Issues

Interview with Brian Feliciano

Posted by on Mar 5, 2017 in Blog, Featured, Interviews, March 2017 | 0 comments

Interview with Brian Feliciano

Brian Feliciano started playing the flute when he was 9 years old  Today, this 14 year old is the winner of the Music Hero TV Show Competition in the Philippines.  Viviana Guzman interviews him and finds out the benefit of exposure on...

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The Flute View Young Artist Competition 2017

Posted by on Mar 5, 2017 in Blog, Featured, February 2017, March 2017 | 0 comments

The Flute View Young Artist Competition 2017

  The Flute View Young Artist Competition is open to young flutists who are under the age of 22 (ages 15-22) by June 1, 2017.   Each applicant must be a current subscriber to The Flute View Magazine.         Prizes: Altus Handmade Flutes 1st Prize $1,000   Wm. S. Haynes Co. 2nd Prize $500   2t Flute Academy 3rd Prize $250    Galway Flute Academy including a Skype lesson with Sir James Galway, Audience Favorite Prize $250 (based on number of YouTube Video views)   Repertoire:   1)  Johann Sebastian Bach:  Sonata in E minor movements 1 & 2 2)  Katherine Hoover:  Mountain and Mesa (pick one movement) 3)  Contrasting piece of your choice (if the piece has multiple movements, pick one movement)   Application Deadline is May 1st, 2017 at 11:59pm.   Please upload your videos and title them The Flute View 2017 Young Artist Competition. Each piece must be played in its entirety without edits.  Works may be performed accompanied or unaccompanied. Please submit an email to tfvcompetition@gmail.com and include 1) your name, 2) age, 3) two to three sentence bio and 4) the links to your YouTube submissions.  A $50 USD application fee (thru April 1st) or $75 USD application fee (thru May 1st)  must be paid using the Paypal button below to be considered in the competition.  Each applicant must be a current subscriber to The Flute View Magazine.   Good Luck!   $50 Application Fee thru April 1st:    $75 Application Fee thru May 1st:         Download printable PDF here:  The Flute View Young Artist Competition 2017 PDF...

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Cobus du Toit Flute Studio Interviews

Posted by on Mar 1, 2017 in Featured, Interviews, Issues, March 2017 | 0 comments

Cobus du Toit Flute Studio Interviews

  As part of our ongoing series of interviews with college flute studios across the United States, we interviewed Cobus du Toit, Assistant Professor of Flute at University of Massachusetts Amherst, and his students:  Isabelle Garland, Emily Kaplan, Alex Martin, Andrew Burden, Gloria Chiang, Katie Fejes, and Zachary Robarge We asked them about their passions, goals, inspirations, and advice they would offer to young students.      Cobus du Toit Assistant Professor of Flute, University of Massachusetts Amherst        Please list 3 pivotal moments that were essential to creating the artist that you've become.     As an undergraduate I desperately wanted to win the principal position with the National Youth Orchestra of South Africa. They scheduled a tour to Germany where we would perform Beethoven’s 5th Symphony in Bonn, Beethoven’s birthplace. Two failed auditions in previous years forced me to analyze and study my own playing very carefully. I knew that my playing had to show personality in addition to being fundamentally strong against the other players with naturally strong musical abilities. The preparation for that audition was a pivotal moment for my technical facility. Focused hard work paid off over raw musical talent. When an audience member was moved to tears during a recital, I realized performing had a therapeutic component that should be more important than our inner judgments about our own playing. We simply act as the conduit for bringing beauty back into the world. This realization transformed my playing and most of my performance anxiety went away since. Music is a subjective art form and you can’t base your self-worth as a musician on a panel’s opinion of you. A few years ago I performed as a finalist in a major competition and honestly thought that I would walk away victorious. When I did not receive any prize, of course I was very disappointment. After some reflection and discussion with the panel, I realized that I was able to convey musical gestures in exactly the way I wanted to and that was very empowering to me. From that point forward I committed to conjure up an emotional response from every single audience member, either positive or negative. The worst thing someone could say about a performance is that it was fine. I either want them to really dislike my artistic choices or fall in love with them.   What do you like best about performing and teaching? Performing – the sensation of improving everyday. I have become very interested in the art of practicing and how choices in the practice room influence my performances. The curiosity to improve my playing through skillful exploration has caused a major shift in my performing life. Recent repertoire choices also reflect this shift in the boundary of what I thought my limitations were. The idea of still improving in 30 years is exhilarating to me.   Teaching offers me the opportunity to become a more compassionate communicator. As educators we often meet students during times of frustration and self-doubt. When these emotional factors are combined with the stress of moving, making new friends and adjusting to college life, choice of words in lessons is incredibly important. It is possible to set a very high expectation without being dictatorial and I strive everyday to be more kind, compassionate and understanding...

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Thoughts from Mid-Atlantic Flute Fair by Fluterscooter

Posted by on Mar 1, 2017 in Articles, Featured, Issues, March 2017 | 0 comments

Thoughts from Mid-Atlantic Flute Fair by Fluterscooter

I'm back on the East Coast again, and I had a rare weekend off.  What to do with my free time?  Go to a flute fair, of course!  I hopped on the Megabus to D.C. to see if the Mid-Atlantic Flute Fair lived up to the hype.  And it certainly did!  The 2 day yearly event, sponsored by the Flute Society of Washington, is a chance to try out flutes from all the top makers, go to workshops and lectures, and listen to concerts.  I rarely get to go to a flute fair where I'm not working behind a booth, so it was very refreshing to just be able to enjoy the fair at my leisure.  Plus, I had some Fluterscooter bag dealers there, so it was good to see The Flutists Faire, Flutistry Boston, and Flute World, too! Flute fairs are always a great place to network. and even though I saw very many familiar faces, I was glad to have met some new ones.  One of them was Nancy Stignitta, fellow Powell Flutes artist and flute professor at the Interlochen Arts Academy.  She gave a workshop entitled "College Pre-screening Recordings and Live Auditions- Prepare with Confidence."  She offered sound advice on how to best prepare for auditions, not just for college, but for any professional audition.  The importance of walking into the audition room with confidence was tested on a student who did a mock audition.  The audition starts the minute you walk into the audition room, before you even start playing.  It is important to show confidence to the judges, because that will show that you are prepared for the audition.  Performance nerves were also discussed in the workshop, because who doesn't have them?!  The participants discussed factors that caused nerves and possible ways to overcomes nerves, and Ms. Stignitta gave a personal anecdote about nerves, and that she will never be "robbed" again because of nerves.  She uses the imagery of boxing gloves as strength when she goes into an audition, and that helps her with nerves every time. The next workshop I attended was one that was very familiar to me, since I often speak on the same subject.  Dr. Katherine Emeneth's workshop, "I have a Degree in Music…Now What?" was very informative and up to date, and I learned many things that I will incorporate into my own lectures on the subject.  Dr. Emeneth discussed forming your own chamber music group, building a teaching studio, and setting goals.  She touched on the importance of using social media to promote yourself, networking, subbing in local orchestras, and attending flute events, among other things.  Most importantly, she spoke about setting a goal you are passionate about and going for it, and not settling for something that doesn't align.  For example, don't try to teach if you don't like kids!  Do what works for you.   She cited examples of flutists who have created the own careers such as Greg Patillo with the Project Trio and Classical Revolution.  This lecture resonated a lot with me, because one of The Flute View's missions is to offer advice to flutists who are creating their own career paths.  Look for a guest post by Dr. Emeneth about the subject in the upcoming months! Lastly, I attended "The Flute Studio of the Future: Enhancing Your Music Curriculum...

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Marina Piccinini Artist Profile

Posted by on Mar 1, 2017 in Featured, Interviews, Issues, March 2017 | 0 comments

Marina Piccinini Artist Profile

  A daring artist with diverse musical interests, flutist Marina Piccinini is in demand worldwide as a soloist, chamber musician and recording artist. Internationally acclaimed for her interpretive skills, rich, expansive colors, technical command and elegant, compelling stage presence, Ms. Piccinini has been hailed by Gramophone as “the Heifetz of the flute."     Well-known for her commitment to new music and her history of first performances and commissions by some of today’s foremost composers, Ms. Piccinini gives the UK premiere of Pulitzer Prize winning composer Aaron Jay Kernis’s Flute Concerto, written and commissioned specifically for her, at London’s Royal Festival Hall with the London Philharmonic Orchestra, Andrés Orozco-Estrada conducting, this February 2017. This August 4, she performs the Summer Festival Premiere of the Kernis Concerto with conductor JoAnn Falletta and the Chautauqua Symphony Orchestra. She played the world premiere to great acclaim with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra in early 2016, with the Detroit Free Press stating, “Piccinini's gleaming virtuosity, including the variety of articulations and colors she drew from the flute, was a source of wonder," and American Record Guide, “she played it with absolutely breathtaking virtuosity.” This was following a highly acclaimed tour with the Vienna Symphony Orchestra the previous season, performing the Nielsen Flute Concerto under the baton of Jukka-Pekka Saraste. Highlights of recent seasons include a highly acclaimed tour with pianist Andreas Haefliger this past spring 2016; performances at London’s Wigmore Hall and Southbank Center; Tokyo’s Casals and Suntory Halls; the Seoul Arts Center; New York's Weill Hall at Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center's Alice Tully Hall, and Town Hall; the Mozartsaal in Vienna’s Konzerthaus, and at the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC.  Also of note is the world premiere performance of Matthew Hindson's House Music, a concerto for flute and orchestra, with Roberto Minczuk and the London Philharmonic Orchestra at London’s Queen Elizabeth Hall. While equally at home with contemporary and traditional works, Ms. Piccinini is deeply committed to music of the present, and expanding the repertoire for her instrument. She has given first performances of works by some of today’s foremost composers, including Michael Colgrass, Paquito D’Rivera, Matthew Hindson, Miguel Kertsman, Lukas Foss, Michael Torke, John Harbison, David Ludwig and Roberto Sierra. An active recording artist with CDs on the Avie, Claves, and ECM labels, Ms. Piccinini is the latest in a distinguished line of virtuosi to make the Paganini Caprices their own. Her new Paganini arrangements can be heard on her recent highly acclaimed recording for Avie. The printed music for Piccinini’s Paganini arrangements was published in autumn 2014 by Schott Music. Other recent recordings include Tre Voci’s acclaimed debut CD of works by Tōru Takemitsu, Claude Debussy and Sofia Gubaidulina on the ECM label; a DVD of Schoenberg’s Pierrot Lunaire from the Salzburg Festival, along with an accompanying documentary entitled Solar Plexus of Modernism; for Avie, the J.S.Bach’s complete flute sonatas and solo Partita in collaboration with the Brasil Guitar Duo, and the flute sonatas of Prokofiev and Franck with pianist Andreas Haefliger; and for Claves, Belle Epoque with pianist Anne Epperson, and sonatas by Bartok, Martinů, Schulhoff, Dohnanyi, and Taktakishvili with pianist Eva Kupiec. The first flutist to win the prestigious Avery Fisher Career Grant, Marina Piccinini’s career was launched when she won First Prize in the CBC Young Performers Competition...

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Elsa Nilsson Album Review

Posted by on Mar 1, 2017 in CD Reviews, Featured, Issues, March 2017, Reviews | 0 comments

Elsa Nilsson Album Review

Elsa Nilsson’s newest album, Salt Wind, is a breath of fresh air, amongst a sea of jazz. Each track is uniquely crafted, and diverse from the next one.  Nilsson’s compositions will be heralded by the most discriminating of today’s jazz affectionados.  Yet, each piece is appealing to listeners of all ages and backgrounds.  Nilsson composed each piece with a unique set of influences, and every composition tells a story. Being a native of Sweden, the melodies sound in Salt Wind are inspired by traditional folk music, but with a contemporary jazz twist. From the beginning to the end, Nilsson’s playing is full of color and life. The bass flute sounds buttery, and the C Flute sings through the registers with musicality and emotion. There are nine tracks on the album.  The first track, titled Tiny Bridges, Homemade Islands, is full of joy.  The melody is inspired by her time spent at her family’s chalet in the Alps, and sounds like a sunny morning by a lake that was experienced by Nilsson.  Another favorite of mine is the fourth track, titled Inside Brooklyn Thunder. This track is smokey and slow-paced. The composition was inspired by a cozy evening indoors, during a thunderstorm. I first listened to Inside Brooklyn Thunder while driving in the rain, and it was very complimentary to the ambience created by the weather outside my car.  As a long time fan of heavy metal music from Europe, the fifth track, Hedning exceeded my expectations for “Heavy Metal Flute.”  Even cooler, Nilsson sings in this composition, and is the author of the lyrics.  The word “Hedning” means “Heathen” in Swedish, and the roving bass line enforces these intense emotions. The flute solo is a virtuosic flurry of notes. I spent a lot of time listening to this album in my car, on the way to work. Every time I listen to each track, I discover something new- a thick guitar harmony, a creative drum riff, or contrapuntal bass line. The entire ensemble is in sync, on both a musical and technical level. At least once a day, a melody from this album will get stuck in my head. However, this is a good problem.  I hope that many more flutists and music enthusiasts will add this album to their library, and listen to it often.    -Rachel...

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Art for Social Change by Barbara Siesel

Posted by on Mar 1, 2017 in Articles, Entrepreneurship, Essays, Featured, Issues, March 2017 | 0 comments

Art for Social Change by Barbara Siesel

“In the face of Trump, many artists report feelings of paralysis. Should they carry on as before, nobly defying the ruination of public discourse? Or seize on a new mission, abandoning the illusion of aesthetic autonomy?” Alex Ross Above is a quote by Alex Ross in his article in the New Yorker entitled “Making Art in a Time of Rage.” He reminds us that classical musicians respond to adversity in a variety of ways, choosing to either go deeper into creating beauty as Leonard Bernstein so famously said shortly after the assassination of JFK. Here is an excerpt from the statement that Bernstein made at a fundraising event at Madison Square Garden: “This will be our reply to violence: to make music more intensely, more beautifully, more devotedly than ever before.” Or perhaps you are in a state of mind that you can’t create art until you’ve won the fight or cleared the space. Ross quotes Gwendolyn Brooks’s 1949 poem “First Fight Then Fiddle”: “. . . Carry hate In front of you and harmony behind. Be deaf to music and to beauty blind. Win war. Rise bloody, maybe not too late For having first to civilize a space Wherein to play your violin with grace.” But perhaps we want to consider these thoughts deeply and then choose to pursue a third approach. We can continue to create music more deeply and beautifully than before, do our very best, and then attach a social change addition to how the work is presented, funded or performed. We can keep growing our voices as artists and contribute to winning the fight as well! Here’s an example of a project that I think does just that. Fluterscooter has just released a new CD, and I asked her a few questions about the social impact of the new album: Barbara: Congratulations on your new CD- can you tell us about it?  What inspired you to make this recording? Fluter: I had always wanted to do a meditation album, but after the election, I was inspired to actually get into the studio and create it!  It is designed for meditation and healing, as we all need it in these trying times.  It was also inspired by working with the sacred teacher plants for the past year and a half, and it is currently played in healing ceremonies.  I composed, produced, and played most of the instruments on the whole album!  I finished it in a week and a half, too (lol). Barbara: Why did you choose the ACLU? https://www.aclu.org Fluter: I feel like that's a no-brainer.  People's rights are being threatened daily, whether it be their religion, gender, sexual orientation, or color of their skin.  Since the election, I've donated to them on a monthly basis, but I want to be able to help more, so I'm donating 25% of profits from this album to ACLU.  Also, I'm donating 100% of profits from my track "Standing Rock" to the WaterKeeper's Alliance (www.waterkeeper.org) Barbara: What advice would you give to other flutists who want to pursue an art for social change project? Fluter: Do it.  And do it NOW.  Music is a great way to help the organizations that need it so much right now! If you have an “Art for Social Change” project that you...

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Barbara Kortmann Inner Lights Album Review

Posted by on Mar 1, 2017 in CD Reviews, Featured, Issues, March 2017, Reviews | 0 comments

Barbara Kortmann Inner Lights Album Review

Barbara Kortmann shares with us in the opening essay in her new CD, Inner Lights: “the inner forces of being alive." She says “each of the works...has been a special ‘inner light’ for me over the past years." These beautiful thoughts inform the deep and sparkling performances on this extraordinary album. If you don’t already know her, Kortmann (b.1985) is a German flutist who has recently won a raft of competitions, and uniquely these competitions aren’t flute competitions but competitions where she competed against all instrumentalists!  She’s won prizes at the International Music Competition Jeunesses Musicales Bucharest, Aeolus Competition for Wind Instruments, and Markische Cultural Conference Competition (which she was the first flutist ever to win) among others. In 2016 she won the Rising Star Award at the International Sir James Galway Flute Festival. They chose well, because Ms. Kortman is an extraordinary player, whose fluid technique serves her musical mastery and unique, beautiful interpretations. Her performance of the Marias, Les Folies d’Espagne is full of interesting surprises that are musically insightful and sent me running to my score to think about! Each work on the album opened up new ways of thinking about the piece. Take a listen to her ideas in Bach’s Musical Offering and the two Vivaldi Concerto’s ‘Il Cardellino’ and ‘La Notte.' Every work is thought through but spontaneous in interpretation as well. Kortmann is accompanied by an expert group of strings including the excellent Hellen Weiss and Kerstin Linder-Dewan on violins and Sabine Erdmann on harpsichord. The chamber music is seamless and the pitch is perfect! The CD is available at Genuin Classics and at www.BarbaraKortmann.de and it is beautifully designed, with a complete booklet and interesting essays by Kortmann and Anna-Barbara Schmidt. The recording and editing are superb with the sound of a full orchestra achieved with a small string section and perfect balance maintained throughout. I highly recommend this CD!...

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Flutists of NAMM

Posted by on Feb 1, 2017 in Blog, Featured, February 2017, Interviews, Issues | 0 comments

Flutists of NAMM

The NAMM Show is one of the largest musical instrument trade shows, which takes place in Anaheim every January.  This was my 5th show and my first one as an exhibitor for Fluterscooter bags!   My favorite part of the show is catching up with old flute friends and meeting new ones. Everyone has a unique NAMM experience, and I got to catch up with a few flutists at the show to talk about their NAMM experience.     Josh Jonsson     Of all the music-industry shows around the world, NAMM has to be one of the biggest and most famous. For years I've wanted to go, and this year, I finally got my chance! 2017's NAMM show was my first one ever, and what an experience! It is by far the largest trade show I've ever been to (NFA will feel like a little village fair after this!), and though this is an article about flutists at NAMM, and most of you probably think of me as a flute player, I was actually there in my official capacity as a performing artist for Uebel clarinets. My primary function was to use my experience as a professional clarinetist and sort of "instrument wizard" to relate the features of these fantastic instruments that make them different from other makers to all the clarinetists who stopped by, and to demonstrate them whenever appropriate. It was an incredible few days, not only because I was able to, in a very direct and fulfilling way, work with quite a few fantastic players one-on-one and match them with the ideal instrument for them; but also because I ran into just about *everyone* I know in the entire music industry! It was like a huge party where everybody was too exhausted from working to be drunk, but still really happy to see each other and to be there. Can't wait for next year! (I also never want to hear another trumpet or trombone again)   Sarah Jane Hargis     I have always dreamed of attending the NAMM convention since I first heard about it MANY years ago. My experience over exceeded my expectations by far. I was so excited and honored to have had the opportunity to perform at NAMM on behalf of Earthquaker Devices and Altus/Azumi Flutes. So, what did I do exactly? I did what any gear junky would do! I walked onto the largest convention floor I have ever stepped foot on and hunted for Earthquaker Devices and Altus/Azumi Flutes. On my hunt, I was amazed at the tremendous amount of artists, artisans, and the sales staff of these small and large pieces of art we call instruments. Instruments of all sorts were alongside the various gadgets and tricks to make them or the player even better, enhanced or just plain fun toys. Throughout the weekend, I ran into some amazing artists performing their art right in front of me! I was constantly impressed and overjoyed to be around so much music! When I found the Earthquaker Devices stage I was in heaven!  They had every pedal they make on stage for me to play with! WOW! I was like a kid in a candy store trying to decide where to start.  On top of that, my performance with Lisa Bella Donna was...

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Robert Dick The Galilean Moons Album Review

Posted by on Feb 1, 2017 in CD Reviews, Featured, February 2017 | 0 comments

Robert Dick The Galilean Moons Album Review

Robert Dick has recently released his new CD, Galilean Moons. This intriguing groundbreaking album is a result of an extraordinary collaboration between two masters of extending the aural and technical possibilities of their respective instruments. Robert Dick, flute and Ursel Schlicht, piano, both virtuoso’s and visionaries around the combination of new music and improvisation share compositional title on all the works on the CD. Robert plays multiple flutes including the Glissando Headjoint, flute, piccolo, open hole alto flute, bass flute and contrabass flute, all with his usual virtuosity, insight, accuracy, humor and flare!   Schlicht is an excellent player, lyrical and beautiful when it’s called for and expert in prepared piano, percussive and brilliant rhythmically too.  They are a dynamic team.  I particularly liked Schlicht’s ‘A Lingering Scent of Eden for it’s combination of lyrical expressive writing and contrasting jazzy and evocative extended techniques. The piece describes a chapter in Alan Wiseman’s “The World Without Us” that tell us about undisturbed landscapes, never manipulated by humans.  It’s an interesting concept in our urbanized lives.   I also love Dick’s amazing work, “Dark Matter” for contrabass flute and piano.  It’s a truly humorous piece as Robert uses nonsense texts that internet spammers affix to emails to try and elude spam filters.  Dick became fascinated by how the random texts “Sometimes …say really amazing things”.  Dick recites the text and together Schlicht and Robert match the text with their own musical responses.     The other pieces on the CD are, Ursel  Schlict’s  “Tendrils” Robert Dick’s Sic Bisquitus Disintegrat and Life Matter and by both composers, the title score of the CD “The Galilean Moons”, a piece that creates beautiful and complex sound paintings based on the four moons of the planet Jupiter.  I hope you will take the time to listen to the album as it is a wondrous journey into intricate, challenging and beautiful sounds for flute, that expands our understanding of what’s possible for flutes both compositionally and technically....

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