Interviews

Skidmore College Flute Studio Interviews

Posted by on Feb 1, 2017 in Featured, February 2017, Interviews | 0 comments

Skidmore College Flute Studio Interviews

As part of our ongoing series of interviews with college flute studios across the United States, we interviewed Jan Vinci, Senior Artist in Residence at Skidmore College, and her students:    Michelle Kurz Kelsea Schimmel   We asked them about their passions, goals, inspirations, and advice they would offer to young students.    Jan Vinci Senior Artist in Residence, Skidmore College   First Prizewinner of England's International Electric Music Performance Competition and recipient of the Classical Recording Foundation Award, Jan Vinci has performed as a soloist and chamber musician in Carnegie, Alice Tully and Merkin Halls and for events such as the Blossom Festival, ICMC in The Netherlands, Electric Music Festival in England and Killington Music Festival. She is often the featured artist for flute club festivals and performs for NFA conventions. Vinci recorded four CD's on Albany Records. American Record Guide said this about Vinci's CD “Global Flutescape” ... "This is a fabulous recording. ... [Vinci] plays with control, color, and effortless technical facility. Her tone is beautiful, rich..." Vinci’s up-coming CD on Albany Records is “American FluteScape: A Tapestry of Premieres and Classics, collaborating with pianist Reiko Uchida and the New York Dream Orchestra. ” The commissioned premieres on this recording are Crow’s Nest for solo flute and TINGsha Bom-t-Bom-t- Bom for flute and orchestra by Mark Vinci  and Flute Poetic for flute and piano by Pulitzer Prize winner Jennifer Higdon.  Multi-Grammy winner Adam Abeshouse has been the recording engineer and producer for three of Vinci’s Albany Records CD’s. The other works are Poem by Griffes, Medieval Suite by Hoover and Acht Stücke by Hindemith. As an avid proponent of new works, Vinci’s recent projects also include Pulitzer Prize winner Long Zhou’s “Confluence for solo flute” (as part of the Flute New Music Consortium), Carleton Macy's "Autumn Sky: Fantasy for flute and concert band," and Tom Stoneman’s “A Day in the Life for flute, hip-hop artist and electronics.” Vinci holds a D.M.A. from The Juilliard School, M.M. from The Cleveland Institute of Music, and B.M. from Bowling Green State University, studying with Julius Baker, Samuel Baron, Maurice Sharp and Judith Bentley. Former faculty member of Queens College, Hofstra University and the Skidmore Flute Institute, Vinci is Senior Artist- in-Residence at Skidmore College and often teaches master classes at colleges and for flute festivals. Vinci served as President of the New York Flute Club. For a breadth of musical offerings by Ms. Vinci, please visit janvinci.com.   Please list 3 pivotal moments that were essential to creating the artist that you've become. 1. Meeting my first teacher, Judith Bentley. She opened me up to the world of flute playing, and even more importantly, to the interpretation of music of all eras. She had studied with the great William Kincaid. Her parents gave her a choice: they would pay for her to study in a Master's program, or to live in Philadelphia and study with William Kincaid for a year. She chose the later. During that period she won a concerto competition that awarded her to the opportunity to perform a concerto with the Philadelphia Orchestra! Later, in Tennessee, Mrs. B was principal flute of the Knoxville Symphony and taught flute at the University of Tennessee. My junior high band director Charles Hurt, an exceptional musician himself, set up an...

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University of Missouri Flute Studio Interviews

Posted by on Jan 2, 2017 in Featured, Interviews, January 2017 | 0 comments

University of Missouri Flute Studio Interviews

As part of our ongoing series of interviews with college flute studios across the United States, we interviewed Alice K. Dade, Assistant Professor of Flute at University of Missouri, and her students:   Ryan Koesterer, Breanna McCaughey, Kelariz Keshavarz, Gina Finazzo, and Karen Sanders.   We asked them about their passions, goals, inspirations, and advice they would offer to young students.    Alice K. Dade Assistant Professor of Flute, University of Missouri   Please list 3 pivotal moments that were essential to creating the artist that you've become. 1) I came home one summer after going to my first music festival and didn’t feel as if I was floating along in life any more. I started staying home to practice while my friends went out and I saw the weekend as more time to practice. I subscribed to Flute Talk and listened to so many recordings. I finally had a focus in my life! I figured out who I was. Unfortunately, I was a workaholic, ha! But I discovered I had drive when I really wanted something. I was fourteen. 2) I grew as a person because of living and playing in Sweden. I believe it is a true test of character when you are thrown into a completely different culture and environment. I continue to seek out similar opportunities because I know I will grow as a performer, person, and comedian (the funny culture-shock stories are endless) 3) When I auditioned for the job at The University of Missouri, I loved the process. As I worked with the students in a masterclass, I quickly came up with how I could help them achieve their goals. I couldn’t imagine leaving campus and never seeing them again. It felt like I had turned a corner. I loved teaching and this was a new chapter in my career. Who knew?!   What do you like best about teaching and performing? I always tell my students that when you are down or extremely frustrated, take it to the practice room. It can be so therapeutic. This is especially true in performance—all these emotions that we experience come through in our interpretations. If you walk off stage a little embarrassed, that’s usually a good sign. I can’t imagine not performing. I think I like teaching because it’s my way of contributing. I can help my students achieve their goals and, at the same time, challenge myself to be clear, creative, and methodical in my approach. Everyone is different, has different needs, and learns in a different way. I find it fascinating to discover what works best for each student.   What are your goals personally/professionally? I want to be happy. I want life to feel simple even though it can be chaotic. And I never want to stop laughing. Professionally, it’s actually pretty similar. I’ve had this idea for a chamber ensemble that I would really like to see happen. Stay tuned.   What inspires you most in life? Meeting interesting, funny people, who are able to listen and to talk.   What has been your greatest challenge? To live in the present.   Who were your music mentors? Oh my gosh…Claudia Schnitker, Eldred Spell, Tyra Gilb, Carol Winenc, Robert Langevin. They all come up in lessons with my students, suddenly, out of nowhere! I am...

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Penn State University Flute Studio Interviews

Posted by on Jan 2, 2017 in Featured, Interviews, January 2017 | 0 comments

Penn State University Flute Studio Interviews

As part of our ongoing series of interviews with college flute studios across the United States, we interviewed Naomi Seidman, Assistant Professor of Flute at Penn State University, and her students:   Amelia Amaya, Brooke Venturella, Faith Galbraith, Jessalyn Peterson, Jessica Sensenig, Jessica Smith, Jordana Schaeffer, Kathleen Holman, Kate Sellers, Katie Rudnik, Regina Martinicchio, Samantha Staffieri, Shiqun Ou, and Hurlie Yang.   We asked them about their passions, goals, inspirations, and advice they would offer to young students.    Naomi Seidman Assistant Professor of Flute, Penn State University   Please list 3 pivotal moments that were essential to creating the artist you have become. Summer Music Festivals: Getting into the Top Orchestra At 12 years old I was on my way to attend my first summer music festival! At the beginning of the festival we were all required to do an audition for ensemble placement purposes. I remember we had to perform the famous excerpt from Dvorak’s 8th Symphony. This was my first festival and my very first audition. I did not even know that people got nervous when they auditioned. I still had this innocent approach and I just played without inhibition. The audition panel was impressed and decided it would be best to throw me into the “top orchestra”.  I think at this point my ensemble experience was one honor band a teacher had sneaked me into. I had never played in an orchestra before and here I was about to play in one with kids twice my age. What an amazing experience and opportunity. I always played assistant first or assistant second in all the pieces. What a fantastic opportunity to learn from players so much more experienced than myself. I was able to learn about how to play in an orchestra in a relatively low-key manner. This experience was essential in creating the artist I have become. After this summer I knew that music would be a part of my life forever and I also became hooked on summer music festivals, which I did every summer until I graduated from college. These festivals shaped me as a musician. The exposed me to incredible private teachers, peers that were going through the same struggles and successes I was, and amazing chamber and orchestral repertoire. Majoring in Music in College: Holy Cow This is a LOT of Work Instead of study groups and long essays to write I spent most of my time in a practice room. The long hours I dedicated to practicing my flute have stayed with me and are far more influencing than any competition I won. The motivation and belief in myself that I needed to keep trying again and again has made me the artist I have become.  First Teaching Job: Pinch Me, Is this Real? In April of 2007 I was running on a treadmill at the UT-Austin gym thinking about getting married that upcoming June. My phone rang and I decided to answer it. It was a colleague of mine that played in a local orchestra with me. She informed me that Texas A&M University Kingsville had an open flute position and would I be interested in applying for it? It turned out that this job became my first teaching job at a University. Becoming a college flute professor has...

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Emmanuel Pahud Video Interview

Posted by on Dec 1, 2016 in Blog, Featured, Interviews | 0 comments

Emmanuel Pahud Video Interview

Emmanuel Pahud attended the Conservatoire de Paris (Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique de Paris) in France, studying with Michel Debost, Alain Marion, Pierre Artaud, and Christian Larde. Whilst studying, he won two major competitions, one in Duino 1988 and the other in Kobe in 1989. In 1988, Emmanuel also won the 2nd Prize at the International Scheveningen Music Competition in Scheveningen, Netherlands. Winning these competitions put Pahud in the forefront to become principal flautist in the Basel Radio Symphony, under the direction of Nello Santi which he obtained the position in 1989 whilst finishing his studies in Paris. He resigned from the orchestra in 1992. Pahud also held the principal flautist position at the Munich Philharmonic under Sergiu Celibidache. Pahud graduated at the age of 20 from the Conservatoire in 1990, obtaining the First Prize (Premier Prix). He then continued to advance his studies for the next two years; in style and interpretation with one of France's greatest flautists, Swiss-born Aurèle Nicolet who turned out to be his neighbour. In 1992, Nicolet prepared Pahud in an extensive 10 day rehearsal for both the Geneva International Music Competition, or le Concours International de Genève in September of that year and the audition for principal flautist of the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra (BPO) in October. He acknowledges achieving both the first prize at le Concours International de Genève and being appointed for the position at the age of 22 by BPO's conductor, Claudio Abbado to his experience with Nicolet. Enjoy The Flute View's Exclusive Interview!   Flute Chats: Emmanuel Pahud from Viviana Guzman TV on...

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Sound Healing: Wouter Kellerman Interview

Posted by on Dec 1, 2016 in December 2016, Featured, Interviews | 0 comments

Sound Healing: Wouter Kellerman Interview

Wouter Kellerman is a Grammy Award-winning South African flautist, producer and composer. Using his classical training as a foundation, Kellerman has focused his attention on World and Roots music, exploring the versatility of the instrument and fusing classical and contemporary sounds. A true crossover artist, Kellerman thrives on experimenting with the shades, textures and colours that his magic flute is capable of painting, and creatively blending them with other instrumentation and vocal sounds. Wouter has travelled extensively over the last few years, performing around the globe in places like Berlin, Shanghai, New York and Sydney, including sold-out concerts at Carnegie Hall in New York City and the Grammy Museum in LA in 2014.   Describe your flute and musical journey, flute background up until now. I started playing the flute when I was 10 years old and played mostly classical music for most of my career. I listened very widely though from a young age to other genres like African music, Mediterranean music, jazz and pop. When I left school, I didn’t have money to study, but could get a bursary to study Engineering, so I ended up studying and working back my bursary in Electronic Engineering, while passionately carrying on playing the flute. Through that process I was the principal flutist of the South African National Youth Orchestra and travelled all over the world during summer times to attend master classes by teachers like William Bennett, Trevor Wye, Julius Baker, Peter-Lukas Graf and many more J I still think my classical background is the most important part and the essence of my flute playing. After trying many times, I finally was able to make the switch from engineer to full-time musician about ten years ago, and at that time started writing my own music and venturing beyond the classical borders. Highlights since then have been a Grammy win, six SAMA wins (South African Music Award, the SA equivalent of the Grammy), performances all over the world at venues like Carnegie Hall and the Kennedy Centre, as well as performing for 700 million people at the Soccer World Cup Closing Ceremony J I am very lucky to have a multi-faceted career – I am a World/Roots/Folk Music artist, but still play regular classical music concerts and cross over to the New Age genre as well.   What is sound healing, and how have you made it a part of your career? I think of sound healing as spreading good energy through music, and that is actually the philosophy behind all of my music – I prefer to make music that is moving, positive and uplifting. More specifically, we run sessions called ‘Sound Journeys’, where we focus specifically on the healing aspect of the music, and that forms part of my performance diary.   Current projects coming up?   I have just finished playing on and co-producing Ricky Kej’s project ‘Shanti Samsara, World Music for Environmental Consciousness’. The album is focused on creating awareness around how important it is in these times to take care of the world we live in. As part of this, I wrote a piece called ‘Breathe’ for solo flute and bass flute, for the rainforests – have a look here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qeQDZISmLkI. The project has been released already, have a look here for all the music and videos:...

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Sound Healing: Suzanne Teng Interview

Posted by on Dec 1, 2016 in December 2016, Featured, Interviews | 0 comments

Sound Healing: Suzanne Teng Interview

Suzanne Teng, M. Mus. is a flutist, recording artist, composer, and teacher originally from Berkeley, California.  She received her master’s degree in music from Boston University’s School for the Arts and after traveling adventures across the globe, furthered her graduate studies at UCLA’s Department of Ethnomusicology where she completed the coursework for the Ph.D. focusing on music and healing.  She is currently based in Los Angeles where she performs with her band Suzanne Teng & Mystic Journey, records for soundtracks and sound recordings and presents music workshops.   Describe your flute and musical journey, flute background up until now. I started playing the flute in the 6th grade.  I received my masters degree in flute performance from Boston University School for the Arts where I studied with Leone Buyse. I had the typical classical flutist’s life of teaching, freelancing and practicing. One day, a cellist in the Boston Symphony invited me to a weekend retreat with about 20 people.  We “jammed, “ painted, and danced, and it was there I met an African drummer and experienced the power of the drum. My life turned upside down.  I started to improvise and play non classical music for the first time in my life. I rediscovered my Chinese flute collection and started to listen to world music  This led me to wanting to dive further into world music so I moved to Los Angeles where I worked on a Ph.D. at UCLA in ethnomusicology.  It was an exciting program where I played in numerous ensembles such as the Near East Ensemble, the salsa band, and the gamelan ensemble.  From there, I went to numerous life changing world music concerts ranging from bansuri concerts in Indian homes and Pakistani Qawwali devotional concerts at local high school gyms, to large African festivals in downtown plazas. In Los Angeles, I started playing in all sorts of bands...rock, reggae, pop, new age….it was a blast.  I was teaching at Lark in the Morning Camp in Mendocino in the summers where I was exposed to so much incredible world music and lots of crazy flutes and wind instruments. Putting all these various musical experiences led me to having a career performing and recording on low and world flutes. I’ve gotten to play on some great film, television, and commercial scores and have recorded on lots of wide ranging projects, including several with my own bands. I gravitated towards holistic festivals, and spiritual gatherings and have  played at really interesting events with wonderful teachers such as Deepak Chopra, Marianne Williamson and the poet David Whyte.  Our band performed at the Dalai Lama’s World Festival of Sacred Music Festivals and other great sacred music events. I now perform with my band “Mystic Journey,” still do recording projects and  teach workshops and clinics on the low and world flutes. It’s been a colorful journey, and one that I never could have predicted or planned.   What is sound healing, and how have you made a career out of it?  There are many modalities of sound healing these days, from toning, using tuning forks, gongs and Tibetan bowls to Shamanic chanting and drumming. When I was working on my Ph.D. in ethnomusicology, my area of focus was music and healing.  I loved  researching trance and the use of music in...

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Sound Healing: Bodhi Setchko Interview

Posted by on Dec 1, 2016 in December 2016, Featured, Interviews | 0 comments

Sound Healing: Bodhi Setchko Interview

Bodhi Setchko is a multi-talented shamanic flute healer, songwriter, composer, recording artist,producer, teacher & professional band leader. He has been performing and providing music for special events, weddings, workshops and church services for over 25 years, has produced 9 albums of original music and is the founder of 2 recording/touring bands,"CRYSTAL WIND" and "RHYTHM MATRIX". Bodhi specializes in providing musical soundscapes for events and workshops. His sensitivity to group energy combined with his broad range of musical and healing talents (Reiki, Breathwork, Meditation), enables him to tune in to, enhance and bring out the feeling tone present at any event, leaving people feeling inspired, uplifted & fulfilled.   Describe your flute and musical journey. Your flute background up until now. How did you get here with the flute? I was studying piano, trumpet and the accordion every week from 8 years old until I was about 14. Then I let go of the trumpet, switched over to flute and started practicing about three hours a day. I was studying jazz and classical flute in high school and then studied East Indian flute for a brief time with Sachdev at the Ali Akbar College of Music. After high school I went to Berklee College of Music for a short time in the East Coast but ended up during the 1970’s at Sonoma State studying classical flute. I played in the orchestra and studied for a short time with Paul E. Renzi, the principle flutist of the San Francisco Symphony at the time. I emulated the style of Paul Horn and got a chance to study with him for a brief period. I was also very interested in world music, listening to Japanese Shakuhachi, Pan Flute of the Andes, and the Bamboo Bansuri of East India. One Summer I studied the Indonesian Suling flute as part of a Gamelan orchestra. I explored other musical instruments, the auto harp, the harmonica, the guitar and I took voice lessons for many years. That helped the flute playing and the flute playing helped the voice training. I consider the flute like a voice and I like to play the flute like I'm singing. I was writing songs, singer-songwriter style. I experimented with different areas of music and yet I would always come back to the flute. To this day it always feels the most poignant of instruments for me.   Who inspires you as a flutist and musician?  (doesn't have to be a musician) Paul Horn. As a teenager I would listen to the “Inside The Taj Mahal” recording almost every night. It Just mesmerized me and I wanted to play like that. I'm grateful that I got to study with him later in life. I learned a few key techniques from him that really helped me develop my signature sound. Jethro Tull. Ian Anderson was another big influence, listening to him play the flute like a locomotive, expressively and energetically, was very exciting. Arthur Hills was my first college music professor and he has inspired me in countless ways over the years. Recently he helped me edit my book, “Tao Of Music”. I took a day long master class with Sir James Galway. From him I picked the power of a disciplined practice regimen. His technique is phenomenal. Also I would say being...

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Sound Healing: Sherry Finzer Interview

Posted by on Dec 1, 2016 in December 2016, Featured, Interviews | 0 comments

Sound Healing: Sherry Finzer Interview

Sherry Finzer is an international award-winning American flutist, composer, performer, and recording artist for Heart Dance Records. She is known for her variety of musical styles, and performs as a Pearl Flute and Guo Flute Performing Artist. Musically, Finzer has evolved from a classical, competitive flutist to recording acclaimed new age music albums, including Flute Flight, which won the ZMR Award for 2015 Best Relaxation/Meditation Album.  Sherry says, “I was drawn to new age music because it helps people with healing and I have learned how much people can be affected in a positive way by music.” We asked her about her career in sound healing, and she responded with the following article.   Like many of us, I started playing the flute in elementary school band. I am often asked what drew me to the flute, and the memory I have is of staying after school one day to sign up for band and try out the instruments. Being drawn to shiny objects (LOL), I found myself selecting the pretty silver flute, and also remember thinking it would be easy to carry. The size of the instrument was easy to carry for most of my career, until I started playing the low flutes and performing my own original music. Now I am lugging to shows, a whole SUV full of sound equipment, tables, CD’s and several flutes, including the C, alto, bass and sometimes the contrabass! My journey as a musician has come and go over the years. After school I decided to get married and explore other employment opportunities, and then raise two children who are now grown adults. Music came and went for me during those years. I dabbled in it with part-time teaching and performing, winning several local and national flute competitions, playing in local orchestras and bands. With a move to Arizona from Rochester, NY when my youngest was in high school, I decided to jump in full steam ahead. I looked for performance opportunities in Phoenix, and eventually wound up playing many different styles and genres of music here with multiple guitarists, pianists, and harpists. These musicians I performed with helped me along my journey by encouraging me to learn to improvise, be it jazz, world or new age music. I was also encouraged along the way to stop reading sheet music and just play by ear. That alone opened up a whole new world of opportunity for me. Not only did I feel like I was playing from the heart now, and saying what I wanted to say with my flute, it gave me the ability to get up on stage with no prior rehearsal and be able to perform with world class musicians. As far as heading into the New Age realm, I felt I needed to explore that after a woman who had purchased one of my previous classical/world CD’s had told me how that music calmed her and stopped her hands from the constant shaking that she dealt with. That is when I first realized that music could have a positive, healing effect. In our time now, the world is going at such an incredibly fast pace, that it is inherent for our health that we find ways to slow down our minds and bodies. The definition of sound healing...

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UNC Greensboro Flute Studio Interviews

Posted by on Dec 1, 2016 in December 2016, Featured, Interviews | 0 comments

UNC Greensboro Flute Studio Interviews

As part of our ongoing series of interviews with college flute studios across the United States, we interviewed Erika Boysen, Assistant Professor of Flute at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, and her students:   Sharneisha Joyner, Stephany Saunders, Noah Cline, Abby Simoneau, Mandy Mitchell, Krisztina Der, Hyunsu Yoon, Madison Libby, Janine Neprud, Holly Boucher, Emily Krestar, Elizabeth Church, Elena Gagon, Amy Karnes, and Victoria Blalock.   We asked them about their passions, goals, inspirations, and advice they would offer to young students.    Erika Boysen Assistant Professor of Flute Erika Boysen is the Assistant Professor of Flute at the University of North Carolina Greensboro.  Dr. Boysen received her DMA from the University of Michigan, MM from the New England Conservatory and BM from the University of North Carolina School of the Arts.   Please list 3 pivotal moments that were essential to creating the artist that you've become. To be honest, I don’t think singular moments shape us into the artists and people we become.  We are the product of countless experiences, interactions, decisions and challenges over the course of a lifetime.  But, if I had to choose three poignant moments from all my years, perhaps the most pivotal was meeting my first flute teacher, Kimberly Helton.  She was kind and nurturing and she thoroughly understood me and my style of learning.  Kim is a gifted teacher and without her significant and early influence I wouldn't have pursued a career in music. The summer after my eighth grade year I attended Interlochen Arts Camp for the first time. Playing in an orchestra and being surrounded by like-minded peers was new to me. My very first orchestral rehearsal was with the Intermediate Symphony Orchestra that summer and this experience had a profound impact on my life.  Our first rehearsal began with the last movement of Rimsky-Korsakov’s Cappricio Espagnol.  The conductor gave the downbeat and with the first few bars I felt electrified and a bit paralyzed.  I could barely look at my music and though the flute was up to my face, I was too overwhelmed to play.  The conductor stopped the orchestra and asked if I was lost. Indeed, I was completely lost in the captivating orchestral sound of that ensemble. It was one of the most powerful moments of my childhood. Improvisation used to terrify me.  I remember excusing myself to, “use the restroom”, “go to the doctor’s office” or “feed the cat” to avoid any requirement to improvise, vocally or instrumentally.  Shortly after arriving in Boston to begin my Masters degree, I attended a pizza party that introduced the Music in Education program at NEC.   As I approached the hall where the “meeting” was to take place I heard a lot of drumming.  “Uh oh, this sounds risky- I better turn around and go the other direction”, I thought to myself.  Fortunately, I kept walking and met Warren Senders, the man who introduced me to the world of free improvisation.  The meeting consisted of 30 minutes of drumming with plastic tubes. I’d never felt more free.  I proceeded to take his improvisation class that semester.  What I learned through improvisation I transfered to life in general.  Letting go and being okay with not knowing what notes to play or when to play them encouraged me...

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Royal Northern College of Music Flute Studio Interviews

Posted by on Dec 1, 2016 in December 2016, Featured, Interviews | 0 comments

Royal Northern College of Music Flute Studio Interviews

As part of our ongoing series of interviews with college flute studios across the United States and abroad, we interviewed Associate Tutor of Flute at the Royal Northern College of Music Noemi Gyori and her students:   Ruby Howells, Felix Blake, Imogen Royce, and Serin Jung   We asked them about their passions, goals, inspirations, and advice they would offer to young students.      Noemi Gyori Associate Tutor at the Royal Northern College of Music   Noemi Gyori is Associate Tutor at the Royal Northern College of Music and is pursuing her doctorate in performance at the Royal Academy of Music in London. She studied with Andras Adorjan, Barbara Gisler-Haase and Henrik Prohle. She is equally in demand as a soloist, chamber musician and pedagogue.   Please list 3 pivotal moments that were essential to creating the artist that you've become. The moment when I received my first flute and the incredible feeling and enjoyment I experienced playing on it right away. I knew instantly that it is going to be my life. Performing in the Vienna State Opera, alongside the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra’s musicians. Every single time I played with them, I hugely enjoyed the very special musical expression, the amazing concentration and speed of reaction each musician was playing with. Their musicianship has given me a great source of inspiration and confidence. Through launching and developing The Classical Flute and Guitar Project (www.classicalfluteandguitar.com) I have realized how much you can discover and grow as an artist, once you devote yourself and focus your attention on a specific repertoire or artistic idea.   What do you like best about performing and teaching? While playing the flute I feel that I enter a completely different world: I am able to forget about the everyday worries, dismiss my mind from things that bother me (even physical pain) and let go of any sense of time. This is the amazing and liberating psychological state that Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi identifies as Flow. It is simply magical, when you are able to share and experience this with your audience together! Ilona Kárász, my first flute teacher in Hungary has regularly made her students teach each other things they have already mastered. This means, I have been teaching youngsters from the age of 6 or 7, first explaining scales, breathing and short songs to them. Thanks to Ilona’s methods, sharing my knowledge has become a constant source of joy and eventually a vital part of my career. The most gripping for me in teaching is the kind of teamwork experienced through the lessons, which results in mutual growth of both student and professor and has a long lasting effect on the career of young professionals, helping them reaching their fullest potential and goals.   What are your goals personally?  Professionally? I guess these two interlock with each other: my goal is to continue building a beautiful family with my conductor husband, Gergely Madaras and to carry forward on my path as a performing artist, never losing the enthusiasm and devotion to what I do. I hope that with my work and lifestyle, I will once be able to contribute to the list of influential women performers, who prove that it is possible to build significant careers, while having a family as well.   What inspires you...

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