Issues

In Memoriam: Tribute to Phil Dikeman

Posted by on Jun 1, 2017 in Blog, Featured, Issues, June 2017 | 0 comments

In Memoriam: Tribute to Phil Dikeman

Philip Dikeman, Associate Professor of Flute, was a member of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra for almost 20 years. During his tenure with the DSO, he held the position of Assistant Principal Flute, as well as Acting Principal Flute for his final two seasons. He also appeared as concerto soloist with the DSO on numerous occasions and took part in various tours to Europe, Asia, Florida, The Hollywood Bowl and Carnegie Hall. This current concert season of 2016-17, he was invited to assume the position of Acting Principal Flute with the Nashville Symphony. Dikeman attended the Oberlin College Conservatory of Music, where he studied with Robert Willoughby and received his Bachelor of Music. He received his Master of Music from the Yale School of Music, studying with Thomas Nyfenger. He was named the George Wellington Memorial Scholar for his outstanding musical and academic excellence upon completion of his degree at Yale University. Immediately after graduation, Dikeman began his professional career when he was appointed Principal Flute of the Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra, a position he held for five seasons. Prior to joining the Detroit Symphony in the fall of 1992, he played Principal Flute for a short time with the San Antonio Symphony. He has also played Guest Principal Flute with both the Minnesota Orchestra and the St. Louis Symphony, and Guest Associate Principal Flute with the Los Angeles Philharmonic. In competition, Dikeman holds the distinction of having won first prize in both the National Flute Association’s (NFA) Young Artist and Orchestral Audition Competitions. In chamber music, Dikeman was a member of the Detroit Chamber Winds & Strings for 18 seasons. His performances with DCWS included regular appearances on their subscription series, as well as various tours including Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall and Lucerne, Switzerland. He was also a featured performer for the Great Lakes Chamber Music Festival while still a member of the DSO. He has made recital and masterclass appearances throughout the United States, including Los Angeles, Boston, Chicago, Cleveland and Interlochen. Dikeman is on the faculty of the Summer Arts Camp at the Interlochen Center for the Arts. He has taught there for the last five seasons as a Valade Fellow, Instructor of Flute. In 2014, he was honored to accept the role of Program Chair for the National Flute Association's 2014 Convention held in Chicago, aptly titled "Perform, Inspire, Educate!" Also, in the spring of 2015 he traveled to Berlin with the Blair Woodwind Quintet to play a concert at the invitation of the Berlin Philharmonic Woodwind Quintet. Philip Dikeman was a close friend to many at Powell Flutes Boston.  His talent, impeccable musicianship and infectious laugh are deeply missed. In every artist's career, there are mentors who raise up their students and drive their growth.  For Philip, it was Mr. Robert Willoughby at the Oberlin College Conservatory of Music and Mr. Tom Nyfenger at Yale University.  These two great men provided the foundation for Philip's career and pedagogic philosophy.  Through their teaching, Philip gained a mastery of nuanced performance which he in turn passed on to his students. In 1998 Philip was the first place winner of the National Flute Association Young Artist Competition, seventeen years later, his student, Ramakrishnan Kumaran won first place. To honor Philip's legacy and artistry, Powell Flutes is proud to sponsor the...

read more

Emily Skala: Artist Interview

Posted by on Jun 1, 2017 in Blog, Featured, Interviews, Issues, June 2017 | 0 comments

Emily Skala: Artist Interview

Emily Skala has been the Principal Flutist of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra since 1988 and a faculty member of the Peabody Institute since 1989. Recent years have provided substantial opportunity for international travel to Brazil, the United Kingdom, France and Germany, to perform on tour and at music festivals worldwide: Southbank Centre’s “The Rest Is Noise” Festival (UK), Campos do Jordao Winter Festival (Brazil), and Carnegie Hall. An expert in orchestral repertoire, Ms. Skala has performed, adjudicated, taught, and commissioned new works at the National Flute Association’s annual conventions.   Can you give us 5 career highlights?   It is interesting to me to realize that when I look back on my career in a thoughtful retrospection and self-assessment, all the concerts, rehearsals, auditions, recitals, competitions, chamber music, the classes, rather bleed together and form a rolling sea of feelings and sensations that hardly distinguish themselves one from the other. They all seem to pour together and form my way of being. But just as in any ocean a creature will jump out from the deep and amaze the onlookers as they surface or fly, my special experiences stand out and can momentarily be seen more vividly than most. Your question has made me search my memory banks! Here is what I have stirred up:    1     Itzhak Perlman's compliment of my Brahms Symphony #4 solo. He loved the unforced low notes at the end! Something he never gets to hear. Validation from artists on this level is extremely meaningful. Even if it is about only one or two notes.    2     Making the semifinals of the 2014 Berlin Philharmonic Principal Flute search; being the only American flutist to achieve this; and being one of only two women to advance to this level. It was the most fun audition experience I ever had (in fact, I didn't know they could be fun)! I felt like I had truly accomplished something that day. And while I was there, I was able to listen to an afternoon rehearsal of Schubert's "Rosamunde" Overture. The orchestra was supposed to have performed that week's concert under Claudio Abbado's leadership. Sadly, Maestro Abbado had passed away four months earlier. They kept his program in tact, however, and played the Schubert without conductor as an homage to this important musician. It was Abbado's favorite piece. The richness of the sonorities that emerged from the orchestra and dedication to musical collaboration and expression among the musicians of the Berlin Philharmonic was breathtaking. I will never forget this sound. It was something I have never heard before and never expect to hear again, unless I can manage to fit more travel into my life! All the stories we hear about this orchestra are true. So if you can afford to go, you must hear the Berlin Philharmonic in the Berlin Philharmonie!    3     I cannot forget the Aspen Festival Orchestea's performance of Mahler's Symphony #3, with the late and wonderfully musical Maestro Sergiu Comissiona conducting. In this performance I worked side by side with my first great mentor and Principal Flutist of the Aspen Festival Orchestra, Albert Tipton. All this when I was just 16 years old. This week of wondrous music making confirmed my love of orchestral flute playing. I knew I was doing absolutely the right thing....

read more

Texas Flute Festival Overview

Posted by on Jun 1, 2017 in Articles, Blog, Featured, June 2017 | 0 comments

Texas Flute Festival Overview

The 40th Annual Texas Flute Society Flute Festival was held on May 18 to 20, 2017, in the charming town of Denton, Texas at the Texas Women's University.  This festival, which has in the past presented such flute stars as Paula Robison, Carol Wincenc, Greg Pattillo, Christina Jennings, Gary Schocker, etc presented this year three diverse and thrilling flutists, Nestor Torres, Viviana Guzman, and Timothy Hagen.   The primary focus of the Texas Flute Festival is to light a spark in the minds and hearts of young flutists by encouraging them to participate in the festival by performing, competing and attending workshops and concerts by the aforementioned virtuosos.  Judging from the high level of the performances of the students in the competitions, the Texas Flute Festival seems to be meeting their goals. The winners of this year’s  Myrna W. Brown Artist Competition were as follows: 1st Place - Drew Powell 2nd Place - Won Lee 3rd Place - Nicholas Goodwin Mehrdad Gholam also turned in a fine performance. The Donna Marie Haire Young Artist Competition Winners were as follows: 1st Place - Subin Cho 2nd Place - Yeongjae Jo Sara Hyeeum Jeong and Hannah Kim also presented notable capabilities. Link to the awards: Texas Flute Festival  President Jennifer Kirby infused the festival with a warmth and efficiency that made the event a pleasure to attend.   In fact, the whole Society Board was incredibly welcoming and helpful to the attendees and performers, true Southern hospitality.  The Guest Artists' concerts were both eclectic and riveting.   Nestor Torres included captivating original and jazz favorites by Herbie Mann, Chick Corea, Cole Porter and Harold Arlen accompanied by UNT musicians, Jose M. Aponte, drums, Christian Valdez, piano, Michael Luzecky, bass.  Viviana Guzman, accompanied by Anastasia Markina, presented works by Gary Schocker, Monti, and Piazzolla and provided a vibrant video backdrop to some of her own compositions.   The brilliant and inspiring, Timothy Hagen, also accompanied by Anastasia Markina, presented his own composition as well as works by Welcher, Schumann, Hindemith, Telemann and Hue.  The three guest artists sat on several competition panels as well as presenting Workshops and Masterclasses that were included throughout the days’ activities. The festival sponsors were the Haire Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts, Texas Commission on the Arts, Altus Flutes, Sherry Lee, Woodwind and Brasswind, Floot Fire, Brannen Brothers, Carolyn Nussbaum, Drelinger, Gemeinhardt, Jupiter, Music & Arts, Williamson Music and Yamaha. These sponsors deserve recognition for helping provide an opportunity for young flutists to be inspired and pick up tips and help them along in their musical paths.  Various Flute Choirs conducted by Shauna Kay Thompson, Felix Torres, Melissa Arthur, Julee Kim Walker, Ellen Kaner, Lisa Book, provided lovely concerts throughout the festival.  The festival ended with a Gala Performance featuring the three Guest Artists, Torres, Guzman and Hagen, and culminated in a delightful and innovative play/performance by UTA’s Maverick Flute...

read more

A Summer Practice Plan. By Dr. Tammy Evans Yonce

Posted by on Jun 1, 2017 in Articles, Education, Essays, Featured, Issues, June 2017 | 0 comments

A Summer Practice Plan.  By Dr. Tammy Evans Yonce

As the school year ends, many students are joyously looking forward to some relaxation and perhaps a break from the flute. Some students spend the summer working in order to have enough saved to pay for living expenses for the upcoming school year. While it’s a good, healthy idea to rest and recharge, and it’s often necessary to commit to earning a sum of money, it is also important to not lose the momentum and skills that are the result of many hours of diligent practice over the quickly ending school year. How do we balance the need for respite and work with the desire to keep growing as a musician? There are a couple of challenges that need to be addressed that often stand in the way of our musical progress during the summer. When school is over and we’re off on summer adventures, we often don’t have the benefit of regularly scheduled lessons with our teacher. The frequent encouragement and support received during those lessons is absent, and that can have an effect on our motivation. There is also much less accountability; if we know we won’t have the opportunity to check in with someone, the temptation to delay practicing is there. How can we stay motivated if our schedule has suddenly been turned upside down with travel, work, down time, pursuing other interests, and little to no contact with a teacher? Here are a few suggestions: Find a practice buddy to help keep accountability. Maybe there is a friend in your flute studio who also wants to keep their skills sharp over the summer. Check in with that person once a week to discuss what you’ve been working on and what your plan for the upcoming week is. They will do the same, and you will keep each other encouraged and motivated.   Come up with a project for yourself. Summer can be a fantastic time to explore flute technique and literature. Often we are working for very specific goals during the school year such as juries, recitals, lessons, and so forth. During the summer we can be a bit more exploratory with our practice. Maybe there are several pieces you’ve really wanted to work on but haven’t gotten to yet. Now is the perfect time! Perhaps you’d like to move beyond the major and minor scales; work on blues scales, whole tone scales, or another variety entirely. How is your double- and triple-tonguing? This would be a fantastic opportunity to work hard on that.   Explore the flute repertoire of a particular era. Maybe you’ve worked on a lot of music from the Classical period. Why not take this time to explore the Baroque (or Romantic, or 20th Century, or contemporary) repertoire? If you’re close to your school library, check out as many pieces from the era as you can find. Find high-quality recordings of these works, and follow along with the scores as you listen. In the absence of physical scores, check out those pieces that happen to exist in the public domain on IMSLP.org. Learn how they fit into the historical context; why were they written? What was their function? Are there any particular aspects of performance practice that need to be observed?   Record yourself. Sometimes this can be very uncomfortable for people...

read more

Righteous Girls: Concert Review

Posted by on Jun 1, 2017 in Concert Reviews, Featured, Issues, June 2017, Reviews | 0 comments

Righteous Girls: Concert Review

Righteous Girls, a duo of Gina Izzo (flute) and Erika Dohi (piano), is not your typical flute and piano duo.  I wasn't really sure what to expect when attending their Lincoln Center debut sponsored by Chamber Music New York, but I was impressed and entranced throughout their entire program of music composed after the year 2000. What was unique about Righteous Girls was their use of live electronics and looping, adding many more layers to the traditional flute and piano ensemble, giving a full spectrum of sound that one does not usually hear.  All the music was very contemporary but nothing too atonal and all sonically pleasing, much of it with minimalist influences.  The repertoire was unique and fresh, unknown (yet) to the flute community, but I see their music having its place there soon.  It was quite refreshing for me to hear a program of flute and piano pieces I have never heard before.  Their program was virtually seamless, with each piece flowing into the next. Righteous Girls also composes some of their music, using reverb, delay, and some live processed effects.  My favorite piece, and the standout of the evening, was their arrangement of Andy Ahiko's 21 (originally for cello and steel pan drum).  I was amazed by the various looping, pedals, and even addition of a bass drum.  The piece was lively, rhythmic, visually interesting, and I kept wanting to hear more! On Andy Akiho’s 21, I was using three different foot pedals to navigate my way through the piece. The first one was a pedal for my iPad page turn, as there are not many (if any) points throughout the piece where I can focus on removing my hands from the flute to turn the page. Ideally in the future, this will be memorized to have one less ‘thing’ to focus on! The second pedal is a loop pedal. The piece opens with two lines that we then loop throughout the entire work; plucking of piano strings as well as mallets hitting inside the piano on its beams. Throughout the piece I am faced with the task of triggering these two loops on cue. The third pedal arranged into the flute part was a kick drum (Erika was managing the tambourine kick). At many points throughout the piece, I would be playing both the notated flute part, kick drum, loop pedal, and page turn at the same time! Kinda like driving a car...Gina Izzo Righteous Girls has a very bright future ahead of them, and I look forward to hearing more of their music and music they commission.  Righteous Girls is the future of the flute and piano duo.   -Fluterscooter...

read more

Entrepreneurship: Startups for Musicians. By Barbara Siesel

Posted by on Jun 1, 2017 in Entrepreneurship, Featured, Issues, June 2017 | 0 comments

Entrepreneurship: Startups for Musicians.  By Barbara Siesel

Unless you’ve been in the practice room for 24 hours a day for the last 10 years you’ve probably heard the term “Startup." Wikipedia defines a Start-up: A startup company (startup or start-up) is an entrepreneurial venture which is typically a newly emerged, fast-growing business that aims to meet a marketplace need by developing or offering an innovative product, process or service. A startup is usually a company such as a small business, a partnership or an organization designed to rapidly develop a scalable business model. Here are some famous start-ups that you know: Facebook, Airbnb, Instagram, Pinterest, Angry Birds, and many more, that in a short amount of time became household words. You might be asking, how does this apply to me? I play the flute!!   I got to thinking about start-ups for musicians. Maybe you have a great idea that can be turned into a business that can grow big! A big idea that flutists, musicians, educators, innovators might like to use. Start-up businesses are usually tech based companies but they don’t necessarily have have to be. Let’s unpack the definition of a startup. It’s an entrepreneurial venture- The Flute View has been discussing Entrepreneurship for some time now and many entrepreneurial flutists have been highlighted in these pages. “ A new and fast-growing business that aims to meet a marketplace need” – that’s the exciting idea part of the startup and every time I attend a flute conference or festival there is a new product that I didn’t know I needed and now I do!  Think of lefreQue Sound Bridges, for example, www.lefreque.com. The company is filling a need, is fast growing, and is an innovative product! The rest of the sentence “developing or offering an innovative product, process or service” – do you have a new way of teaching or learning (process)? Are you offering a new service- (hmmm what about The Flute View? We’re serving flutists in a new way) is your product innovative- like Fluterscooter’s cool, elegant bags?   The definition uses the words “scalable business model” which means can it grow and reach a large number of people, grow on a large scale. In flute land that would mean can or would many flutists use your service, product or process? When thinking about the flute community the last requirement seems like the most difficult to achieve. What could you create that large numbers of flutists, professional, amateur and students might use, how big is the market really? To scale in a big way you might have to expand your thinking to include other musicians and educators, and both Fluterscooter and lefreQue have expanded to include other instruments for their businesses. Perhaps they found that our market wasn’t quite big enough to “scale." There are some events that can help you see if you have a viable startup. On June 9-11 at Hostos Community College in the Bronx, NY, Startup Weekend Education is holding a 3 day "create your startup" event.  It sounds like fun – on Friday you form into groups and you spend time creating your startup, getting coached and mentored and learning a lot, you then present your new business on Sunday! In NYC there are Meetups every day that can help you learn about the process and help you test...

read more

New Friends at the New Music Gathering. By Rachel Hacker

Posted by on Jun 1, 2017 in Articles, Essays, Featured, Issues, June 2017 | 0 comments

New Friends at the New Music Gathering.  By Rachel Hacker

I adore flute events as much as the next person, but attending a non-flute focused conference was a welcomed breath of fresh air. Having been to a lot of flute fairs named the “Northeastern/central/whatever college organization-Flute Workshop,” I expected the New Music Gathering to be the same as a flute fair. I anticipated a bento-box style sampling of lectures, performances, and open master classes. Two or more events will feature a guest artist, and another will discuss “entrepreneurship” in the broadest of contexts. Meanwhile, a clinician will try to teach the entirety of a specialty topic in 50 minutes. The congested exhibit hall contains a jungle of flutes that stick straight up like trees underneath a florescent light “sun.” Colleagues of distant years, and alumni of the host university, will congregate in recital hall lobbies, and speak in altissimo ranges, as to express genuine, or sometimes fake, excitement. I may sound jaded on flute conventions, but I’ll still be found at as many of them as possible, simply because I think the flute is the coolest instrument ever. I’ll also continue to shell out money for airfare and hotels, until some schmuck with a big brain invents “virtual reality flute fairs” that can be attended from the comfort of our living rooms. Unless a virtual reality world consumes our lives, I’ll continue to be found in person, roaming the hallways of collegiate music buildings, or oversized convention centers, for a few days at a time. Perhaps my own apprehension towards flute fairs is simply because I was ready to attend something new. I needed something that focused less on competitions and the retail aspects, and focused more on the people in attendance. Flute fair structures can be too formal for my tastes, and rarely offer enough opportunities for networking. Flute fairs are put in the awkward position of attempting to appeal a huge disparity of ages and interest levels. My dream for the future of flute fairs has been inspired by something that was not a flute fair, but instead, the 2017 New Music Gathering. The host university for 2017 was Bowling Green State University- with a large and well-equipped assortment of classrooms and performance spaces. Five New York-based composers founded the conference in 2015: Daniel Felsenfeld, Lainie Fefferman, Matt Marks, Jascha Narveson, and Mary Kouyoumdjian.   Each of the founders is immensely an intelligent, personable, funny, and humble individual, with a list of impressive accolades. As a current resident of the Cincinnati area, my drive to Bowling Green was a monotonous 2.5-hour drive straight up Interstate 75. Although the facilities of Bowling Green were a great place for the conference, I found the city itself to be somewhat isolated. The next major city was Toledo- about 30 minutes north of us, and Dayton was south of BG by about 1.5 hours. Nevertheless, the city of Bowling Green greeted me with a level of predictability that embodied my upbringing. Ohio towns are earnest, self sufficient, and comfortable, and Bowling Green was no different. I opted to stay at a Days Inn room by myself. The room had no windows, and was located just a few hundred feet from the noisy interstate. My hotel selection was less than perfect, but hey, they gave me a conference rate of $45 dollars a...

read more

9 Checklists for Practicing Technical Passages. By Kristyn Son

Posted by on Jun 1, 2017 in Articles, Essays, Featured, Issues, June 2017 | 0 comments

9 Checklists for Practicing Technical Passages.  By Kristyn Son

  As flutists, we are often challenged by the composers to push our limits with technical demands. With the nature of the instrument, it is important that we embrace and feel confident playing fast rather than being fearful about it. I have provided 9 checklists for flutists at any level to help practicing in most efficient manner for successful performances. Are you playing all the notes that are given by the composer? I often times find the students skipping notes because they feel the pressure to play fast and/or due to uneven fingers, ultimately resulting moving ahead of the tempo. Every note by a composer serves a purpose, regardless of the speed which leads us to the next checklist. Are you practicing from the slow tempo? I am sure that almost every young flutist has heard “work from a slow tempo” from their teachers. In order to attain complete control over your fingers, it is absolutely true that you have to work from a slow and comfortable tempo and work your way up to a faster tempo. Here is one more aspect to think about though. Have you practiced your technical passages at faster tempi? The beauty of live performances is that we never know what is going to happen. With the excitement when performing, we might start a piece at a faster tempo or your pianist might speed up with excitement. It is always good to be prepared. Are you doing everything written on the page, i.e. articulation, dynamics, breaths and etcetera? A performer is job is to serve as a bridge between the composer and audience. In order to accomplish our job, we have to understand the intentions of the composer. Markings given by the composer serves as great hints. It is very important that we value every marking and try to interpret in order to understand the composer’s intentions. Are you taking deep breaths? Playing fast passages require faster pacing and often times, we are busy concentrating on our fingers. However, are you remembering to take deep breaths? The movement of the air is what creates the sound on the flute. Delivering the fast passages well to the audience can only be done with deep breaths. Also, accidents are likely to occur when the air is running out with lack of oxygen to our brain. Are you playing in tempo? Surprisingly, the students often go faster on their fast scale passages. It is important to check with the metronome and stretch the fast notes within the beat as much as possible for a better delivery. Are you listening to your sound? Obviously, you will be focused on your fingers and the moving notes, but are you focusing on the quality of the sound as well? When a passage requires fast tonguing, playing into your flute will help with the core of the sound. Are you building tension before the fast passages? I often observe students’ eyes enlarging as they get closer to the music just before the fast passages. We perform our best when our body is relaxed and as easy as it sounds, on the contrary, we have to practice playing relaxed. It is essential to check if you are building tension before the fast passages and if it is reflected physically i.e. tense fingers,...

read more

Christopher Caliendo: 2T Flute Academy Interview

Posted by on Jun 1, 2017 in Featured, Interviews, Issues, June 2017 | 0 comments

Christopher Caliendo: 2T Flute Academy Interview

What is the 2t Academy?     The 2t Flute Academy (www.2tacademy.com) is an online global event featuring 25 of the most popular flutists sharing their success stories in one-hour documentary interviews. The 2T Flute Academy provides young musicians an opportunity to learn how their favorite flute artists became successful by observing the choices they made immediately after graduating college. The opening ceremonies begin Sunday, June 11, at 11:00 am PST, and the closing summit is June 18, when I will announce all the sponsor prizes and distribute my success formula for flutists based on my research and study of the success traits of these unique artists. Why did you decide to create the 2t Academy?   The 2t Flute Academy was inspired by my belief that flutists could benefit from an affordable online school whose primary focus is on the success stories of many of their favorite flutists. To accomplish this, my team chose video. During our research, we discovered that one minute of video is equal to 1.8 million words and about 3,600 web pages. This equals a stronger emotional connection, greater affordability and a higher customer-conversion and retention rate. In addition, companies I revere and emulate, such as The Great Courses, feature the best of the best college courses on video so you can enjoy learning on your own time and in your own desired location via computer or smartphone. Biography also features the life stories of various historical figures and celebrities on video. Both of these formats use video because it communicates information faster, and the process is more entertaining and enjoyable. The 2t Flute Academy continues this standard of learning by focusing on the choices flutists make after graduation day.  Studying these choices helps us understand how these flutists’ artistic vision was shaped. Through video, 2T Flute members will learn quickly the success process of their favorite flutists and how they promoted themselves toward self-discovery. During our closing ceremonies on June 18, REGULAR and VIP members of the 2T Flute Academy will receive a PDF of all the 25 flutists’ distinguishing characteristics. These characteristics will be analyzed, broken down and formatted into a success method so we can all learn together as one community. In addition, the interviews will provide members with a valuable shortcut to discovering ideas and approaches that they may wish to incorporate into their own journey and development. In essence, the 2t Flute Academy provides flutists mentors at a distance. I also explored the 2t Flute Academy as an alternative to the National Flute Association (NFA) for people who can’t afford the flight, hotel, registration and food costs. The NFA will continue to benefit from a physical location where many young flutists can hear and meet their favorite artists. However, the NFA may be limited in its global outreach and therefore unable to successfully influence every flutist in the world. Similar to the NFA, we have an online exhibitor’s hall whose links navigate the member to sheet music, CDs and method books promoted by the artist. There are two memberships: Regular membership is priced at $9.99 and VIP at $39.99. Regular members will have live access to all 25 interviews and a chance to win a handmade Brent Haines Grenadillo Native American Indian flute. VIP members will have unlimited access...

read more

Noemi Gyori: Album Review

Posted by on Jun 1, 2017 in CD Reviews, Featured, Issues, June 2017, Reviews | 0 comments

Noemi Gyori: Album Review

Glowing Sonorities, the recent album released by flutist Noemi Gyori and pianist Katalin Csillagh, is a feast of Romantic music. This collection was crafted with obvious care and intention. The pieces themselves as well as the order in which they are presented was well thought-out to provide the maximum musical effect to the listener. In Gyori’s capable hands, these works shine, despite the fact that the Schubert and the Franck pieces were not originally written for flute. They seem entirely idiomatic to the flute thanks to fine editions and the performer’s excellent interpretations. The deliberate selection of the “oldest Steinway model available” according to the liner notes also adds to the rich timbre of the ensemble. The liner notes to the album are fascinating and truly well done. Gyori gives context for the flute during the Romantic era and also outlines some of the challenges in performing transcriptions of works originally composed for string instruments. The CD takes us on a tour of the Romantic era; the Schubert begins the collection with a representation of the elegance of the Romantic era, the Reinecke is “a true jewel of the original repertoire for flute and piano duo,” and the Franck exhibits the musical qualities of the late Romantic era. Overall, this is an excellent, high-quality album featuring beautiful playing and clear phrasing. Gyori and Csillagh are successful at keeping the drama of the Romantic era at the center of their interpretations of these three delightful works. To learn more about Noémi Gyori, visit her website at www.noemigyori.com. Glowing Sonorities Hungaroton HCD 32767 Noémi Gyori, flute Katalin Csillagh, piano Sonata for Arpeggione and Piano in A Minor, D. 821 – Franz Schubert Allegro moderato Adagio Allegretto Sonata for Flute and Piano in E Minor, Op. 167 “Undine” – Carl Reinecke Allegro Allegretto vivace Andante tranquillo Allegro molto agitato ed appassionato, quasi Presto Sonata for Violin and Piano in A Major – César Franck Allegretto ben moderato Allegro Recitativo-Fantasia. Ben moderato Allegretto poco mosso   -Tammy Evans...

read more