Concert Reviews

Righteous Girls: Concert Review

Posted by on Jun 1, 2017 in Concert Reviews, Featured, Issues, June 2017, Reviews | 0 comments

Righteous Girls: Concert Review

Righteous Girls, a duo of Gina Izzo (flute) and Erika Dohi (piano), is not your typical flute and piano duo.  I wasn't really sure what to expect when attending their Lincoln Center debut sponsored by Chamber Music New York, but I was impressed and entranced throughout their entire program of music composed after the year 2000. What was unique about Righteous Girls was their use of live electronics and looping, adding many more layers to the traditional flute and piano ensemble, giving a full spectrum of sound that one does not usually hear.  All the music was very contemporary but nothing too atonal and all sonically pleasing, much of it with minimalist influences.  The repertoire was unique and fresh, unknown (yet) to the flute community, but I see their music having its place there soon.  It was quite refreshing for me to hear a program of flute and piano pieces I have never heard before.  Their program was virtually seamless, with each piece flowing into the next. Righteous Girls also composes some of their music, using reverb, delay, and some live processed effects.  My favorite piece, and the standout of the evening, was their arrangement of Andy Ahiko's 21 (originally for cello and steel pan drum).  I was amazed by the various looping, pedals, and even addition of a bass drum.  The piece was lively, rhythmic, visually interesting, and I kept wanting to hear more! On Andy Akiho’s 21, I was using three different foot pedals to navigate my way through the piece. The first one was a pedal for my iPad page turn, as there are not many (if any) points throughout the piece where I can focus on removing my hands from the flute to turn the page. Ideally in the future, this will be memorized to have one less ‘thing’ to focus on! The second pedal is a loop pedal. The piece opens with two lines that we then loop throughout the entire work; plucking of piano strings as well as mallets hitting inside the piano on its beams. Throughout the piece I am faced with the task of triggering these two loops on cue. The third pedal arranged into the flute part was a kick drum (Erika was managing the tambourine kick). At many points throughout the piece, I would be playing both the notated flute part, kick drum, loop pedal, and page turn at the same time! Kinda like driving a car...Gina Izzo Righteous Girls has a very bright future ahead of them, and I look forward to hearing more of their music and music they commission.  Righteous Girls is the future of the flute and piano duo.   -Fluterscooter...

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PROJECT Trio and LA Chamber Orchestra Concert Review

Posted by on Dec 1, 2016 in Concert Reviews, December 2016, Featured | 0 comments

PROJECT Trio and LA Chamber Orchestra Concert Review

PROJECT Trio members Greg Pattillo, Eric Stephenson and Peter Seymour met at the Cleveland Institute of Music, where they received the 2013 CIM Alumni Achievement Award. Forged with a desire to draw new and diverse audiences through high energy, top quality music, the Trio got its big break in 2006 when Pattillo’s Beatboxing Flute video went viral, receiving millions of views in its first week. Now based in Brooklyn, PROJECT Trio has its own YouTube channel with over 80 million views and 100,000 subscribers, making them one of the most watched instrumental ensembles on the internet.   I've only heard PROJECT Trio as a flute/cello/bass trio, but to hear them with orchestra for the first time was on a different level. They gave the West Coast premiere of Adam Schoenberg's (b. 1980) Scatter for trio and orchestra on November 12-13, 2016 with the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra. Scatter was written specifically for the trio, and the piece showcased the trio both collectively and individually. The piece is written as one movement and broken down into 3 distinct sections with electronic backing. The electronics were subtle and fit nicely into the piece.     The unique and fun energy of PROJECT Trio shined throughout the piece, from the jaunty rhythms to the lyrical phrasing. I especially enjoyed hearing Greg Pattillo play more lyrical lines; since we are mostly used to his beatboxing, we often don't hear his more "classical" tone and technique, and he performs at the level or better than any of today's flute soloists! The cohesiveness and playfulness of PROJECT Trio is something that can't be imitated. With cellist Eric Stephenson and bassist Peter Seymour, the group's energy is at always 1000%, and with orchestra, their energy was amplified even more. The LA Chamber Orchestra played the piece very well, too!" --Fluterscooter...

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French Flute Convention Review by Fluterscooter

Posted by on Nov 1, 2016 in Concert Reviews, Featured, November 2016 | 0 comments

French Flute Convention Review by Fluterscooter

The French Flute Convention happens only once every four years, so when it happens, it is quite a show.  I don’t usually do European shows, but French bakeries!   This year’s convention, themed “Flute Spirit,” featured flute legends Maxence Larrieu, Patrick Gallois, Pierre Yves-Artaud, and Philippe Bernold, as well as many of today’s leading flutists such as Jasmine Choi and Julien Beaudiment.    Did I mention I met Yubeen Kim?     As an exhibitor, it is always difficult to get to concerts, and this convention was no different.  The exhibit hall was bustling all 4 days, and I was very pleased with all the Fluterscooter bag booth traffic, especially the great feedback for the new “French Bag” that I designed for Julien Beaudiment.  For me, it is always interesting to see what flutists in different countries like to wear.  I was fortunate enough to catch the closing concert, which featured a full sized flute orchestra from Japan, conducted by Philippe Bernold. Has anyone ever seen the Japanese flute orchestras?  #flutefashion to the extreme!  They wore an array of pastel evening gowns and sparkly jewelry that made them shine on stage. I wish every flute orchestra could be that aesthetically pleasing.     They performed the European premiere of Yuko Uebayashi’s Les trois bouquets pour l’orchestre de flutes, which was a lovely three movement piece with nods to Ravel’s Daphnis et Chloe. Then, fittingly, performed an arrangement of Daphnis, with the solo played exquisitely by Ikuko Sunamori.  Lastly, Maxence Larrieu was the soloist for Mozart’s G Major Flute Concerto. This is particularly interesting, because I wasn’t sure how the full orchestra score could be realized by only flutes, but they pulled it off effortlessly. I was quite impressed with the power and intonation of the low flutes.  It is always a treat to hear a legend like Msr. Larrieu, and Philippe Bernold commanded the podium with grace.  I look forward to the next convention in 4...

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NFA Highlights by Viviana Guzman

Posted by on Sep 1, 2016 in Articles, Concert Reviews, Featured, September 2016 | 0 comments

NFA Highlights by Viviana Guzman

NFA Overview Usually all of us at The Flute View Magazine write a little summary of the various concerts we attend at the National Flute Association Convention.  This year, Fluterscooter and I were the only ones able to go to NFA in San Diego, and since she was kept busy in her Fluterscooter booth, I was the only one who was able to listen to some concerts. Please keep in mind that this is only a very small sampling of what was available in the program book. I was working as the NFA Public Relations Chair, so I had certain duties to fulfill and I had to go in and out of various performances, so I was unable to attend complete performances.     Following are some highlight performances: Thursday Afternoon Concert A Thursday afternoon delight was listening to ZAWA’s splendid concert with Jill Felber, Claudia Anderson and Dianne Frazer followed by Amy Porter’s spectacular performance of the Prokofiev Sonata with pianist Katie Leung…. exquisitely executed…. MEMORIZED!  Listen to a clip from The Flute View Instagram feed here.  What a terrific way to start off the convention. Friday Afternoon Tribute to Katherine Hoover  Denis Bouriakov’s performance of “Spirit Flight” by Katherine Hoover was sublime, delicate and profound, appropriately reflecting the piece’s title. Zara Lawler spun her unique saga on “Serenade from Canyon Echoes” by Katherine Hoover with Dustin Donahue (vibraphone and marimba) and Barbie Diewald (choreographer).  Bringing movement into her selection, Lawler’s interpretation of Hoover’s work was creative, original and innovative, transporting the work into new interpretive heights.  Lawler was a delight to witness. Another thrilling collaboration, was “The Word in Flower” by Katherine Hoover performed by Bonita Boyd,  (flute), Anna Belaya, (soprano), Daniel Nistico (guitar).  Listening to the contrasting sonorities of each movement was like tasting the varying courses within a meal.  Boyd’s thoughtful luminosity rang together gracefully with Belaya’s robust and resonant voice while Nistico’s guitar provided a resonant bed for the ethereal singing lines.     “Dream Dances” for piano solo by Katherine Hoover performed by Dianne Frazer was the perfect palette cleanser of the recital, brilliantly executed with Frazer’s technical prowess and solitary flair. Another visionary favorite was “Kokopelli” by Katherine Hoover as performed by Laurel Zucker.  Choosing to perform the work, from the audience rather than from the stage, Zucker brought a haunting sheen to this popular work.  Technically brilliant and with a ravishing sound, Zucker placed her bewitching stamp on this alluring and favored solo work for flute. Finishing off this remarkable concert, was Denis Bouriakov and Dianne Frazer performing “Mountain and Mesa” by Katherine Hoover.  Spinning their enchanting collaboration, Bouriakov and Frazer performed a spellbinding rendition of this most entrancing and lesser known gem. Listen to short performance clips that I posted from the NFA Instagram feed here.     Friday Night GALA The Friday Night Gala commenced with Handel’s Sonata in E Minor, Fantasy on Benyovzky by Pfeiffer and Romanian Folk Dances by Bartok as performed by the brilliant Hungarian flutist, Gergely Ittzes (flute) and the always excellent Margaret McDonald (piano) The Chaconne by Bach and Fantaisie-Impromptu by Chopin are very known works of the violin and piano world respectively.  Denis Bouriakov (flute) and Margaret McDonald (piano) performed these works with dazzling, majestic and breathtaking ease.  Bouriakov’s arrangements of these jewels, are sure to...

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Green Golly with the Firelands Symphony by Rachel Hacker

Posted by on Jul 1, 2016 in Concert Reviews, Featured, July 2016 | 0 comments

Green Golly with the Firelands Symphony by Rachel Hacker

On a bright morning in June, I set out to Sandusky, Ohio to to take part in the Fireland Symphony's presentation of my fellow Flute View staffer's performance of Green Golly & Her Golden Flute (I was delighted to play flute in the choir). Little did I know that I would witness a rare gem in the mine of “Flutrepreneurship.” Barbara Siesel and her husband Keith Torgan, are the creators of this exciting blend of literature, drama, and music written to create new audiences for classical music. “Green Golly and Her Golden Flute” is the story of a girl in a tower with very long hair and a flute. Donning whimsically designed costumes (a perfect match for their stage personas) Barbara flutes her way to glory as Green Golly while Keith becomes all the other characters. The performance lasts roughly 45 minutes, and audiences of all ages are entertained by the couple’s stage antics.   The curtain goes up on the storyteller singing a whimsical, original song, which informs us that Rapunzel was not the only long haired girl in a tower -- there were many, many others: "Ethel was put in a tower by mommy And Missy Matilda by weird Uncle Tommy Big Beverly climbed up there all by himself And poor little Lila -- was trapped by an elf" Keith is the composer and lyricist of all the original music in Green Golly. His lyrics incite laughter from even the most difficult of children. One of my favorite lines by Keith in the opening song is: “His eyes were the color of boogers.” Sprinkled throughout the plot are excerpts from some of the most recognized works in the classical music canon. Barbara’s graceful tone and crisp articulation soars across audiences. Just like a recipe for brownies that includes black beans, or macaroni and cheese with pureed squash, the Green Golly Project is able to incorporate “ mental nutrition” into the fun story line. Kids are given an unfair reputation for not appreciating classical music, but audiences are captivated by Barbara’s command of the stage through her flute playing. Works such as Francis Borne’s Carmen Fantasy, or Chopin’s Minute Waltz, are sure to grab the attention of even the most distracted of children.   Any young “Flutrepreneur” should take note of how Green Golly has evolved into a business venture. “Green Golly” is far more than just a live performance, it's a brand. Through the hard work and imagination of its creators the story has become an award winning CD, a book, a flute and a curriculum. Green Golly & Her Golden Flute appeals to a wide range of venues, including libraries, schools, performing arts centers and orchestral outreach programs. These venues are large enough to supply funds necessary for each performance. The Firelands Symphony, located in the Sandusky, OH, area, has been able to fund The Green Golly project for several performances in the northern Ohio area. I became acquainted with Jody Chaffee, the Director of Educational Outreach in Sandusky. Below is Jody’s statement, involving the story of how Green Golly came to Sandusky: As the education outreach director for the Firelands Symphony Orchestra, I had the wonderful opportunity to bring the Green Golly Project to 9 elementary schools in the Sandusky area of Ohio. We first...

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Rachel Hacker: Concert Review

Posted by on Feb 1, 2016 in Concert Reviews, Featured, February 2016, Issues, Reviews | 0 comments

Rachel Hacker: Concert Review

I like to attend student recitals when I can, because they are often showcases of the freshest and creative playing I have heard.  Rachel Hacker's NYU Graduate Recital was no exception.  After a day of flying back East for the holidays and shipping Fluterscooter bags at the Chinatown post office before the Christmas deadline, dragging luggage and running to Spectrum on NYC's Lower East Side in the cold weather was a little crazy, but once I settled into the popular new music venue, I was ready for a great evening of contemporary flute music. Rachel Hacker is a student of Robert Dick and a champion of his coveted Glissando head joint.  I was very curious to hear the head joint in concert, as I've only heard Robert play it himself.   The first piece on the program was "Density 666," which "gives a hearty nod to Edgard Varese's 1936 composition Density 21.5."  The piece contained both elements of Varese and improvisation, done with an electronic backing track created with KYMA interactive music software.  I'm a sucker for interactive electronic backing tracks, and the haunting quality of the track complimented the flute glissandos very nicely. Next on the program was Berio's Sequenza 1, and Ms. Hacker's extended techniques were always on point.  Isang Yun's Garak was a new piece to me, and the flute and piano chamber work is inspired by traditional Korean music.  The tone colors used imitated the Korean "Daegeum" flute, which has a quite reedy sound.  The technical element and collaboration in this piece was challenging, and Ms. Hacker made both sound effortless and seamless. Fukushima's Mei was next, also played on the Glissando head joint, which well-suited all the pitch bends written in the piece.  The pitch bends are traditionally done with head motions, but adding the Glissando head joint gave the glissandi much greater affect.  Lastly, flutist Ammon Swinbank joined for Robert Dick's flute duet, Time is a Two-Way Street.  This piece was probably my favorite, since I love Robert Dick's music, and the way he writes for two flutes and multi phonics is even better than his solo music, since there are twice as many options! I'm looking forward following Rachel Hacker's career, and you can find out more about her next month, when she is the featured Cover Girl and 4th member finalist for The Flute...

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My Evenings with Claire Chase at The Kitchen, a Show Review. By Rachel Hacker

Posted by on Nov 2, 2015 in Concert Reviews, Featured, Issues, November 2015, Reviews | 0 comments

My Evenings with Claire Chase at The Kitchen, a Show Review. By Rachel Hacker

Although I spend most of my day playing extended techniques, I also enjoy listening to others play extended techniques. One of the most prolific and recent endeavors within the new music world comes from Claire Chase, and is called Density 2036. I am fortunate enough to say that I could witness part of this event, at a venue called The Kitchen, in New York City. Below is an excerpt from her website, and explains the project: “Density 2036 is a 22-year project begun by Claire Chase in 2014 to commission an entirely new body of repertory for solo flute each year until the 100th Anniversary of Edgard Varèse’s groundbreaking 1936 flute solo, Density 21.5. Each season between 2014-2036, Claire will premiere a new 60-minute program of solo flute works commissioned that year in a special performance at The Kitchen in New York City, and on tour in select cities thereafter. Additionally, each cycle of works (Density 2014, Density 2015, Density 2020, etc) will be released in their world premiere recordings annually, and scores, performance notes and materials be made available digitally as educational resources for flutists everywhere. Every three years of the cycle (Density 2016, Density 2019, etc) a retrospective event will be held in which Claire will perform cumulative concerts of all Density work commissioned up until that date. In 2036, a 24-hour marathon will take place.” I had finally met Claire in March of 2015, at the annual New York Flute Club Fair. She was the featured guest artist, and performed an exciting collection of repertoire, varying from Density 21.5, to a technology-heavy composition titled “Luciform.” Me, being the nerd I am, shamelessly introduced myself to her after the concert. I opened up the Instagram app on my iPhone, awkwardly snapped our selfie together, and mumbled some phrases about “new music,” “I go to NYU,” and “I love your work.” Claire is a pleasant, humble, and approachable individual, who takes the time to appreciate her guests. Later that year, Claire would do a three concert series, on September 29, 30, and October 2.    On the 29th, she performed a similar set of pieces that I heard with the New York Flute Club. However, I could not attend, because I had a night class at NYU. On Wednesday and Friday, however, I was able to experience the magic of Density 2036. Wednesday and Friday were full house performances. As has been discussed in music circles for the past few decades, some worry that “classical music is dying.” However, performers such as Claire are able to reignite flame of “Classical Music.” New York City has a particularly fertile environment for music ingenuity, even in 2015. For many decades, grandiose musical performances have been carried out. Events such as the epically long 5 hour long Philip Glass opera “Einstein on the Beach” have been met with great success. Chase’s ambitions have been met with similar fervor from audiences. Aside from making music, Claire Chase is able to create a substantial multisensory performance. Involving music technology is a great way to engage audiences in a new music recital. As someone with a background in lighting design and production work, I found the detailed production work to be extremely complimentary to her musical message. When done well, will intensify a composition’s emotional...

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Joshua Smith: Concert Review. By Fluterscooter

Posted by on Mar 1, 2015 in Concert Reviews, Featured, Issues, March 2015, Reviews | 0 comments

Joshua Smith: Concert Review.  By Fluterscooter

The Philadelphia Chamber Music Society presented principal flutist of the Cleveland Orchestra, Joshua Smith, along with pianist Christina Dahl at Philadelphia's historic Benjamin Franklin Hall on February 8th. The program included Schubert's Sonatina in A Minor (originally for violin), Bartok's Suite Paysanne Hongroise, CPE Bach's Sonata in A minor, Kurtag's Signs, Games, and Messages, and Boulez's Sonatine. Mr. Smith played on a Powell wooden flute for the entire concert, which was quite impressive considering the technical challenges of the Boulez. The Schubert Sonatina was a beautiful way to start this concert, and it was my first time hearing the piece. Smith's dynamic range was something you rarely hear these days; his contrasts from so soft to so loud were seamless, and I could almost hear 20 different dynamics throughout the piece. His affect and tone colors were very special and made for a stylistically perfect interpretation of Schubert's piece. Next, pianist Christina Dahl provided some fun and contemporary "filler" music from Thomas Ades and William Bolcom, Mazurka No. 2 (2009) and Graceful Ghost Rag (1983). She played both pieces together without a pause, foreshadowing what was to come with the CPE Bach and Kurtag. *sidenote: Smith and Dahl both played from iPads/Airturns the entire concert, which made me slightly nervous. As technologically forward as I am, I am really old-school when it comes to reading music and books. At least if music falls on the floor, I can pick it up in a second. If an iPad crashes, it would be a much more awkward pause. Plus, I like the feel of paper...but that is a whole other post entirely. Bartok's Suite Paysanne Hongroise is one of my favorite pieces to play, and I was very happy when I saw it on the program. Again, I thoroughly enjoyed all of Smith's tone colors; he could go from a whisper to a huge, full sound. Combined with his playfulness and technical fluidity throughout Bartok's collection of short folk songs, he gave a delightful performance of this treasured piece. The second half of the program seemed much more technically and physically challenging, starting with 2 solo flute pieces and ending with the beastly Boulez Sonatine. Instead of playing the CPE Bach and then the Kurtag, Smith did something non-conventional and did a "mash-up" of sorts, interspersing both pieces together. For example, he started with Kurtag's Homage a JS Bach, followed by the CPE Bach Adagio, and then Kurtag's Doloroso. The Kurtag pieces were written from 1987-2005 and include many extended techniques, so it was quite a contrast to CPE Bach's Sonata (1747). The interspersing of these 2 pieces gave a unique mix of beauty from the Bach and darkness from the Kurtag. Lastly, the Boulez Sonatine: I have a love/hate relationship with this piece; I love listening it and hate playing it! I bought it in high school only because it was the most difficult ranked piece in the Flute World catalog. After I looked at it, I realized the piece was just not for me, so I am always impressed when someone programs it. A wooden flute would not be my first choice to perform this contemporary piece (1946), however, Smith made it work. The range of the wooden flute again gave dynamic and tonal subtleties that Boulez wrote in...

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Mimi Stillman and Dolce Suono Ensemble: Concert Review

Posted by on Jan 1, 2015 in Concert Reviews, Featured, Issues, January 2015, Reviews | 0 comments

Mimi Stillman and Dolce Suono Ensemble: Concert Review

"Music of Spirit, Longing, and Passion" was the title of Mimi Stillman's Dolce Suono Ensemble concert on December 7th at the Old Pine Presbyterian Church in Philadelphia.   It was a beautiful concert that featured music of J.S. Bach, Handel, Haydn, Vivaldi, and Charles Abramovic.   The concert featured Mimi Stillman on flute, Misoon Ghim, mezzo-soprano, Yiying Julia Li, violin, Yumi Kendall, cello, and Charles Abramovic, piano and harpsichord. I was excited to hear the program, because I was unfamiliar with most of the works except the "La Folia" Variations (except these were Vivaldi's violin variations from his Trio Sonata in D Minor, not the common Marin Marais variations that we all know). Beginning with "Bist du bei mir,"  which I had thought was J.S. Bach's work (actually by Gottfried Heinrich Stolzel as Ms. Stillman explained), the concert began its theme of Emotions.   The text was very powerful.  "If you are with me, I will gladly go to [my] death and to my rest.  Ah, how pleasant would my end be if your dear, fair hands shut my faithful eyes!"  Ms. Ghim's voice blended very well with the flute and accompanying instruments in this arrangement. Bach's arias were also explored, as the ensemble beautifully played one from St. Matthew Passion ("Erbarme dich, mien Gott"), and two from his Cantatas ("Ich will dich all mien Leben lang" and "Vergnugte Ruh, beliebte Seelenlust").  The ensemble played with great passion, always fitting to the concept of the concert. "Laus D" by Charles Abramovic was a humorous take on Haydn, and I enjoyed watching the musicians having fun with the piece!  Mr. Abromovic quoted many Haydn works, such as his Sixth Symphony, Cello Concerto, and String Quartet, all in D major. Vivaldi's "La Folia" Variations were refreshing and technically executed by Ms. Stillman, Ms. Li, and Mr. Abromovic.  The variations were much different (and more spirited) than the Marais solo flute variations.  I like to play La Folia with some harmony, too, so I was pleased to hear this piece as a trio. I am excited to hear more from Dolce Suono Ensemble, and you should be too.  Their next concert on January 18 is a Tribute to Julius Baker and features Jeffrey Khaner.  Mark your...

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NYU Faculty Concert Review. By Fluterscooter

Posted by on Nov 4, 2014 in Concert Reviews, Featured, Issues, November 2014, Reviews | 0 comments

NYU Faculty Concert Review.  By Fluterscooter

"Flute music is alive and well in New York City," Brad Garner said before an almost full audience at the Frederick Loewe Theatre on October 21st.  The stellar lineup of artists on one concert was one that you would normally see at a National Flute Association Gala Concert, so to have Keith Underwood, Gary Schocker, Robert Dick, Brad Garner, and Soo-Kyung Park share a stage in New York City really made for a special night of flute music.   Keith Underwood opened the program playing baroque flute along with David Ross for J.S. Bach's Trio Sonata in D Major followed by Gary Schocker's original piece "Nachbach."  I particular enjoyed Schocker's piece, as it contained elements of Bach and Schocker's signature compositional style.  However, my favorite piece on the program was "Tracing Back" by Shen Yiwen.  The piece, played by Brad Garner, was originally written for Chinese dizi flute, and the composer gave Dr. Garner a special arrangement for transverse flute.  The Chinese melodies and style of dizi flute were very apparent in the piece, and Dr. Garner imitated the sound of the Chinese flute perfectly throughout the piece.  Robert Dick opened the second half of the program was Karg-Elert's Sonata Appassionata and then his original piece, "Sliding Life Blues" with the Glissando Headjoint.  I love Robert Dick's music and especially the whammy bar type of effects the Glissando headjoint is able to produce, so of course I really enjoyed this piece!  Soo-Kyung Park played Lukas Foss' "Three American Pieces" beautifully and expressively, and the concert ended with Gary Schocker and Keith Underwood playing Schocker's 2 flute and piano piece, "Danger High Voltage," which had fun Latin rhythms and flair. A side note:  We, as a flute community, need to continue to support our colleagues and fellow flutists.  Although this (free) concert was pretty full, I expected standing room.  I try and go to as many flute events that I can in my area, and this concert was actually the 3rd concert I saw in 4 days.  Maybe I just have more time on my hands or I just don't have a life (haha), but I love hearing others play and still continue to learn by hearing others' interpretations of flute music I know and also by hearing music I have never heard before.  Way too often I attend flute concerts with low attendance, and I have had this discussion with flutists in all parts of the country, and it seems as if this is a common trend recently.  The strength of the flute community lies within all of us, and we only get back what we give.  So lets all try and make more of an effort to support our local flute...

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