Issues

Robert Langevin: Artist Interview/Concert Review

Posted by on Jun 5, 2018 in Featured, Interviews, Issues, June 2018 | 0 comments

Robert Langevin: Artist Interview/Concert Review

With the start of the 2000–01 season, Robert Langevin joined the New York Philharmonic as Principal Flute, in The Lila Acheson Wallace Chair. In May 2001, he made his solo debut with the Orchestra in the North American premiere of Siegfried Matthus’s Concerto for Flute and Harp with Philharmonic Principal Harp Nancy Allen and Music Director Kurt Masur. His October 2012 solo performance in Nielsen’s Flute Concerto, conducted by Music Director Alan Gilbert, was recorded for inclusion in The Nielsen Project, the Orchestra’s multi-season traversal of all of the Danish composer’s symphonies and concertos, to be released by Dacapo Records. The Flute View's Barbara Siesel caught up with Robert Langevin to ask him a few questions about his career and his life. You can learn more about him on the NY Philharmonic’s website. Can you share 5 career highlights? As far as career highlights, one could say that studying with the teachers below was a highlight as well as winning my first orchestra job in Montreal; one always wonders if one will be able to win an audition... Another highlight was taking part in the Canadian premiere of Pierre Boulez' "Le marteau sans maître" in 1985, celebrating his 60th birthday and broadcasted live to all French speaking radio stations in Europe. Another one was playing the complete "explosante-fixe" also by Boulez in 2012 at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and at Symphony Space in New York City with the sound technicians from IRCAM doing the sonorisation and computer electronics. Tell us about your education and your mentors. I studied at the Montreal Conservatory with Jean-Paul Major for 6 years. Upon graduation, I went to study with Aurèle Nicolet for 2 years in Freiburg, Germany and then for a semester with Maxence Larrieu at the Geneva Conservatory in Switzerland. I also studied with him for 3 summers at the Nice Academy. In addition, I attended two summer classes in England and Scotland with James Galway. What pivotal moments were essential to you in creating the artist that you are? The pivotal moments were certainly studying with the gentlemen named above; without them I wouldn't be the player I am now. You can also say that some of the great conductors I have had the chance to work with in the three orchestras I have been in have certainly inspired and guided me as well as some of the extraordinary soloists we have had the privilege of collaborating with over the years. What do you like best about performing? Teaching? What I like best about performing is that every night one has to re-create what is written on the page and adding one's vision of what the composer might have meant while respecting his style. When making a program for a recital or a chamber music concert, I like to find pieces that may be unjustly unknown but which I feel deserve to be heard; it is amazing to find that some pieces are not played or known by the audience but really have value. I also feel that too often, orchestra’s program the same repertoire and that there could be a lot more curiosity on the part of those who are in charge of programming. Share with us a bit about a day in the life of the principal flutist...

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Dr. G’s June Flute Horoscopes

Posted by on Jun 5, 2018 in Dr. G's Flute Horoscopes, Featured, Issues, June 2018 | 0 comments

Dr. G’s June Flute Horoscopes

The big news this month is that Mars will be going retrograde at the end of June until the end of August (aka. the Summer of Mars Retrograde). Whenever Mars goes retrograde, your energy for basically everything is zapped, often leading to frustration and angry, Aries-like temper tantrums. Knowing this ahead of time will help you come up with a reasonable plan to chill out during the summer months. Go to the beach. Head to the library. Do some yoga. Take a few Alexander Technique lessons. Do whatever you can to give yourself a break this summer. Wait until after Labor Day to start your engines again. Until then, relax and practice on! Gemini (May 21-June 20) The month begins with Venus in your 2nd house of income, helping you to attract more money into your life. Wedding season is upon us, after all, making this a great time to organize a group to perform at weddings. Venus is the goddess of love – perfect for wedding gigs! If you live near the beach or a winery, design some beautiful business cards to pass along to wedding planners, hotels, and local businesses to get the word out about your group. All month Jupiter will be in a trine with Neptune between your 6th and 10th houses. Your career is booming and your intuition is on fire. Search for performing gigs that speak to you. Is there a summer orchestra that is recruiting local musicians for festival performance. Go ahead and audition! Have you been invited to teach at a summer music camp? Pack your bags! If your health has not been great lately, this is also a good opportunity to heal. Practice Alexander Technique and tune in to how you may be misusing yourself. Mercury moves into your 2nd house of income on June 13th, helping you advertise your new performing group far and wide. This will inevitably attract more opportunities for paid gigs around your area. A New Moon in your 1st house on the same day (June 13th) puts the spotlight on you, making you quite popular during this time. You may find yourself wanting a makeover. This is a good time to shop for new, wedding appropriate, multi-functional yet stunning, performance outfits. Remember: Concert Black does not need to be Concert Blah. Venus moves into your 3rd house of communications on June 14th. This is a great day to blog about something that interests you about the flute. Write about some of your experiences as a wedding performer. Your finances are again in the spotlight on June 22nd, when the Sun enters your 2nd house of income, followed by a Full Moon in your 8th house of banking, loans, and joint finances on June 28th. This indicates that you are definitely raking in the chips with various performing and teaching responsibilities, but instead of just splurging on concert tickets to a great summer show, you will be saving your money in the bank (perhaps for a new instrument purchase later this summer). Mars will be going retrograde on June 27th which will zap your energy for the next couple of months. This will happen in your 9th house of travel. Try not to fly off the handle if you have travel delays or if vacation plans...

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The Caffeinated Flutist. by Mary Hales

Posted by on Jun 5, 2018 in Articles, Essays, Featured, Issues, June 2018, Lifestyle | 0 comments

The Caffeinated Flutist. by Mary Hales

The Caffeinated Flutist, Vol. 1: Wish Me Luck!/Maintaining a Professional Presence on Social Media Wish me luck!  This is my first article contributing to The Flute View, and I’m so excited to see where this journey takes me.  I run a WordPress blog called Flute Fridays, but I’ve never contributed to a magazine before, in any form.  I figured to start things off, I would go ahead and introduce myself to you all. My name is Mary Hales, and I’ve been a flutist since I was in the fifth grade.  I earned my Bachelors degree in Flute Performance in 2017, from the University of Central Arkansas in my hometown of Conway, where I studied with Dr. Carolyn Brown.  Currently, I’m working towards my Masters in Performance at the University of Missouri with Prof. Alice K. Dade.  When I’m not practicing, I like to be writing, especially creatively and for my blog, drinking coffee or tea, and advocating for epilepsy awareness.  I was diagnosed in late 2015, and thankfully, with the help of medication, have been seizure free since then. One of the things I want to focus on in this column is being a graduate student, getting on your feet as an entrepreneur, and most importantly, how those things can go hand-in-hand.  I look forward to hearing from you all as I go; I anticipate this being a fun journey for all of us!  So let’s dive right in to my first column, talking about a professional social media presence. Social media has become ubiquitous in modern society; everywhere we go, everyone around us is on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, and probably other platforms that I don’t know enough about to use.  Screen time is often derided as unproductive and wasteful; however, as professionals, instantaneous connection around the globe can be incredibly useful to what we do.  Networking is vital to any venture in life, be it music or data processing.  We all need connections with experience in our respective fields to help us along our paths.  In the modern age, social media can be a great way to connect with others—including, but not limited to, potential colleagues, teachers, employers, and/or clients.  Below, I’ll discuss a few things I’ve tried or seen on social media that make for good networking practices. Reach out to people! If you scroll past a post where someone is asking for advice, don’t just keep going! You’re never going to make connections if you just keep scrolling.  If you feel comfortable chipping in, add your two cents.  At least scroll through the comments; you might find something you agree with and can “like”.  I can speak from experience when I say this is a really helpful thing to do.  As a thank-you to my Instagram following when I reached 500 followers, I recorded a Bach invention with a flutist I’ve never even met, just because I sent her a message.  Turns, out, she also has a pretty awesome feed! (Side note: go check out Jolene Madewell’s account @joleneflute on Instagram for more!) In that same vein…collaborate with others. You’re all on social media for at least one of the same reasons – you want to share your love of music, the flute, and whatever else you attach to it.  If you’re like me and...

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The Importance of Performing Arts Health in Music Education. by Francesca Leo

Posted by on Jun 5, 2018 in Featured, Health & Wellness, Issues, June 2018, Lifestyle | 0 comments

The Importance of Performing Arts Health in Music Education. by Francesca Leo

Results from a 2009 study conducted by Ackermann, Kenny and Fortune revealed that 95% of highly skilled flute students suffered performance-related musculoskeletal disorders[1].  When I was sixteen years old, I was diagnosed with my first performance-related injury.  After experiencing severe pain when I played my flute, I scheduled a doctor’s appointment and was diagnosed with tendonitis in both forearms.  With the doctor’s limited knowledge of performance-related injury in musicians, the only advice I was given was to take a significant amount of time off of playing.  Since the majority of my extra-curricular activities involved playing my flute, I chose to ignore the advice and continued to play through my pain, hoping it would disappear on its own.  There were zero resources available to me about maintaining good musculoskeletal health, so I assumed the pain I was experiencing was normal and part of being a musician. As I entered college as a music performance major, I experienced a stressful transitional period in my life, increased my amount of practicing, and my pain worsened exponentially.  I continued to practice through my pain and still had limited access to resources about performance-based injury.  I was also partially to blame for my lack of resources; I failed to tell anybody about this pain in fear that it would be seen as a weakness. That would not have been the case, since the community of musicians I worked with during my undergraduate degree was an extremely supportive group of people.  However, it is easy as a young musician to transform your insecurities into competition against others. My pain reached its worst the summer of my junior year, when I was attending an international summer festival and beginning to prepare for graduate school auditions.  I could barely play my flute for ten minutes without experiencing excruciating pain in my forearms and shoulders.  At that moment, I received a major wake-up call.  I could continue to ignore the warning signs my body was shouting at me and risk ending my career at age 21, or I could finally begin to open up about my pain and seek help.  I chose the latter and was soon diagnosed with both shoulder and forearm tendonitis.  When my doctor mentioned the possibility of needing neck surgery if my condition worsened, I knew I had to put my health above everything else.  I began to see a physical therapist twice a week, took Alexander Technique lessons, started prioritizing exercise, and began seeing a massage therapist.  While all of these methods were helping, it became much too expensive and time consuming to continue this rigorous treatment cycle as a full-time student.  I decided to conduct my own research and was awarded a grant to study performance-based injury in collegiate music students. My primary motivation in applying for this grant was to provide access for students to injury treatment centers in their area and information about time and cost-efficient prevention methods.  Through my research, I gained knowledge about my own injuries and also learned that I was not alone.  Based on the results of a survey I conducted, over 80% of students at my institution were experiencing performance-based pain to the point that it affected their ability to play their instrument at the level to which they were accustomed.  Additionally, over 50% of...

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3 Days of Flute in NYC. by Barbara Siesel

Posted by on Jun 5, 2018 in Articles, Blog, Essays, Featured, Issues, June 2018, Lifestyle | 0 comments

3 Days of Flute in NYC.  by Barbara Siesel

As a lifelong New Yorker I tend to take all the amazing cultural offerings here for granted, you know, feeling that I can always attend a concert, go to the museum, find something interesting… so I often don’t go! Several weekends ago I found myself free, in town and thought – I really want to attend some concerts.   I wondered if there were flute concerts to hear and see- maybe I could get inspired, hear a new piece and learn something new.  Happily there were a number of events that fit the bill! Here’s what I experienced over 3 days. Get Inspired On Saturday, Symphony Space (one of our many interesting venues, reclaimed from an old movie theater on the Upper West Side of Manhattan) was holding one of their Wall-to –Wall days of performances of a significant composer. This year was Wall-to-Wall Bernstein.  I couldn’t wait to hear one of my favorite composers played by many of the cities finest musicians. The concert was stretching a good 11 hours so I planned to attend the afternoon segments that focused on Bernstein’s classical music. I was especially interested in hearing a performance of Bernstein’s Halil: Nocturne (1981) played by Mindy Kaufman who is the amazing Piccolo player with the NY Philharmonic. The version that was played is the 1987 version for flute, piano and percussion and the marvelous players in addition to Mindy were Eric Huebner (pianist with the NY Phil), Daniel Druckman (NY Phil) Pablo Rieppi (NYC Ballet Orchestra) and Sae Hashimoto all on percussion.   Here is what Leonard Bernstein says about Halil in the score: “This work is dedicated ‘To the spirit of Yadin and to his fallen brothers… Ḥalil (the Hebrew word for ‘flute’) is formally unlike any other work I have written, but is like much of my music in its struggle between tonal and non-tonal forces. In this case, I sense that struggle as involving wars and the threat of wars, the overwhelming desire to live, and the consolations of art, love and the hope for peace. It is a kind of night-music, which, from its opening 12-tone row to its ambiguously diatonic final cadence, is an ongoing conflict of nocturnal images: wish-dreams, nightmares, repose, sleeplessness, night-terrors and sleep itself, Death’s twin brother. I never knew Yadin Tannenbaum, but I know his spirit.’” Mindy’s flute playing was beautiful, exacting in all facets, rhythm, pitch, sound and emotion, and the other players were equally excellent, I loved hearing all those percussion sounds with flute, it’s such a great combination. The concert was inspiring in several ways, reminding me of how interesting it is as a flutist to play with percussion, and to think about precision as a player in all its aspects. And, given the difficult times we’re living in to remember how music can represent our struggles and conflicts in a way that is non-threatening to those who disagree or oppose us, can instead be healing and consoling and remind us of our shared humanity.  So Saturday was goood!!! Hear New Pieces (and more) On Sunday my friend Stephen Clark was in town from London to perform a short recital as one of the winners of the Alexander & Buono International Flute Competition. They have a flute competition once every 3 years and give...

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Jamie Baum: Album Review

Posted by on Jun 5, 2018 in CD Reviews, Featured, Issues, June 2018, Reviews | 2 comments

Jamie Baum: Album Review

Bridges- Jamie Baum Septet+   Jazz flutist, composer and leader Jamie Baum has released her new CD Bridges.  Bridges became the focus of her 2014 Guggenheim Fellowship application (and subsequent award) while Jamie was researching the connections between Jewish music (her earliest influences) and Arabic, Middle Eastern and South Asian music. As Jamie says “this music represents a bridge highlighting the similarities found in diverse religious musical traditions that connects us… Bridges feels more compelling and relevant today then I could have anticipated.”   I’m so excited by the concept and realization of these ideas and Baum really makes a compelling, creative and musical case for these connections.   Her Septet+ features these virtuosic musicians from diverse backgrounds: Amir Saffar, trumpet and voice, Sam Sadigursky, alto sax, bass clarinet, Chris Komer, french horn, Brad Shepik, guitar, John Escreet, piano, Zack Lober, bass, singing bowl, Jeff Hirshfield, drums and special guests, Jamey Haddad, percussion and Navin Chettri, percussion, voice, trumpets. Here are the tracks: From the Well- based on a scale common to Maqam, Jewish and South Asian music. Song Without Words (for S. James Baum) written for the passing of Jamie’s father and based on Kol Nidre which is the ancient melody played at the beginning of Yom Kippur (the Jewish day of atonement). There Are No Words- expressing how there are no words in the face of loss. Honoring Nepal: The Shiva Suite – commissioned by the Rubin Museum of Himalayan Art in NYC, and written to highlight and pay tribute to the 2015 earthquake in Nepal. Using Shiva the Hindu deity who is the “destroyer of evil and the transformer” as the inspiration for the suite. Part 1 – The Earthquake Part 2 -  Renewal Part 3 – Contemplation Joyful Lament, based on a melody by Nusrat Fateh Ali Kahn Mantra, based on Mahamrityunjaya Mantra, sung for healing, rejuvenation and nurturance. Ucross Me- about crossing boundaries. As you read and listen to the track titles you begin to understand the thoughts, story and hope that Baum is telling us through these complex compositions, which combine improvisatory jazz, Hindu, Arabic, Jewish, Classical and Minimalist forms into a beautiful whole! Throughout the album the playing is stellar, the ensemble is perfect and each artist contributes exquisitely to the musical message of the album. Produced by Jamie Baum and Richie Beirach – Lynnjam Music www.JamieBaum.com   --Barbara...

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Alice K. Dade: Album Review

Posted by on Jun 5, 2018 in CD Reviews, Featured, Issues, June 2018, Reviews | 0 comments

Alice K. Dade: Album Review

Alice K. Dade is the Assistant Professor of Flute at the University of Missouri, and is on the Artist Faculty of Flutes by the Sea, MOZAIC Festival and the PRIZM International Chamber Festival.   Living Music / Alice K. Dade This is Alice K. Dade's first solo album, and it is a bold move into contemporary classical chamber music.  The selection of new works is diverse, united by Dade’s precise and animated playing.  Recorded at Skywalker Studios, the nuances of the pieces can be heard as she delicately brings out the pastoral feeling generated through the uplifting sounds of “Air”, String Quartet Version, by Aaron Kernis and “Skipping Stones” by Michael Fine.  Dade’s flute soars elegantly, with impeccable intonation and her liquid, brilliant sound.  She is accompanied by a first-class cast which includes violinists Scott Yoo and Erik Arvinder; violist Maurycy Banaszek, cellist Jonah Kim, and double bassist Susan Cahill. The E Sonata for flute and keyboard in E minor Op. 40 by Noam Elkies, is reminiscent of Bach’s E Minor Sonata for flute and piano.  It begins with a contemplative movement featuring some unexpected high register flourishes, rising and falling as the accompanying piano, with the composer at the keyboard,  he seems to keep the mood in the earthly realm, evocative of the title “Eheu,” or “alas,” possibly as in “Alas, the fleeting years slip by” a quotation from Horace. But you don’t need to know that to feel the sense of urgency communicated by the almost burning interjections by Dade, played with decisive authority.  The second, two-minute nineteen second movement of the sonata,  “Mediation” brings the mood back up for Air for a moment before changing course halfway through via some abrupt “thoughts” that are symbolized by a short, interjections from Dade, then solo piano briefly seeming to tumble back to Earth.  The final movement, “Evoe!” is jazzy and fun, with a piano underlay and playful, dancing flute playing. Dade and Elkies play with expressive grace and power. Jennifer Margaret Barker’s impressive, 'Na Tri Peathraichean’ means 'The Three Sisters... of Glencoe,' in Scottish Gaelic, and each piece is meant to evoke one of the three mountains in the title.  Dade captures perfectly the feeling of wild mountain places,  her runs and escalating lines, performed with precision and passion as if they were waterfalls or running stags.  Pianist, John Novacek, compliments Dade beautifully throughout the work.   The second moment, commences with Dade mirroring a flowing river.  Piano and flute sinuously entwine, providing a vivid landscape of colors and textures.  The third movement begins with the majestic introduction by Novacek.  Dade and Novacek are both regal and sensitive, beautifully capturing Baker’s richly evocative music. Dan Coleman’s “Pavanes and Symmetries,” was arranged for flute and piano by Benjamin Loeb.  This piece allows Dade and Novacek to weave a their innate sensibilities with warm lyricism,  and to showcase their immaculate virtuosity. In all, this is a great collection of diverse pieces united by Alice K. Dade’s confident performances.  She presents an splendid cornucopia sampling of American composers, and is accompanied by a deluxe  roster of impressive musicians. --Viviana Guzman...

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Amy Porter: Album Review

Posted by on Jun 5, 2018 in CD Reviews, Featured, Issues, June 2018, Reviews | 0 comments

Amy Porter: Album Review

Michael Daugherty / Trail of Tears featuring Amy Porter (NAXOS) This ambitious album featuring the works of Michael Daugherty with flutist, Amy Porter, percussionist, Dame Evelyn Glennie and tuba player, Carol Jantsch, with the Albany Symphony and conducted by David Alan Miller, is said to be meant to explore “the relationships between machines, humanity and nature.” The album starts off with Amy Porter using her signature velvet sound, on the first track, “Trail of Tears.” Porter’s flute does seem to cry mournfully at certain points in the first movement, “where the wind blew free,” in defiance or defeat in contrast to the dramatic thundering of percussion by the symphony, but also on occasion to float or tiptoe among the other instruments as if seeking a way out, appropriate to the title, and joining in triumph with them before striking out again alone.  Interludes of simple, soothing solo flute, played with a sultry tone, give way to more urgent and insistent passages, then alternating with bursts of doom-sounding from the horns and strings; the flute seeming to join with the symphony only to fall back to opposition.  Porter wails and soars with her impeccable sonority and brilliance. The second movement of the piece, “incantation,” is given a spiritual and emotional life evocative of a Native American incantation, at times sorrowful or mysterious, at times joyous. Porter creates these images deftly with her evocative playing and exquisite sound. The final movement, “sun dance” features rapid-fire playing from Porter matched to the racing tempo, and again, veers off with the piece in different emotional directions, slowing down only to come roaring back full speed.  Amy Porter’s outstanding musicianship weaves a luminous trail of power, magnificence and flair. Porter delivers a commanding showcase of her talents in bringing "Trail of Fears" to life.  As to the works for tuba and percussion, we leave you to explore them as a great bonus when you check out this breathtaking album. --Viviana Guzman...

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The Virtuosic Flutist: Book Review

Posted by on Jun 5, 2018 in Book Reviews, Book Reviews, Featured, Issues, June 2018, Reviews | 1 comment

The Virtuosic Flutist: Book Review

The Virtuosic Flutist is a new collection of studies keyed to the mechanics of playing the flute and the nuances of improving one's playing.  The exercises are intended to be a manual for any aspiring flutist looking to hone his or her techniques, or to consider adopting techniques through instruction.   Nina Assimakopoulos has done a fantastic job of compiling her top exercises, which include studies in Breathing, Intonation, Vibrato, Tone Color, and Grounding, as well as Repertoire Excerpts.  In the beginning of the book, Assimakopoulos clearly defines each category and gives a thorough description on what to look out for, a system of notation using triangles to point out  "focal points" for the areas being taught, and how to achieve the goals of learning those areas. There are illustrations of the various parts of our bodies such as the nasopharnyx and esophagus, that we often don't think about as being involved when we are playing.  By explaining in detail how vibrato is created, for example, we get a better understanding of how to play using it.   In Section II, the groundwork from Section I is put to use in exercises set forth on the staff, and the reader can dive in and put the advice to practice using the notated examples for breathing or intonation.  In Section III, Assimakopoulos includes excerpts of some favorite, well-known pieces to put into practice the knowledge gained from the beginning of the book.  Several of the piece excerpts are written out in various keys in order to fully implement Assimakopoulos’ suggested exercises in tone, grounding, and tone color.  Having these pieces such as Prelude to Afternoon of a Faun included, allows the flutist who knows the piece to concentrate on utilizing the new techniques, (assisted by the notation system explained in the beginning), and bringing new shadings to them and to then be able to transfer that skill elsewhere.   The Virtuosic Flutist is a complete manual for any flutist who wants to take his or her playing to the next level. Nina Assimakopoulos has designed a meticulous compilation of fabulous and helpful exercises, which will definitely make a difference and transform you into a Virtuosic Flutist.   The book can be purchased at Flute World, Flutistry Boston, Flute Pro Shop, and in hard copy and digitally at http://www.ninaassimakopoulos.info/site/VirtuosicFlutist.html Nina will be signing copies at NFA this summer! --Viviana Guzman  ...

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Christina Jennings: Juggling Flute and Family

Posted by on May 2, 2018 in Featured, Interviews, Issues, May 2018 | 0 comments

Christina Jennings: Juggling Flute and Family

Flutist Christina Jennings enjoys a musical career made up of diverse performing and recording, collaborations, and work guiding young musicians. In great demand as a teacher, Ms. Jennings is the director of the Panoramic Flutist and on faculty at CU Boulder and Greenwood Music Camp. What do you like best about teaching?   Guiding young musicians is an extraordinary privilege that fills me with knowledge, humility, and inspiration everyday. Seeing a young freshman through to graduation will be the ultimate thrill of my life. Everything I am and hope to be is encapsulated in the transaction of teaching and I am wildly delighted to call this my job.   What does your schedule look like for the next 6 months?   We have another stellar season of Panoramic Flutist including a Middle and High School day with Viviana Guzman, then off to Greenwood Music Camp- a 5-week chamber music camp for high school students. Greenwood is the highlight of my families' year as we all live in community with like-minded musicians. The luxury of collectively pursuing  (and eating, breathing, and sleeping) chamber music for this intense period is transformative to all. I was a student at Greenwood in the 1980s and that experience shaped who I am in so many meaningful ways. My husband (viola faculty)  and twin boys love being at Greenwood! I will also teach at ARIA- a great masterclass experience for students of all ages. Then I head to Avaloch Farms, an artist retreat in New Hampshire, where I will record a CD with pianist Susan Ellinger- Prokofiev Sonata, Messiaen, Schubert, and lots of other beautiful, heartfelt music. The Fall semester at CU will be busy- I will welcome five new students to the studio. I have Mozart and Griffes Concertos in the Fall; a recital dedicated to the centennial anniversary of George Rochberg, and a New York City trip in November that will include a CU sponsored evening at Carnegie Hall and the recording of another album of Laura Schwendinger including her Aurora for flute and piano that was the Young Artist commission from the NFA last summer.  What are your goals personally?  What are you goals professionally?   I recently had the incredible opportunity to work with Dana Fonteneau, the person behind The Wholehearted Musician. Here she is in her own words: "Dana Fonteneau draws on her diverse background in music, business, finance, and psychology to help her clients attain greater personal and career success. She is part performance coach, management consultant, financial advisor, and therapist. Equally comfortable in the board room and the concert hall, Dana helps individuals and small businesses succeed. Her international practice is centered in the arts where she works with top soloists, chamber ensembles, orchestral musicians, actors, dancers, and educators, as well as with leading administrators, board members, and managers throughout the music industry.” These sessions I had with Dana were astonishingly informative to me in creating next steps and goals both personally and professionally. Her magic lies in helping artists get clear on pursuing goals and activities that fulfill your highest purpose- activities that light you up, projects that you get lost in- that sort of thing. The conversations and homework she assigned were illuminating and have showed me a few common themes going forward. Some of these include...

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