three-part mission as an ensemble. Our first priority is to give high caliber performances that communicate deeply and show off the incredible versatility and expressivity of four flutes together. Second, we are dedicated to expanding the flute quartet repertoire through commissioning new works and creating our own arrangements. Finally, each of us has a passion for education,...

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Interview with Trevor Wye

Posted by on Feb 1, 2017 in Featured, February 2017, Interviews, Issues | 1 comment

Interview with Trevor Wye

Trevor Wye studied the flute privately both with Geoffrey Gilbert and the celebrated Marcel Moyse. He was a freelance orchestral and chamber music player on the London scene for many years and has made several solo recordings, notably on his specialist instrument, the flute d'amour, which he reintroduced in modern times.  His formative years were influenced by many players and singers, particularly Alfred Deller, Marcel Moyse and William  Bennett. He was formerly a Professor at the Guildhall School of Music, London and for 21 years at the Royal Northern College of Music in Manchester. Trevor Wye is the author the famous Practice Books for the flute, which have received world wide acclaim and have been translated into eleven other languages.  More recently, his highly praised biography of Marcel Moyse was published in English and in four other languages.     Please list 3 pivotal moments that were essential to creating the artist that you've become. Practice while young. Be nice to people. Have a lot of luck.   What do you like best about performing? Getting paid - and a beer afterwards.   And teaching?   Seeing students gain success in their careers.   What are your goals personally?   To stay alive and keep busy.   Professionally? To stop playing before I make a complete ass of myself.   What inspires you the most in life? Reading and hearing about the terrible events that happen in the world, the misery, starvation, disease, violence and conflict…and feeling very lucky.   What has been your greatest challenge? Keeping up with what's new in flutes and music.   Who were your music mentors?  and what did you learn from them? Geoffrey Gilbert. Discipline and careful practice. Marcel Moyse. Artistry - and looking beyond the notes.   Can you give us 5 quirky, secret, fun, (don't think too much about this) hobbies or passions? Making electronic things and musical instruments - and combining them. Debunking idiots. Animals. Watching performers perform. World history.   What 3 things would you offer as advice for a young flutist? Practice - and listen to your teacher. Be kind to people. Take care with your appearance, behaviour and...

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Skidmore College Flute Studio Interviews

Posted by on Feb 1, 2017 in Featured, February 2017, Interviews | 0 comments

Skidmore College Flute Studio Interviews

As part of our ongoing series of interviews with college flute studios across the United States, we interviewed Jan Vinci, Senior Artist in Residence at Skidmore College, and her students:    Michelle Kurz Kelsea Schimmel   We asked them about their passions, goals, inspirations, and advice they would offer to young students.    Jan Vinci Senior Artist in Residence, Skidmore College   First Prizewinner of England's International Electric Music Performance Competition and recipient of the Classical Recording Foundation Award, Jan Vinci has performed as a soloist and chamber musician in Carnegie, Alice Tully and Merkin Halls and for events such as the Blossom Festival, ICMC in The Netherlands, Electric Music Festival in England and Killington Music Festival. She is often the featured artist for flute club festivals and performs for NFA conventions. Vinci recorded four CD's on Albany Records. American Record Guide said this about Vinci's CD “Global Flutescape” ... "This is a fabulous recording. ... [Vinci] plays with control, color, and effortless technical facility. Her tone is beautiful, rich..." Vinci’s up-coming CD on Albany Records is “American FluteScape: A Tapestry of Premieres and Classics, collaborating with pianist Reiko Uchida and the New York Dream Orchestra. ” The commissioned premieres on this recording are Crow’s Nest for solo flute and TINGsha Bom-t-Bom-t- Bom for flute and orchestra by Mark Vinci  and Flute Poetic for flute and piano by Pulitzer Prize winner Jennifer Higdon.  Multi-Grammy winner Adam Abeshouse has been the recording engineer and producer for three of Vinci’s Albany Records CD’s. The other works are Poem by Griffes, Medieval Suite by Hoover and Acht Stücke by Hindemith. As an avid proponent of new works, Vinci’s recent projects also include Pulitzer Prize winner Long Zhou’s “Confluence for solo flute” (as part of the Flute New Music Consortium), Carleton Macy's "Autumn Sky: Fantasy for flute and concert band," and Tom Stoneman’s “A Day in the Life for flute, hip-hop artist and electronics.” Vinci holds a D.M.A. from The Juilliard School, M.M. from The Cleveland Institute of Music, and B.M. from Bowling Green State University, studying with Julius Baker, Samuel Baron, Maurice Sharp and Judith Bentley. Former faculty member of Queens College, Hofstra University and the Skidmore Flute Institute, Vinci is Senior Artist- in-Residence at Skidmore College and often teaches master classes at colleges and for flute festivals. Vinci served as President of the New York Flute Club. For a breadth of musical offerings by Ms. Vinci, please visit janvinci.com.   Please list 3 pivotal moments that were essential to creating the artist that you've become. 1. Meeting my first teacher, Judith Bentley. She opened me up to the world of flute playing, and even more importantly, to the interpretation of music of all eras. She had studied with the great William Kincaid. Her parents gave her a choice: they would pay for her to study in a Master's program, or to live in Philadelphia and study with William Kincaid for a year. She chose the later. During that period she won a concerto competition that awarded her to the opportunity to perform a concerto with the Philadelphia Orchestra! Later, in Tennessee, Mrs. B was principal flute of the Knoxville Symphony and taught flute at the University of Tennessee. My junior high band director Charles Hurt, an exceptional musician himself, set up an...

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University of Missouri Flute Studio Interviews

Posted by on Jan 2, 2017 in Featured, Interviews, January 2017 | 0 comments

University of Missouri Flute Studio Interviews

As part of our ongoing series of interviews with college flute studios across the United States, we interviewed Alice K. Dade, Assistant Professor of Flute at University of Missouri, and her students:   Ryan Koesterer, Breanna McCaughey, Kelariz Keshavarz, Gina Finazzo, and Karen Sanders.   We asked them about their passions, goals, inspirations, and advice they would offer to young students.    Alice K. Dade Assistant Professor of Flute, University of Missouri   Please list 3 pivotal moments that were essential to creating the artist that you've become. 1) I came home one summer after going to my first music festival and didn’t feel as if I was floating along in life any more. I started staying home to practice while my friends went out and I saw the weekend as more time to practice. I subscribed to Flute Talk and listened to so many recordings. I finally had a focus in my life! I figured out who I was. Unfortunately, I was a workaholic, ha! But I discovered I had drive when I really wanted something. I was fourteen. 2) I grew as a person because of living and playing in Sweden. I believe it is a true test of character when you are thrown into a completely different culture and environment. I continue to seek out similar opportunities because I know I will grow as a performer, person, and comedian (the funny culture-shock stories are endless) 3) When I auditioned for the job at The University of Missouri, I loved the process. As I worked with the students in a masterclass, I quickly came up with how I could help them achieve their goals. I couldn’t imagine leaving campus and never seeing them again. It felt like I had turned a corner. I loved teaching and this was a new chapter in my career. Who knew?!   What do you like best about teaching and performing? I always tell my students that when you are down or extremely frustrated, take it to the practice room. It can be so therapeutic. This is especially true in performance—all these emotions that we experience come through in our interpretations. If you walk off stage a little embarrassed, that’s usually a good sign. I can’t imagine not performing. I think I like teaching because it’s my way of contributing. I can help my students achieve their goals and, at the same time, challenge myself to be clear, creative, and methodical in my approach. Everyone is different, has different needs, and learns in a different way. I find it fascinating to discover what works best for each student.   What are your goals personally/professionally? I want to be happy. I want life to feel simple even though it can be chaotic. And I never want to stop laughing. Professionally, it’s actually pretty similar. I’ve had this idea for a chamber ensemble that I would really like to see happen. Stay tuned.   What inspires you most in life? Meeting interesting, funny people, who are able to listen and to talk.   What has been your greatest challenge? To live in the present.   Who were your music mentors? Oh my gosh…Claudia Schnitker, Eldred Spell, Tyra Gilb, Carol Winenc, Robert Langevin. They all come up in lessons with my students, suddenly, out of nowhere! I am...

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Penn State University Flute Studio Interviews

Posted by on Jan 2, 2017 in Featured, Interviews, January 2017 | 0 comments

Penn State University Flute Studio Interviews

As part of our ongoing series of interviews with college flute studios across the United States, we interviewed Naomi Seidman, Assistant Professor of Flute at Penn State University, and her students:   Amelia Amaya, Brooke Venturella, Faith Galbraith, Jessalyn Peterson, Jessica Sensenig, Jessica Smith, Jordana Schaeffer, Kathleen Holman, Kate Sellers, Katie Rudnik, Regina Martinicchio, Samantha Staffieri, Shiqun Ou, and Hurlie Yang.   We asked them about their passions, goals, inspirations, and advice they would offer to young students.    Naomi Seidman Assistant Professor of Flute, Penn State University   Please list 3 pivotal moments that were essential to creating the artist you have become. Summer Music Festivals: Getting into the Top Orchestra At 12 years old I was on my way to attend my first summer music festival! At the beginning of the festival we were all required to do an audition for ensemble placement purposes. I remember we had to perform the famous excerpt from Dvorak’s 8th Symphony. This was my first festival and my very first audition. I did not even know that people got nervous when they auditioned. I still had this innocent approach and I just played without inhibition. The audition panel was impressed and decided it would be best to throw me into the “top orchestra”.  I think at this point my ensemble experience was one honor band a teacher had sneaked me into. I had never played in an orchestra before and here I was about to play in one with kids twice my age. What an amazing experience and opportunity. I always played assistant first or assistant second in all the pieces. What a fantastic opportunity to learn from players so much more experienced than myself. I was able to learn about how to play in an orchestra in a relatively low-key manner. This experience was essential in creating the artist I have become. After this summer I knew that music would be a part of my life forever and I also became hooked on summer music festivals, which I did every summer until I graduated from college. These festivals shaped me as a musician. The exposed me to incredible private teachers, peers that were going through the same struggles and successes I was, and amazing chamber and orchestral repertoire. Majoring in Music in College: Holy Cow This is a LOT of Work Instead of study groups and long essays to write I spent most of my time in a practice room. The long hours I dedicated to practicing my flute have stayed with me and are far more influencing than any competition I won. The motivation and belief in myself that I needed to keep trying again and again has made me the artist I have become.  First Teaching Job: Pinch Me, Is this Real? In April of 2007 I was running on a treadmill at the UT-Austin gym thinking about getting married that upcoming June. My phone rang and I decided to answer it. It was a colleague of mine that played in a local orchestra with me. She informed me that Texas A&M University Kingsville had an open flute position and would I be interested in applying for it? It turned out that this job became my first teaching job at a University. Becoming a college flute professor has...

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Emmanuel Pahud Video Interview

Posted by on Dec 1, 2016 in Blog, Featured, Interviews | 0 comments

Emmanuel Pahud Video Interview

Emmanuel Pahud attended the Conservatoire de Paris (Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique de Paris) in France, studying with Michel Debost, Alain Marion, Pierre Artaud, and Christian Larde. Whilst studying, he won two major competitions, one in Duino 1988 and the other in Kobe in 1989. In 1988, Emmanuel also won the 2nd Prize at the International Scheveningen Music Competition in Scheveningen, Netherlands. Winning these competitions put Pahud in the forefront to become principal flautist in the Basel Radio Symphony, under the direction of Nello Santi which he obtained the position in 1989 whilst finishing his studies in Paris. He resigned from the orchestra in 1992. Pahud also held the principal flautist position at the Munich Philharmonic under Sergiu Celibidache. Pahud graduated at the age of 20 from the Conservatoire in 1990, obtaining the First Prize (Premier Prix). He then continued to advance his studies for the next two years; in style and interpretation with one of France's greatest flautists, Swiss-born Aurèle Nicolet who turned out to be his neighbour. In 1992, Nicolet prepared Pahud in an extensive 10 day rehearsal for both the Geneva International Music Competition, or le Concours International de Genève in September of that year and the audition for principal flautist of the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra (BPO) in October. He acknowledges achieving both the first prize at le Concours International de Genève and being appointed for the position at the age of 22 by BPO's conductor, Claudio Abbado to his experience with Nicolet. Enjoy The Flute View's Exclusive Interview!   Flute Chats: Emmanuel Pahud from Viviana Guzman TV on...

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Sound Healing: Wouter Kellerman Interview

Posted by on Dec 1, 2016 in December 2016, Featured, Interviews | 0 comments

Sound Healing: Wouter Kellerman Interview

Wouter Kellerman is a Grammy Award-winning South African flautist, producer and composer. Using his classical training as a foundation, Kellerman has focused his attention on World and Roots music, exploring the versatility of the instrument and fusing classical and contemporary sounds. A true crossover artist, Kellerman thrives on experimenting with the shades, textures and colours that his magic flute is capable of painting, and creatively blending them with other instrumentation and vocal sounds. Wouter has travelled extensively over the last few years, performing around the globe in places like Berlin, Shanghai, New York and Sydney, including sold-out concerts at Carnegie Hall in New York City and the Grammy Museum in LA in 2014.   Describe your flute and musical journey, flute background up until now. I started playing the flute when I was 10 years old and played mostly classical music for most of my career. I listened very widely though from a young age to other genres like African music, Mediterranean music, jazz and pop. When I left school, I didn’t have money to study, but could get a bursary to study Engineering, so I ended up studying and working back my bursary in Electronic Engineering, while passionately carrying on playing the flute. Through that process I was the principal flutist of the South African National Youth Orchestra and travelled all over the world during summer times to attend master classes by teachers like William Bennett, Trevor Wye, Julius Baker, Peter-Lukas Graf and many more J I still think my classical background is the most important part and the essence of my flute playing. After trying many times, I finally was able to make the switch from engineer to full-time musician about ten years ago, and at that time started writing my own music and venturing beyond the classical borders. Highlights since then have been a Grammy win, six SAMA wins (South African Music Award, the SA equivalent of the Grammy), performances all over the world at venues like Carnegie Hall and the Kennedy Centre, as well as performing for 700 million people at the Soccer World Cup Closing Ceremony J I am very lucky to have a multi-faceted career – I am a World/Roots/Folk Music artist, but still play regular classical music concerts and cross over to the New Age genre as well.   What is sound healing, and how have you made it a part of your career? I think of sound healing as spreading good energy through music, and that is actually the philosophy behind all of my music – I prefer to make music that is moving, positive and uplifting. More specifically, we run sessions called ‘Sound Journeys’, where we focus specifically on the healing aspect of the music, and that forms part of my performance diary.   Current projects coming up?   I have just finished playing on and co-producing Ricky Kej’s project ‘Shanti Samsara, World Music for Environmental Consciousness’. The album is focused on creating awareness around how important it is in these times to take care of the world we live in. As part of this, I wrote a piece called ‘Breathe’ for solo flute and bass flute, for the rainforests – have a look here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qeQDZISmLkI. The project has been released already, have a look here for all the music and videos:...

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