Reviews

Jean-Louis Beaumadier: Album Review

Posted by on Oct 1, 2017 in CD Reviews, Featured, Issues, October 2017, Reviews | 0 comments

Jean-Louis Beaumadier: Album Review

If you wake up in a sad mood, I suggest you put on Jean-Louis Beaumadier’s new CD, Sweet Dream,a joyous album which as Jean Louis says, “demonstrates the lighter side of the piccolo’s character.” The album is part of Beaumadier’s ongoing piccolo repertoire project, and Sweet Dreams is World Piccolo, volume 3. The collection includes works by these composers from throughout the world: Camarguo Guarnieri, Mike Mower, Jean Michel Damase, Gordon Jacob, Veronique Poltz, Flint Juventino Beppe, William Bardwell, Eugene Magalif, Raymond Gulot, and Malik Mezzadri. Beaumadier is a brilliant player, who has brought piccolo playing to a new level of attention and artistry through his many recordings and commissioning of new work. He plays with a beautiful sound, perfect pitch and crystal clear rhythm, always with a joyous infectious energy!! He has some wonderful guest players on the CD including Carla Rees and Gergely Itzes on Alto flute, Magik Malik on flute/ voice, Vincent Beer Demander on Mandoline, Peter Verhoyen on piccolo, Mathier Schaefer on xylophone and Jordi Torrent on piano. They are all expert players who add to the virtuosity of the album. For example, I loved Peter Verhoyen in the humorous piccolo duet with piano by Eugene Magalif and Jordi Torrent’s incredible ensemble playing throughout the album. The final work on the album is Malik Mezzadri’s, Naomi which shows a different side to the piccolo, utilizing flute and flute singing, done expertly by Magik Malik. It’s an abstract atonal work that reminds us that the piccolo had great versatility and that Beaumadier is a master of it all!! You can purchase the album on his website. --Barbara...

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Suzanne Teng: Album Review

Posted by on Oct 1, 2017 in CD Reviews, Featured, Issues, October 2017, Reviews | 0 comments

Suzanne Teng: Album Review

Right now, we all need more meditation, healing, and peace, and Suzanne Teng/Mystic Journey's new album, "Kingdom of Mountains," provides music that evokes all of those elements.   I have always been a fan of Teng's music, as she is a master of countless world flutes, and "Kingdom of Mountains" is an excellent followup to her last album, "Mystic Journey."  Mystic Journey is now the name of the collective of musicians including Teng, her husband and co-writer, Gilbert Levy (world strings, percussions, synths), Dann M. Torres (guitar, oud, electric sitar), and Jon Ossman (bass and dilruba). "Kingdom of Mountains" is a blend of all styles of world music and flutes, and the ambient tracks behind the world instruments give it a feeling of peacefulness and thought.  This album has more rhythms, grooves, and instruments than her previous, which give the music more textures and layers.  Standout tracks are "Kingdom of Mountains," a 7 minute track, as I like the longer length in tracks, especially in meditation music.  "Delicate Rainbow Flower" is pure beauty, and the instruments blend together harmoniously.  When I close my eyes and listen to "Yunnan," I get transported to China.  Much of Teng's music can take you to different worlds if you just clear your thoughts and listen.  ...

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Carlos Escribá Cano: Album Review

Posted by on Sep 1, 2017 in CD Reviews, Featured, Issues, Reviews, September 2017 | 0 comments

Carlos Escribá Cano: Album Review

Flutist, composer, arranger, and music producer, Carlos Cano Escribá plays with a grenadilla wooden flute from Verne Q. Powell Flutes.  Born in Havana in 1971, he completed his studies at the National School of Music. Mr. Escribá is a former member of the National Symphony Orchestra of Cuba, with which he performed on the most important stages of Spain.  He continuously collaborates with orchestras such as the Symphony Orchestra of Madrid and the Symphonic Orchestra of the Gran Teatro del Liceo in Barcelona. His last work, Canciones y Palabras, along with pianist Hernán Milla and Cuban poet Aldo J. Méndez, was nominated for a Latin Grammy as best album for children.  Escribá is currently flute professor at the Marcos Redondo Professional Music Conservatory in Ciudad Real, Spain. Por La Rivera de Paquito, the new album from flutist Carlos Escribá Cano and pianist Hernán Milla, is a delightful collection of Paquito De Rivera's iconic Cuban music, which is thoughtfully arranged by Cano and Milla for flute, piano, and a variety of accompanying instruments.  When you think of De Rivera's sound, flute does not generally come to mind, as his music was primarily played and written for clarinet and saxophone.  Cano's interpretation and playing was authentic, honest, and virtuosic, showcasing his talents as a flutist, orchestrator, and arranger.  The legendary De Rivera is featured on the opening and closing tracks of the album, adding an even extra layer of counterpoint and harmony. The album begins with Con Chucho Corriente Abajo (Variations on Chucho Valdes' Mambo Influenciado).  This piece is a fun mambo and fugue; parts of it are reminiscent of Claude Bolling's Suite for Flute and Jazz Piano, altering between jazzy and classical.  Next is Aires Tropicales, in four short movements (Contradanza, Habanera, Vals Venezolano, Afro).  This relatively unknown wind quintet by Rivera, arranged for flute and piano, was played with a freshness and crispness, accentuating the solid collaboration between Cano and Milla. Cano brings out the alto flute in the Dizzy Gillespie standard, A Night in Tunisia, and adds doublebass and percussion to another excellent arrangement.  His alto flute tone is rich and smooth, and his solos soar with virtuosity through the piece.  As Cano is mostly a classical and orchestral player, I was quite impressed to hear his jazz chops which rival those of most jazz flutists.  De Rivera's The Cape Cod Files, originally for clarinet and piano, start with the first movement (Lecuonerías) as a long cadenza of solo flute, the second (Benny @100) adding piano, third (Bandoneón) adding the bandoneón accordian as a tribute to Astor Piazzola with a lovely improvised bandoneón part from Claudio Constantini, and ending with Chiquita Blues, which is a jaunty and rhythmic finale to the piece.  The last 3 short pieces on the album (La Fleur de Cayenne, Invitacion al Danzon, Brussels in the Rain) round out this exciting album of music that is rarely played and heard by flutists, and Carlos Cano Escribá/Hernán Milla bring their outstanding teamwork and knowledge of De Rivera's music and style into every piece.  Brussels in the Rain created a whimsical Parisian atmopshere and was a stand out track on the album.   Por La Rivera de Paquito, which means "for the river of Paquito," is an album that flows like a river from song to song.  ...

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Galway Flute Festival: The Guest Artists

Posted by on Aug 1, 2017 in August 2017, Concert Reviews, Featured, Issues, Reviews | 0 comments

Galway Flute Festival: The Guest Artists

  The Guest Artists of the Galway Flute Festival gave incredible masterclasses and concerts and came from all over the world. We asked them about their experiences at the festival, their flute stories, and advice they would offer to young students.      Kersten McCall Artist in Residence Philipp Jundt Switzerland/Korea Nicola Mazzanti Italy Irina Stachinskaya Russia Juliette Hurel France Stephen Clark Scotland Barbara Kortmann Germany Ernesto Fernandez USA Andrea Griminelli Italy and of course, Sir James Galway Thank you for everything!   THANK YOU from The Flute View...

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Bill McBirnie: Album Review

Posted by on Jul 1, 2017 in CD Reviews, Featured, Issues, July 2017, Reviews | 0 comments

Bill McBirnie: Album Review

Bill McBirnie & Bruce Jones, Grains of Sand Bill McBirnie’s new collaboration album with Bruce Jones is a wonderful melding of creativity! Jones, the composer on these tracks plays guitar, percussion and synths as well as the vocals and McBirnie is on flute, alto flute and piccolo as well as co-composing on tracks 3,5,9 and 11. The music is diverse as Jones, though brought up in Brazil, combines many other influences into his output including, rock, hip hop and new age, as well as improvisation. Bill describes their way of working together like this: “A project of this nature—involving just the two of us—takes considerable time to complete and so it inevitably proceeds in stages. Each track starts with Bruce writing, playing and recording whatever idea he has in mind. After Bruce has laid down what is a fairly complete track, we then overlay any flute melodies he has in mind. In addition, we conjure up shots and harmony parts and overdub these. After that, we go back and I improvise over the entire track. Finally, we take whatever we have (…which is typically too much…) edit it and mix it down. Of course, we “subtract” far more than we “add” as the process unfolds until sooner or later (…usually later…) we find what we’re after.” I love this description of perfect collaboration and it shows in the album. The melodies and tunes are excellent and the flute(s) improv’s are original, brilliant and exciting. The layering of the alto, flute and piccolo are seamless and the Bruce’s vocals add the perfect addition contrast. Bill is a virtuoso player, with a beautiful expressive sound and masterful fingers! When I listen to this album I feel very happy!!! www.extremeflute.com extremeflute@look.ca -Barbara Siesel...

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Rozalind MacPhail: Album Review

Posted by on Jul 1, 2017 in CD Reviews, Featured, Issues, July 2017, Reviews | 0 comments

Rozalind MacPhail: Album Review

Rozalind MacPhail grew up in Canada on a small group of islands nestled in the harbour of Toronto, Ontario called Toronto Island. She has lived in many parts of Canada but it was the artistically vibrant city of St. John’s, Newfoundland that stole her heart. Following years of classical music performance training at the Etobicoke School of the Arts,  University of Toronto and University of Ottawa, she has pursued her interest in a wide range of musical genres, while performing as guest flutist with other artists, including Yo La Tengo, Lou Barlow, Constantines, Great Lake Swimmers, Elliott Brood and Pick a Piper. Rozalind MacPhail recently won MusicNL's Female Artist of the Year and an East Coast Music Award for Electronic Recording of the Year.   “It can be so unsettling when we are forced to let go of loved ones, get rid of bad habits, deal with painful memories or change unhealthy life patterns. We hope this music will help you cope with life’s unexpected moments. May it ease you into the present moment, help you feel grounded and capable of facing any challenge that comes your way." Rozalind MacPhail Rozalind continues, "The parts were actually recorded to the sunrise each day for the entire month of February and I kept my first take of all the flute parts. It was inspired by the death of famous Newfoundland stained glass artist, Graham Howcroft who was my friend and roommate.  Kim Henninger and Shawn Parke of Portland, Oregon (film composers of EMBERS and LUCKY) created the electronics so it was a collaborative effort.  Stephen Vardy is a yoga and meditation instructor at Moksha Yoga in St. John's."   "Sunset Sunrise" music is for connecting to our higher selves, for rising above daily concerns, to open into the space of Love. The CD opens with sustained electronic sounds and a guided meditation by Stephen Vardy. The second track begins with sustained electronic sounds which provide a nice foundation for the soaring and sparing flute lines. When the bansuri flute finally enters, it is as if one can actually see the sun rising. This is a long, 25 minute track, perfect for a morning meditation. The third track entitled, Sunset, features another bed of electronic sounds and light tabla sounds actually captured on the flute! and overtone sounds for 25 minutes making this the consummate meditation CD, one track perfectly tailored for the morning and the other one for the evening. The album liner notes suggest the following:   Get yourself comfortable and take a moment to relax, rejuvenate and release your day! We hope this music will help you cope with life’s unexpected moments. May it ease you into the present moment, help you feel grounded and capable of facing any challenge that comes your way.   MacPhail says, “There is a great need in our world right now to find ways of tapping into our inner peace while being in the midst of so much uncertainty.” Rozalind MacPhail certainly has created a beautifully serene way to invoke meditation. Perfect for daily meditations, this digital album, "Sunset Sunrise",  is a perfect companion to any meditation routine.  Rozalind MacPhail is a fountain of creativity, a plethora of surprises and colors. -Viviana Guzman Listen to Rozalind MacPhail's Bandcamp link...

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Righteous Girls: Concert Review

Posted by on Jun 1, 2017 in Concert Reviews, Featured, Issues, June 2017, Reviews | 0 comments

Righteous Girls: Concert Review

Righteous Girls, a duo of Gina Izzo (flute) and Erika Dohi (piano), is not your typical flute and piano duo.  I wasn't really sure what to expect when attending their Lincoln Center debut sponsored by Chamber Music New York, but I was impressed and entranced throughout their entire program of music composed after the year 2000. What was unique about Righteous Girls was their use of live electronics and looping, adding many more layers to the traditional flute and piano ensemble, giving a full spectrum of sound that one does not usually hear.  All the music was very contemporary but nothing too atonal and all sonically pleasing, much of it with minimalist influences.  The repertoire was unique and fresh, unknown (yet) to the flute community, but I see their music having its place there soon.  It was quite refreshing for me to hear a program of flute and piano pieces I have never heard before.  Their program was virtually seamless, with each piece flowing into the next. Righteous Girls also composes some of their music, using reverb, delay, and some live processed effects.  My favorite piece, and the standout of the evening, was their arrangement of Andy Ahiko's 21 (originally for cello and steel pan drum).  I was amazed by the various looping, pedals, and even addition of a bass drum.  The piece was lively, rhythmic, visually interesting, and I kept wanting to hear more! On Andy Akiho’s 21, I was using three different foot pedals to navigate my way through the piece. The first one was a pedal for my iPad page turn, as there are not many (if any) points throughout the piece where I can focus on removing my hands from the flute to turn the page. Ideally in the future, this will be memorized to have one less ‘thing’ to focus on! The second pedal is a loop pedal. The piece opens with two lines that we then loop throughout the entire work; plucking of piano strings as well as mallets hitting inside the piano on its beams. Throughout the piece I am faced with the task of triggering these two loops on cue. The third pedal arranged into the flute part was a kick drum (Erika was managing the tambourine kick). At many points throughout the piece, I would be playing both the notated flute part, kick drum, loop pedal, and page turn at the same time! Kinda like driving a car...Gina Izzo Righteous Girls has a very bright future ahead of them, and I look forward to hearing more of their music and music they commission.  Righteous Girls is the future of the flute and piano duo.   -Fluterscooter...

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Noemi Gyori: Album Review

Posted by on Jun 1, 2017 in CD Reviews, Featured, Issues, June 2017, Reviews | 0 comments

Noemi Gyori: Album Review

Glowing Sonorities, the recent album released by flutist Noemi Gyori and pianist Katalin Csillagh, is a feast of Romantic music. This collection was crafted with obvious care and intention. The pieces themselves as well as the order in which they are presented was well thought-out to provide the maximum musical effect to the listener. In Gyori’s capable hands, these works shine, despite the fact that the Schubert and the Franck pieces were not originally written for flute. They seem entirely idiomatic to the flute thanks to fine editions and the performer’s excellent interpretations. The deliberate selection of the “oldest Steinway model available” according to the liner notes also adds to the rich timbre of the ensemble. The liner notes to the album are fascinating and truly well done. Gyori gives context for the flute during the Romantic era and also outlines some of the challenges in performing transcriptions of works originally composed for string instruments. The CD takes us on a tour of the Romantic era; the Schubert begins the collection with a representation of the elegance of the Romantic era, the Reinecke is “a true jewel of the original repertoire for flute and piano duo,” and the Franck exhibits the musical qualities of the late Romantic era. Overall, this is an excellent, high-quality album featuring beautiful playing and clear phrasing. Gyori and Csillagh are successful at keeping the drama of the Romantic era at the center of their interpretations of these three delightful works. To learn more about Noémi Gyori, visit her website at www.noemigyori.com. Glowing Sonorities Hungaroton HCD 32767 Noémi Gyori, flute Katalin Csillagh, piano Sonata for Arpeggione and Piano in A Minor, D. 821 – Franz Schubert Allegro moderato Adagio Allegretto Sonata for Flute and Piano in E Minor, Op. 167 “Undine” – Carl Reinecke Allegro Allegretto vivace Andante tranquillo Allegro molto agitato ed appassionato, quasi Presto Sonata for Violin and Piano in A Major – César Franck Allegretto ben moderato Allegro Recitativo-Fantasia. Ben moderato Allegretto poco mosso   -Tammy Evans...

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Black Cedar: Album Review

Posted by on May 1, 2017 in CD Reviews, Featured, Issues, May 2017, Reviews | 0 comments

Black Cedar: Album Review

Black Cedar, which comprises flute, guitar, and cello, offers a variety of attractive chamber works for this particular instrumentation. Bookended by works commissioned by the trio, the four pieces presented each offer something different. Miscellaneous Music by Durwynne Hsieh (b. 1963) offers some truly beautiful, soaring melodies, especially in the first movement. Nathan Kolosko’s Hungarian Trio features traditional Hungarian melodies and traditional Hungarian dance steps. These modern instruments mimic their Hungarian counterparts. The flute in particular is supposed to mirror the Hungarian shepherd’s flute, which is similar to a renaissance recorder, being end-blown with a fipple mouthpiece. Debussyana, which is a movement from a larger work by Klaus Hinrich Stahmer, was inspired by a poem cycle by Gerhard Vescovi. Audible are samples from Debussy’s L’après-midi d’un faune. Finally, Garrett Shatzer’s Of Emblems closes out the album with quiet introspection. The third movement in particular opens with a moody flute solo, which is quickly joined by guitar. Their entwined duet is eventually joined by cello to complete the trio. Overall, I find the overall timbral combinations to be quite pleasant. The flute sound really blends with the warmth of the guitar and cello. Occasionally the flute color rises above the ensemble as it approaches the upper reaches of its range. While there is limited repertoire for this combination of instruments, it is a repertoire worth developing. Learn more about Black Cedar at www.blackcedar.biz. A Path Less Trod That Other Label Black Cedar Kris Palmer, flute Steven Lin, guitar Nancy Kim, cello Miscellaneous Music (2015) – Durwynne Hsieh (b. 1963) I. Möbius Movement II. Introverted Interlude III. Five Fun Facts Hungarian Trio (2012) – Nathan Kolosko (b. 1975) I. Prelude II. Round Dance III. Ancient Melody IV. Spinning Dance Acht Nachtstücke (1983) – Klaus Hinrich Stahmer (b. 1941) Debussyana Of Emblems (2014) – Garrett Ian Shatzer (b. 1980) I. Andante II. Lento III....

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Sarah Frisof: Album Review

Posted by on Apr 1, 2017 in April 2017, CD Reviews, Featured, Issues, Reviews | 0 comments

Sarah Frisof: Album Review

Sarah Frisof:  “Looking Back, the Flute Music of Joseph Schwantner” Joseph Schwantner has a long history of writing beautiful music for flute, and in her new CD, Sarah Frisof shares several of his works with us. The album includes: “Soaring” (1986), “Looking Back” (written in honor of Samuel Baron) “Black Anemones” (1980) and the first recording of “Taking Charge” written for Walfrid Kujala (2012). Sarah plays Schwanter’s music with technical mastery, excitement and verve. Her pitch is excellent as she navigates the very expressive and difficult challenges with amazing ease! The new work “Taking Charge” is scored for flute/piccolo, percussion and piano. Her expert pianist is the composer/pianist Daniel Pesca and she’s joined by Ji Hye Jung and Lee Vinson on percussion. They are all outstanding musicians and together play this new piece rhythmically and musically, creating the perfect ensemble and atmosphere. I especially love Movement 2, “a voice from afar” a 12 minute long movement with evocative and deeply felt piccolo, playing against non-pitched percussion of cymbals, triangle, steel bowls, gong and tam tam. The hushed quiet movement is in perfect contrast to the other more percussive, driving, jazzy surrounding movements. Schwantner is a wonderful and skilled composer, and if you want to learn more about his flute music, you can’t find a better introduction than this album! Recorded by Centaur in 2014 at the Lied Center, Lawrence, Kansas. Engineer, Colin Mahoney....

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