Interviews

Sound Healing: Wouter Kellerman Interview

Posted by on Dec 1, 2016 in December 2016, Featured, Interviews | 0 comments

Sound Healing: Wouter Kellerman Interview

Wouter Kellerman is a Grammy Award-winning South African flautist, producer and composer. Using his classical training as a foundation, Kellerman has focused his attention on World and Roots music, exploring the versatility of the instrument and fusing classical and contemporary sounds. A true crossover artist, Kellerman thrives on experimenting with the shades, textures and colours that his magic flute is capable of painting, and creatively blending them with other instrumentation and vocal sounds. Wouter has travelled extensively over the last few years, performing around the globe in places like Berlin, Shanghai, New York and Sydney, including sold-out concerts at Carnegie Hall in New York City and the Grammy Museum in LA in 2014.   Describe your flute and musical journey, flute background up until now. I started playing the flute when I was 10 years old and played mostly classical music for most of my career. I listened very widely though from a young age to other genres like African music, Mediterranean music, jazz and pop. When I left school, I didn’t have money to study, but could get a bursary to study Engineering, so I ended up studying and working back my bursary in Electronic Engineering, while passionately carrying on playing the flute. Through that process I was the principal flutist of the South African National Youth Orchestra and travelled all over the world during summer times to attend master classes by teachers like William Bennett, Trevor Wye, Julius Baker, Peter-Lukas Graf and many more J I still think my classical background is the most important part and the essence of my flute playing. After trying many times, I finally was able to make the switch from engineer to full-time musician about ten years ago, and at that time started writing my own music and venturing beyond the classical borders. Highlights since then have been a Grammy win, six SAMA wins (South African Music Award, the SA equivalent of the Grammy), performances all over the world at venues like Carnegie Hall and the Kennedy Centre, as well as performing for 700 million people at the Soccer World Cup Closing Ceremony J I am very lucky to have a multi-faceted career – I am a World/Roots/Folk Music artist, but still play regular classical music concerts and cross over to the New Age genre as well.   What is sound healing, and how have you made it a part of your career? I think of sound healing as spreading good energy through music, and that is actually the philosophy behind all of my music – I prefer to make music that is moving, positive and uplifting. More specifically, we run sessions called ‘Sound Journeys’, where we focus specifically on the healing aspect of the music, and that forms part of my performance diary.   Current projects coming up?   I have just finished playing on and co-producing Ricky Kej’s project ‘Shanti Samsara, World Music for Environmental Consciousness’. The album is focused on creating awareness around how important it is in these times to take care of the world we live in. As part of this, I wrote a piece called ‘Breathe’ for solo flute and bass flute, for the rainforests – have a look here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qeQDZISmLkI. The project has been released already, have a look here for all the music and videos:...

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Sound Healing: Suzanne Teng Interview

Posted by on Dec 1, 2016 in December 2016, Featured, Interviews | 0 comments

Sound Healing: Suzanne Teng Interview

Suzanne Teng, M. Mus. is a flutist, recording artist, composer, and teacher originally from Berkeley, California.  She received her master’s degree in music from Boston University’s School for the Arts and after traveling adventures across the globe, furthered her graduate studies at UCLA’s Department of Ethnomusicology where she completed the coursework for the Ph.D. focusing on music and healing.  She is currently based in Los Angeles where she performs with her band Suzanne Teng & Mystic Journey, records for soundtracks and sound recordings and presents music workshops.   Describe your flute and musical journey, flute background up until now. I started playing the flute in the 6th grade.  I received my masters degree in flute performance from Boston University School for the Arts where I studied with Leone Buyse. I had the typical classical flutist’s life of teaching, freelancing and practicing. One day, a cellist in the Boston Symphony invited me to a weekend retreat with about 20 people.  We “jammed, “ painted, and danced, and it was there I met an African drummer and experienced the power of the drum. My life turned upside down.  I started to improvise and play non classical music for the first time in my life. I rediscovered my Chinese flute collection and started to listen to world music  This led me to wanting to dive further into world music so I moved to Los Angeles where I worked on a Ph.D. at UCLA in ethnomusicology.  It was an exciting program where I played in numerous ensembles such as the Near East Ensemble, the salsa band, and the gamelan ensemble.  From there, I went to numerous life changing world music concerts ranging from bansuri concerts in Indian homes and Pakistani Qawwali devotional concerts at local high school gyms, to large African festivals in downtown plazas. In Los Angeles, I started playing in all sorts of bands...rock, reggae, pop, new age….it was a blast.  I was teaching at Lark in the Morning Camp in Mendocino in the summers where I was exposed to so much incredible world music and lots of crazy flutes and wind instruments. Putting all these various musical experiences led me to having a career performing and recording on low and world flutes. I’ve gotten to play on some great film, television, and commercial scores and have recorded on lots of wide ranging projects, including several with my own bands. I gravitated towards holistic festivals, and spiritual gatherings and have  played at really interesting events with wonderful teachers such as Deepak Chopra, Marianne Williamson and the poet David Whyte.  Our band performed at the Dalai Lama’s World Festival of Sacred Music Festivals and other great sacred music events. I now perform with my band “Mystic Journey,” still do recording projects and  teach workshops and clinics on the low and world flutes. It’s been a colorful journey, and one that I never could have predicted or planned.   What is sound healing, and how have you made a career out of it?  There are many modalities of sound healing these days, from toning, using tuning forks, gongs and Tibetan bowls to Shamanic chanting and drumming. When I was working on my Ph.D. in ethnomusicology, my area of focus was music and healing.  I loved  researching trance and the use of music in...

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Sound Healing: Bodhi Setchko Interview

Posted by on Dec 1, 2016 in December 2016, Featured, Interviews | 0 comments

Sound Healing: Bodhi Setchko Interview

Bodhi Setchko is a multi-talented shamanic flute healer, songwriter, composer, recording artist,producer, teacher & professional band leader. He has been performing and providing music for special events, weddings, workshops and church services for over 25 years, has produced 9 albums of original music and is the founder of 2 recording/touring bands,"CRYSTAL WIND" and "RHYTHM MATRIX". Bodhi specializes in providing musical soundscapes for events and workshops. His sensitivity to group energy combined with his broad range of musical and healing talents (Reiki, Breathwork, Meditation), enables him to tune in to, enhance and bring out the feeling tone present at any event, leaving people feeling inspired, uplifted & fulfilled.   Describe your flute and musical journey. Your flute background up until now. How did you get here with the flute? I was studying piano, trumpet and the accordion every week from 8 years old until I was about 14. Then I let go of the trumpet, switched over to flute and started practicing about three hours a day. I was studying jazz and classical flute in high school and then studied East Indian flute for a brief time with Sachdev at the Ali Akbar College of Music. After high school I went to Berklee College of Music for a short time in the East Coast but ended up during the 1970’s at Sonoma State studying classical flute. I played in the orchestra and studied for a short time with Paul E. Renzi, the principle flutist of the San Francisco Symphony at the time. I emulated the style of Paul Horn and got a chance to study with him for a brief period. I was also very interested in world music, listening to Japanese Shakuhachi, Pan Flute of the Andes, and the Bamboo Bansuri of East India. One Summer I studied the Indonesian Suling flute as part of a Gamelan orchestra. I explored other musical instruments, the auto harp, the harmonica, the guitar and I took voice lessons for many years. That helped the flute playing and the flute playing helped the voice training. I consider the flute like a voice and I like to play the flute like I'm singing. I was writing songs, singer-songwriter style. I experimented with different areas of music and yet I would always come back to the flute. To this day it always feels the most poignant of instruments for me.   Who inspires you as a flutist and musician?  (doesn't have to be a musician) Paul Horn. As a teenager I would listen to the “Inside The Taj Mahal” recording almost every night. It Just mesmerized me and I wanted to play like that. I'm grateful that I got to study with him later in life. I learned a few key techniques from him that really helped me develop my signature sound. Jethro Tull. Ian Anderson was another big influence, listening to him play the flute like a locomotive, expressively and energetically, was very exciting. Arthur Hills was my first college music professor and he has inspired me in countless ways over the years. Recently he helped me edit my book, “Tao Of Music”. I took a day long master class with Sir James Galway. From him I picked the power of a disciplined practice regimen. His technique is phenomenal. Also I would say being...

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Sound Healing: Sherry Finzer Interview

Posted by on Dec 1, 2016 in December 2016, Featured, Interviews | 0 comments

Sound Healing: Sherry Finzer Interview

Sherry Finzer is an international award-winning American flutist, composer, performer, and recording artist for Heart Dance Records. She is known for her variety of musical styles, and performs as a Pearl Flute and Guo Flute Performing Artist. Musically, Finzer has evolved from a classical, competitive flutist to recording acclaimed new age music albums, including Flute Flight, which won the ZMR Award for 2015 Best Relaxation/Meditation Album.  Sherry says, “I was drawn to new age music because it helps people with healing and I have learned how much people can be affected in a positive way by music.” We asked her about her career in sound healing, and she responded with the following article.   Like many of us, I started playing the flute in elementary school band. I am often asked what drew me to the flute, and the memory I have is of staying after school one day to sign up for band and try out the instruments. Being drawn to shiny objects (LOL), I found myself selecting the pretty silver flute, and also remember thinking it would be easy to carry. The size of the instrument was easy to carry for most of my career, until I started playing the low flutes and performing my own original music. Now I am lugging to shows, a whole SUV full of sound equipment, tables, CD’s and several flutes, including the C, alto, bass and sometimes the contrabass! My journey as a musician has come and go over the years. After school I decided to get married and explore other employment opportunities, and then raise two children who are now grown adults. Music came and went for me during those years. I dabbled in it with part-time teaching and performing, winning several local and national flute competitions, playing in local orchestras and bands. With a move to Arizona from Rochester, NY when my youngest was in high school, I decided to jump in full steam ahead. I looked for performance opportunities in Phoenix, and eventually wound up playing many different styles and genres of music here with multiple guitarists, pianists, and harpists. These musicians I performed with helped me along my journey by encouraging me to learn to improvise, be it jazz, world or new age music. I was also encouraged along the way to stop reading sheet music and just play by ear. That alone opened up a whole new world of opportunity for me. Not only did I feel like I was playing from the heart now, and saying what I wanted to say with my flute, it gave me the ability to get up on stage with no prior rehearsal and be able to perform with world class musicians. As far as heading into the New Age realm, I felt I needed to explore that after a woman who had purchased one of my previous classical/world CD’s had told me how that music calmed her and stopped her hands from the constant shaking that she dealt with. That is when I first realized that music could have a positive, healing effect. In our time now, the world is going at such an incredibly fast pace, that it is inherent for our health that we find ways to slow down our minds and bodies. The definition of sound healing...

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UNC Greensboro Flute Studio Interviews

Posted by on Dec 1, 2016 in December 2016, Featured, Interviews | 0 comments

UNC Greensboro Flute Studio Interviews

As part of our ongoing series of interviews with college flute studios across the United States, we interviewed Erika Boysen, Assistant Professor of Flute at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, and her students:   Sharneisha Joyner, Stephany Saunders, Noah Cline, Abby Simoneau, Mandy Mitchell, Krisztina Der, Hyunsu Yoon, Madison Libby, Janine Neprud, Holly Boucher, Emily Krestar, Elizabeth Church, Elena Gagon, Amy Karnes, and Victoria Blalock.   We asked them about their passions, goals, inspirations, and advice they would offer to young students.    Erika Boysen Assistant Professor of Flute Erika Boysen is the Assistant Professor of Flute at the University of North Carolina Greensboro.  Dr. Boysen received her DMA from the University of Michigan, MM from the New England Conservatory and BM from the University of North Carolina School of the Arts.   Please list 3 pivotal moments that were essential to creating the artist that you've become. To be honest, I don’t think singular moments shape us into the artists and people we become.  We are the product of countless experiences, interactions, decisions and challenges over the course of a lifetime.  But, if I had to choose three poignant moments from all my years, perhaps the most pivotal was meeting my first flute teacher, Kimberly Helton.  She was kind and nurturing and she thoroughly understood me and my style of learning.  Kim is a gifted teacher and without her significant and early influence I wouldn't have pursued a career in music. The summer after my eighth grade year I attended Interlochen Arts Camp for the first time. Playing in an orchestra and being surrounded by like-minded peers was new to me. My very first orchestral rehearsal was with the Intermediate Symphony Orchestra that summer and this experience had a profound impact on my life.  Our first rehearsal began with the last movement of Rimsky-Korsakov’s Cappricio Espagnol.  The conductor gave the downbeat and with the first few bars I felt electrified and a bit paralyzed.  I could barely look at my music and though the flute was up to my face, I was too overwhelmed to play.  The conductor stopped the orchestra and asked if I was lost. Indeed, I was completely lost in the captivating orchestral sound of that ensemble. It was one of the most powerful moments of my childhood. Improvisation used to terrify me.  I remember excusing myself to, “use the restroom”, “go to the doctor’s office” or “feed the cat” to avoid any requirement to improvise, vocally or instrumentally.  Shortly after arriving in Boston to begin my Masters degree, I attended a pizza party that introduced the Music in Education program at NEC.   As I approached the hall where the “meeting” was to take place I heard a lot of drumming.  “Uh oh, this sounds risky- I better turn around and go the other direction”, I thought to myself.  Fortunately, I kept walking and met Warren Senders, the man who introduced me to the world of free improvisation.  The meeting consisted of 30 minutes of drumming with plastic tubes. I’d never felt more free.  I proceeded to take his improvisation class that semester.  What I learned through improvisation I transfered to life in general.  Letting go and being okay with not knowing what notes to play or when to play them encouraged me...

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Royal Northern College of Music Flute Studio Interviews

Posted by on Dec 1, 2016 in December 2016, Featured, Interviews | 0 comments

Royal Northern College of Music Flute Studio Interviews

As part of our ongoing series of interviews with college flute studios across the United States and abroad, we interviewed Associate Tutor of Flute at the Royal Northern College of Music Noemi Gyori and her students:   Ruby Howells, Felix Blake, Imogen Royce, and Serin Jung   We asked them about their passions, goals, inspirations, and advice they would offer to young students.      Noemi Gyori Associate Tutor at the Royal Northern College of Music   Noemi Gyori is Associate Tutor at the Royal Northern College of Music and is pursuing her doctorate in performance at the Royal Academy of Music in London. She studied with Andras Adorjan, Barbara Gisler-Haase and Henrik Prohle. She is equally in demand as a soloist, chamber musician and pedagogue.   Please list 3 pivotal moments that were essential to creating the artist that you've become. The moment when I received my first flute and the incredible feeling and enjoyment I experienced playing on it right away. I knew instantly that it is going to be my life. Performing in the Vienna State Opera, alongside the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra’s musicians. Every single time I played with them, I hugely enjoyed the very special musical expression, the amazing concentration and speed of reaction each musician was playing with. Their musicianship has given me a great source of inspiration and confidence. Through launching and developing The Classical Flute and Guitar Project (www.classicalfluteandguitar.com) I have realized how much you can discover and grow as an artist, once you devote yourself and focus your attention on a specific repertoire or artistic idea.   What do you like best about performing and teaching? While playing the flute I feel that I enter a completely different world: I am able to forget about the everyday worries, dismiss my mind from things that bother me (even physical pain) and let go of any sense of time. This is the amazing and liberating psychological state that Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi identifies as Flow. It is simply magical, when you are able to share and experience this with your audience together! Ilona Kárász, my first flute teacher in Hungary has regularly made her students teach each other things they have already mastered. This means, I have been teaching youngsters from the age of 6 or 7, first explaining scales, breathing and short songs to them. Thanks to Ilona’s methods, sharing my knowledge has become a constant source of joy and eventually a vital part of my career. The most gripping for me in teaching is the kind of teamwork experienced through the lessons, which results in mutual growth of both student and professor and has a long lasting effect on the career of young professionals, helping them reaching their fullest potential and goals.   What are your goals personally?  Professionally? I guess these two interlock with each other: my goal is to continue building a beautiful family with my conductor husband, Gergely Madaras and to carry forward on my path as a performing artist, never losing the enthusiasm and devotion to what I do. I hope that with my work and lifestyle, I will once be able to contribute to the list of influential women performers, who prove that it is possible to build significant careers, while having a family as well.   What inspires you...

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PICCOLO POWER! Interviews with Professional Piccoloists

Posted by on Nov 1, 2016 in Featured, Interviews, November 2016 | 0 comments

PICCOLO POWER! Interviews with Professional Piccoloists

For our PICCOLO POWER November 2016 issue, we interview professional piccoloists from all over the world to learn why they chose the piccolo, what they like best about the instrument and the repertoire, and more about their personal and professional lives.  Keep reading to learn more about Jennifer Gunn, Kate Prestia-Schaub, Nicola Mazzanti, Zart Dombourian-Eby, Peter Verhoyen, Nan Raphael, Erica Peel, and Nicole Esposito.   Featured image: Burkart Resona Piccolo (photo via Flutistry Boston)   Jennifer Gunn Jennifer M. Gunn was appointed to the position of piccolo of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra by Daniel Barenboim in June 2005. Since joining the CSO, Jennifer has also been involved in the orchestra’s MusicNOW contemporary music series and is a coach for the Civic Orchestra. Prior to joining the CSO, she was the assistant principal flute of the Louisville Orchestra (KY) for the 2004/05 season and principal flute of the Fort Wayne Philharmonic (IN) from 2001 to 2004.   Why did you choose the piccolo? I think the piccolo really chose me.  It has not been a direct path for me, though.  While I was in undergrad, all of the flute students attended weekly orchestral excerpt classes both on flute and piccolo.  So, I got my first taste of the piccolo (post high school marching band) in this class.  I was concentrating on becoming a “flutist” but quickly learned that you had to be pretty good at both of them if you wanted to get any work.  While I was in graduate school, my flute teacher encouraged me to take piccolo lessons as an elective class.  I started to really like it!  Shortly after school started I won my first job playing second flute.  I loved it, but it was not full time so I kept taking auditions.  My next job was full time and I was playing principal flute, and while I loved the orchestra and my colleagues- I did not love playing principal flute.  So, during the summer months when the orchestra was not working I would practice my piccolo.  It was during this time that I entered the National Flute Association Piccolo Competition for the second time and won!  My next job was an Assistant Principal flute job, but since the section was only 3 people my job was to play second flute most of the time.  Again, I loved playing second flute and I loved my colleagues.  It was during the first few months of this new job that the Chicago Symphony Orchestra announced a Piccolo opening so I took the audition and made the finals!  I had a few months between the preliminary round and the finals and during that time I had a lot of encouragement and support of my new colleagues.  This was my first piccolo job and I guess the rest is history!   What do you like best about the piccolo?  I really enjoy the many roles that the piccolo gets to play.  Most of the time the piccolo is used as a additional color in the orchestra.  Sometimes the piccolo is used to continue a phrase where the first flute cannot play high enough and it is my job to carry on what my principal flute is trying to convey in the music.   And then there are of course the pure soloistic...

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Texas A&M University-Commerce Flute Studio Interviews

Posted by on Nov 1, 2016 in Featured, Interviews, November 2016 | 0 comments

Texas A&M University-Commerce Flute Studio Interviews

As part of our ongoing series of interviews with college flute studios across the United States, we interviewed  Assistant Professor of Flute at Texas A&M University-Commerce Dr. Julee Kim Walker and her students:   Andrew Camp, Emily Paxton, Amy Crone, Sydney Hathcock, Daria Smetana, and Taylor Hennig.   We asked them about their passions, goals, inspirations, and advice they would offer to young students.    Dr. Julee Kim Walker Assistant Professor of Flute, Texas A&M University-Commerce   Please list 3 pivotal moments that were essential to creating the artist that you've become. 1. In high school, I had a wonderful opportunity to attend American Festival for the Arts in Houston, TX, (which is still in existence today!) for three summers. It was an intensive summer music camp that offered lessons, chamber music, music theory, music history and orchestra for 8 weeks, with an outstanding faculty roster.  It was during my first summer there (summer after 10th grade) that I discovered I wanted to pursue a career in music. 2. Moving away from home (Texas) for my Master’s degree was one of the best decisions I ever made. Not only did I have the opportunity to study with an outstanding teacher in an amazing city (San Francisco), but it also gave me a chance to experience life outside of my comfort zone and exposed me to lots of different cultures, ways of life and ways of thinking. It is this experience that has shaped me into who I am today, and to this day I am very thankful to have had that experience. 3. My time as a doctoral teaching fellow at the University of North Texas was a pivotal moment in my musical career. I always knew growing up I wanted to pursue a career in both orchestral flute and teaching. Having the opportunity to teach talented flute, jazz, and chamber music undergraduates at UNT truly helped me realize my passion for teaching even more, and has led to where I am today.   Who were your music mentors?  and what did you learn from them? Steve Wessels (now at Cedar Park High School near Austin, TX) was my very first band director and taught me how to play the flute. Growing up in Houston, Texas, I started band in 6th grade. To this day, I am grateful for his instruction and continued dedication to music education. September Payne was one of my very first flute instructors, through middle school and high school. She taught me so much about tone production, tone color and phrasing, and exposed me to a wide variety of challenging repertoire at a young age, encouraging me to enter competitions all throughout high school. She helped me lay a solid foundation to my flute playing at an early age which I am thankful for. She also provided many opportunities for performance in both solo and chamber music settings. Christina Jennings was also one of my teachers in high school. She taught me many ways to express creativity in music by storytelling. She also taught me the art of sound. Karl Kraber was my flute professor in college. He taught me so much about the Baroque and Classical style, and taught me how to sight-read well. We sight-read Kuhlau duets at every lesson. He also taught me how...

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University of Texas at Austin Flute Studio Interviews

Posted by on Nov 1, 2016 in Featured, Interviews, November 2016 | 0 comments

University of Texas at Austin Flute Studio Interviews

As part of our ongoing series of interviews with college flute studios across the United States, we interviewed the students of University of Texas at Austin Professor of Flute Marianne Gedigian: Ryan Foley, Karen Baumgartner, Zoe Cagan, Meghen Bennett, JooYun Chung, You Hyun Cho, Tamara Drury, Cameron Massey, Courtney Regester, Chelsea Tanner, Jenna Taylor, Allison DeFrancesco, and Jessica Martinez.   We asked them about their passions, goals, inspirations, and advice they would offer to young students.    Marianne Gedigian Professor of Flute, The University of Texas at Austin Butler School of Music   Marianne Gedigian, Professor of Flute and holder of the Butler Professorship in Music at The University of Texas at Austin Butler School of Music, was a regular performer with the Boston Symphony Orchestra for over a decade, including several seasons as Acting Principal Flute under Seiji Ozawa. As Principal Flute with the Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra and Acting Principal Flute with the Boston Pops, Ms. Gedigian has been heard on dozens of recordings and Evening at Pops television broadcasts as well as the nationally broadcast Fourth of July specials. She has also been heard on several John Williams’ movie scores, including Saving Private Ryan and Schindler’s List . In the 2000 – 2001 season, Ms. Gedigian was invited by Mariss Jansons to perform as Acting Principal Flute with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. Her solo performances have taken her around the world, including recitals in Japan, Australia, England, and Armenia and she has appeared as concerto soloist numerous times with the Boston Pops Orchestra and with the Armenian Philharmonic performing her own transcription of the Khachaturian Violin Concerto. She was featured with Ian Anderson of Jethro Tull fame in a performance at the Berklee College of Music in Boston. Ms. Gedigian has been a featured soloist and teacher at numerous National Flute Association conventions across the country, and is a frequent recitalist and teacher for flute clubs in the United States, Australia, Japan, and England.   Please list 3 pivotal moments that were essential to creating the artist that you've become. Performing at Boston University while an undergraduate student. There was an older woman who attended, it seemed, every single concert. She always wore the same navy blue dress with the same pillbox hat and carried a brown paper shopping bag along with her pocketbook.  Lots of students made fun of her by calling her the bag lady. There was one concert that she came back stage and expressed her gratitude for making her days brighter and more meaningful, telling us that this particular day had been a difficult one for her and the concert brought her some relief.  We always sought her out after concerts and had extra smiles for her from onstage ever more! From that day forward I had a deeper understanding of the beautiful relationship between performer and audience and have never taken a single audience member for granted. While performing regularly with the Boston Symphony Orchestra, I volunteered to go to an underserved elementary school and demonstrate the flute.  I asked for the most ‘difficult’ class and was given the learning and behavioral challenged class. I hadn’t a clue what to do but thought to bring along crayons and paper. I started to play a little when I arrived (Faun, if my memory serves me)...

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University of Wyoming Flute Studio Interviews

Posted by on Nov 1, 2016 in Featured, Interviews, November 2016 | 0 comments

University of Wyoming Flute Studio Interviews

As part of our ongoing series of interviews with college flute studios across the United States, we interviewed Visiting Assistant Professor of Flute at University of Wyoming Dr. Nicole Riner and her students: Blair Mothersbaugh, Emily Davies, Emily Nazario, Kaycee Stevenson, Pyero Talone, Rachel Haass, Rafael Ribiero, Shantell Hillius, and Victoria Vigus.   We asked them about their passions, goals, inspirations, and advice they would offer to young students.    Dr. Nicole Riner Visiting Assistant Professor of Flute at University of Wyoming.    Please list 3 pivotal moments that were essential to creating the artist that you've become.  1. Moving for my husband’s job and having to start from scratch in a new place with no connections 2. This one happened slowly, but from my mid-20s on, I kept finding myself in the company of composers, sometimes being asked by composers to perform their works, sometimes just talking shop. I went from being a very traditionally trained classical musician with little experience playing “new” music to becoming a performer who is passionate about playing new music and advocating for emergent composers.   3. Starting college as a Russian major and realizing (within the first two weeks, I think) that I couldn’t stand to not spend every waking minute in the music building   What do you like best about performing and teaching?  Sharing information!  As a teacher, I love helping students find a better way to play and watching them grow into sophisticated, creative musicians.  As a performer, I am sharing my favorite music with audiences, and I hope that some of the music will be new to them, or at least sound like something new again, and that will spark curiosity about exploring more by that composer, etc.    What are your goals personally?  To remain calm in the face of stress, keep a healthy work/life balance, and to be compassionate towards others.    Professionally?  Continue to improve as a musician and as a teacher. Travel more!   What inspires you the most in life?  Hard work and humility.   What has been your greatest challenge?  Figuring out who I want to be.    Who were your music mentors?  and what did you learn from them?  My wonderful flute teachers: From Jan Boland I learned to be brave and creative in developing my own unique career path; Alexander Murray lead us all by fantastic example to be a good colleague and take genuine pleasure in others' successes; Richard Sherman taught me to experience constant wonder and excitement in all the details, and really pushed me to play more colorfully.   Can you give us 5 quirky, secret, fun, (don't think too much about this) hobbies or passions?  Cooking, writing, hiking, traveling, and playing and teaching the flute!   What 3 things would you offer as advice for a young flutist?  Be demanding but kind to yourself. Embrace every opportunity to learn something new. And accept others for who they are: everyone is doing the best they can.   Blair Mothersbaugh Sophomore double major in music education and performance from Casper, WY   Please list 3 pivotal moments that were essential to creating the artist that you've become. 1. In March of 2014, I was attending my freshman year at the University of Washington. Immersed in engineering studies, I...

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