Issues

Erica Peel: Artist Interview

Posted by on Oct 1, 2017 in Featured, Interviews, Issues, October 2017 | 1 comment

Erica Peel: Artist Interview

A versatile flutist and piccoloist, Erica Peel enjoys an exciting career as an orchestral player, chamber musician, soloist, composer and teacher.  Piccoloist of the Philadelphia Orchestra, she is praised for her “effortless” & “authentic” performances.  Erica has held positions with the Honolulu Symphony, Omaha Symphony, San Diego Symphony, and has been seen in performances with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Chicago Symphony and Houston Symphony. What was the process to audition for the Philadelphia Orchestra? The audition process was fairly typical for an orchestral position.  There was a preliminary round, where all applicants played for about 5 mins behind a screen.  Although I'm not sure exactly how many candidates there were, my guess is around 100.  This round lasted over 2 days, I believe, and they narrowed it down to about 10-15 candidates for a semi-final round.  This round was still screened, and each person played for around 20 mins.  The committee then narrowed the pool further to only 3 applicants. We each played a final round, which was unscreened, and had a concerto (w/pianist) and solo (chosen by the candidate) component.  After the final round, two of us were chosen to do 2 trial weeks with the orchestra, which means we would rehearse and perform with the orchestra during 2 weeks of their season.  This is also pretty common, especially for a solo instrument like the piccolo.  They want to hear how you fit in with the sound of the orchestra, feel what the chemistry is like in the section, and see how you respond to the music director - all crucial for long term happiness in an ensemble!  At the end of my second trial week (but before I played my last concert of the week), they called me in to the green room, and the entire committee, including Yannick, was there to congratulate me. How did you feel? During the audition, I felt more relaxed than normal.  I had a job that I adored in San Diego, and had low expectations for this particular audition... I mean, it's THE Philadelphia Orchestra!!  I didn't think I was worthy, but it's one of those auditions that you take no matter what.  The farther I advanced, the more shocked I was.  I mostly tried to keep reminding myself how lucky I was to play in that hall "as a soloist" THREE times (in each round), and really attempted to enjoy each moment I was there. During the trial weeks, I felt much more pressure, as I was hyper aware that people were judging me - not maliciously, of course, but it's what they are supposed to do!  That being said, the musicians were very warm and welcoming, which was a relief.  Those "pinch me" moments were plentiful, and again, I just tried to soak it the experience, fully expecting that this would be the (potentially only) chance of a lifetime to play with the Philadelphia Orchestra.  The musicians were magnificent... I had never felt a unity in musicianship like that before.  Everyone breathed and moved together, and gave 150% every time.  I almost cried during every rehearsal and performance, just overwhelmed with what I was hearing/feeling and grateful to be a part of it, even if just for a couple of weeks. "When they told me I got the job, I definitely cried." When they told me I got the job, I...

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Fluting for a Cause: Viviana Guzman and Fluterscooter

Posted by on Oct 1, 2017 in Articles, Entrepreneurship, Featured, Issues, October 2017 | 0 comments

Fluting for a Cause: Viviana Guzman and Fluterscooter

What inspired you to start “Fluting for a Cause?"   Fluter:  I actually did my new album without a cause in mind, at first.  It was inspired by deer with the title track named "Deer Magic."  But then when Hurricane Irma hit the Florida Keys, I was very worried about the key deer, an endangered species of deer with their home in Big Pine Key.  I, like many others who have visited the Keys and gotten to know the key deer, were worried if they would survive the storm.  They did!  But they need resources like fresh water (the only water there is salt, which is unsafe for them to drink), veterinary costs, and food.  That is why I am donating profits from my track "Deer Magic" to the Save Our Key Deer Foundation. Viviana:  After my Whale Bumps Paddle Boarder went viral, I attended the American Cetacean Society’s Convention as I wanted to understand what was my whale’s message to me. At the convention I learned of the plight of the Vaquita Porpoise. There are under 30 left on the planet! They are the cutest little dolphins. They get caught in the gill nets that are used in the Sea of Cortez, where they live. I became determined that I was going to become their voice and help raise money and awareness for them. I decided to record a Meditation / New Age album, as I wanted to offer an album that would be easy to sell, music that would appeal to everyone.   Describe your Cause?   Fluter:  To advocate on behalf of the Florida Key Deer population to assure they receive ethical treatment and protection and to reduce human-caused illness, injury and death events. The Florida Key Deer deserve to receive timely and appropriate medical treatment to alleviate pain and suffering. Now, especially, because of the impact of Hurricane Irma, more resources and help are needed. Viviana:  At the time of recording the CD, there were under 30 Vaquitas left on the planet. Frankly, this is an embarrassing reflection on the human race. The Vaquitas get trapped in the fishing gill nets while fishermen fish for Totoaba, another endangered species, highly sought after in Asia for their swim bladder. As a last attempt to save these beautiful creatures, the Mexican Government has banned the use of gill nets. Leonardo DiCaprio stepped up and met with Mexican Billionaire, Carlos Slim to establish efforts to save the Vaquitas. The connection between Mexican President, Peña Nieto and DiCaprio started in May 2017 with a tweet, when the actor and environmentalist urged his followers to back a World Wildlife Fund campaign petitioning Mexico’s president to “take strong action now” to save the vaquita. The Mexican president answered, “I welcome @LeoDiCaprio and @World_Wildlife's concern regarding the Vaquita Marina.” The latest plan according to the Smithsonian’s report on July 2017, is to use navy trained dolphins to herd the Vaquitas safety to a marine sanctuary near San Felipe, Mexico later this year.   Where did this interest begin?   Fluter:  Deer have been an important animal guide for me the past couple years, and I am so grateful for these magical animals.  The gentleness, grace, and innocence of the deer are qualities I embody because of the presence of deer in my life.  When I...

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Thoughts on Making Performance Recordings by Francesca Arnone

Posted by on Oct 1, 2017 in Articles, Featured, Issues, October 2017 | 0 comments

Thoughts on Making Performance Recordings by Francesca Arnone

Francesca Arnone is an active Florida flute and piccolo soloist, chamber and orchestral musician, and educator. She’s been a concerto soloist on flute, alto flute, and piccolo, on repertoire ranging from Bach to Chen Yi. Recordings on MSR and PARMA. See www.francescaarnone.com Recognizing we are all works in progress, I am acutely aware of how I learn through teaching, doing, being. I don't believe we're ever "done," at a point of having reached the ultimate stage where there's nothing that could be different or better or improved. With that in mind, how do we record ourselves without losing our minds? Will it ever be good enough to actually record?! Recording is inherently a vehicle for evaluating, right? It provides a platform to "get things just right" since it will be preserved for posterity . . . or at least until someone  might find it and take a listen (or look). When we perform, we're in the moment, we send it out there, and it's gone forever (unless someone records it!). How do we make these two presentations more related? Making recordings can be a daunting task - there's the nervousness akin to performing while faced with the glow of the red light . . . this can be even more challenging than an actual performance because there's no human interaction. Sometimes, though, knowing we can just do another take will be the confidence-boost to just go for it! And then there's the joy in knowing we have something usable down already, anyway - so let's just see what we really *could* do! To me, knowing a recording is a snapshot of where we, our ideas, our interpretation, our development/progress - all are right here, right now - promotes growth. It helps me understand this is a learning opportunity. The trick is to do it often enough so we get used to the process and all the "stuff" it might dig up. If we're hoping our  "winning takes" will magically happen when pressing record we are setting ourselves for a really unpleasant, unproductive experience. So we have different uses for recordings (personal, audition, documenting our progress, launching a project, connecting with others, etc.) but no matter what, we will learn from this experience! Here are a few ideas from some mistakes I have made and also experienced - to help us all keep growing. I'm targeting this list for audition submissions, by the way: Play a test recording (or more!) in your practice room, for people you don't know, for people you do know, for your dog/cat/hamster. Jot down your observations of how it went and how you felt. Then listen to the recording, and re-evaluate your performance. Do the two match, or are your "while playing" observations excessively critical and overtake the good stuff you're actually delivering? This is important information - and especially influential (positive or negative!) when you start recording. [How many times have people listened to tracks they had mentally rejected and stopped, only to discover they were their favorite takes when reviewing?] Trying this early test run session will also let you know - very clearly - what areas of your rep need more attention. They'll be the ones stressing you out while you perform! If at all possible and your submission deadline permits, perform whatever you are recording...

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NEW COLUMN: Dr. G’s Flute Horoscopes. by Rachel Taylor Geier

Posted by on Oct 1, 2017 in Blog, Dr. G's Flute Horoscopes, Featured, Issues, October 2017 | 0 comments

NEW COLUMN:  Dr. G’s Flute Horoscopes. by Rachel Taylor Geier

The big news for everybody this month is that Jupiter, planet of expansion, growth, abundance, and learning, is entering the sign of Scorpio on October 10th. This will mean different things for each sign depending on which astrological house Jupiter lands in. With the Sun also moving into Scorpio on October 22nd, there will be an added spotlight on your Jupiter placement. Something in your flute playing is about to blow up (in a good way!). The Jupiter transit will last a little over a year. You may not see abundance right away, however October marks the beginning of major growth and change in your flute life. The seeds are literally being sown in October for something new and amazing to happen in the future months. Get ready! Libra (September 23-October 22). Happy Birthday Libra!!! For the first 3 weeks of the month, the Sun will be in your sign in the 1st house of visibility and who you are in the world. You are most likely playing up a storm, hopping from performance to performance, juggling impressive solos in your band or orchestra ensembles with stunning solo and chamber recital performances that put you smack dab in the middle of the spotlight. You are the queen bee for the first 3 weeks of October! Your Jupiter is landing in the 2nd house of income on October 10th (and we are all jealous). This is a great time for you to expand your income by taking on new money-making endeavors. Jupiter may be encouraging you to learn new skills that will increase your cashflow over the next year (maybe you are learning a new instrument to increase your student base). As Venus and Mars are aligned in your 12th house of shadows and secrets for the first two weeks of the month, you may be feeling quite passionate about a project that you are working on behind the scenes. When Venus and Mars move into your 1st house on October 22nd, at the same time that the sun is shining a light on the Jupiter hanging out in your 2nd house of income, you are ready to share the money-making project you have been working on in secret with the world. Have you been working on a new CD recording that is set to launch on or around the end of October? Or maybe you are writing a book that is set to release at the end of the month. Whatever it is, you are very excited and ready to share your flute playing ideas with the world. Full Moon - October 5th in Aries in your 7th house of relationships. A creative relationship might be ending behind the scenes. Perhaps your accompanist is moving or you no longer have time to perform with a particular group. New Moon - October 19th in Libra in your 1st house, opposing Uranus. You want to break out of a rut and promote something new! You are reinventing your own definition of what it means to be a “flute player.” Scorpio (October 23-November 21).   Are you spending countless hours in the practice room these days? You may also be typing away at your computer working on an article or a book until the wee hours of the morning. This is because...

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Get to Know Flute New Music Consortium! By Nicole Riner

Posted by on Oct 1, 2017 in Entrepreneurship, Featured, Issues, October 2017 | 0 comments

Get to Know Flute New Music Consortium!  By Nicole Riner

The Flute New Music Consortium is the shared mission of promoting new music for the flute by commissioning works, organizing simultaneous premieres, and encouraging repeat performances. FNMC strives to involve as many people as possible in each project, and our performers and composers come from throughout the United States and the world. We always have two concurrent projects in any given year: a consortium commission (spanning over multiple years), and our annual composition competition. Our first commissioning project in 2015 was for solo flute, and it featured Pulitzer Prize winning composer, Zhou Long. Our current commissioning project is a work for flute and piano by Carter Pann, which will be premiered simultaneously by members across the country the weekend of March 2-4, 2018. The piece will also be featured in our Carter Pann residency at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, where flute professor Therese Wacker will premiere it with Carter at the piano. Our composition competition, which is coordinated by Vice President Elizabeth Robinson, encompasses four ensemble-specific categories, and therefore allows for four winners each year. All members of every level vote for a winner in each category when it has been narrowed down to finalists by outside judges. So, members play a large role in the selection of the winning pieces, and then they receive a complimentary copy of each winning score. Members can either join at the commissioning level ($225+) or at the performing level ($20+). All members have full voting rights. We also have a collegiate membership of $10+ for undergraduates who are studying with a current member at the performing or commissioning level. So, as a performing member or collegiate member, you’re getting a chance to help pick winners in the competition and you receive four pieces of great music; you can hardly ever purchase one piece of music for $20 in any other circumstance! We have added a new event this year called the Flute Artist Competition. Contestants will submit entries to the recorded round by November 15, 2017, 11:59pm CST for consideration. Required music for the recorded round is Zhou Long’s Confluence (our first commissioned work) and any piece with piano. Up to four finalists will be invited to the final round of the competition, which will take place at Carter Pann’s Residency at IUP on March 3. The final round repertoire will also feature the premiere of a newly commissioned work for flute and recorded sound by a former FNMC winning composer, Bekah Simms.  A cash prize of $250 will be awarded to the winner. This competition is open to FNMC members of all ages. We are continually striving to contribute to the development of the modern flute literature while supporting our composers and flutists and creating a truly collaborative spirit between our two communities. Our members perform FNMC pieces again and again, offering composers the chance to have their works performed many times every year. And we are active in helping our performers advertise their performances through social media, our website, and blog. We even organize performances (for flute festivals and academic music conferences) to offer members more opportunities to play our composers’ pieces. We also publish regular member spotlights and composer spotlights on our blog and have a series of interviews with our composers on You Tube. And we all come together each year at...

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Jean-Louis Beaumadier: Album Review

Posted by on Oct 1, 2017 in CD Reviews, Featured, Issues, October 2017, Reviews | 0 comments

Jean-Louis Beaumadier: Album Review

If you wake up in a sad mood, I suggest you put on Jean-Louis Beaumadier’s new CD, Sweet Dream,a joyous album which as Jean Louis says, “demonstrates the lighter side of the piccolo’s character.” The album is part of Beaumadier’s ongoing piccolo repertoire project, and Sweet Dreams is World Piccolo, volume 3. The collection includes works by these composers from throughout the world: Camarguo Guarnieri, Mike Mower, Jean Michel Damase, Gordon Jacob, Veronique Poltz, Flint Juventino Beppe, William Bardwell, Eugene Magalif, Raymond Gulot, and Malik Mezzadri. Beaumadier is a brilliant player, who has brought piccolo playing to a new level of attention and artistry through his many recordings and commissioning of new work. He plays with a beautiful sound, perfect pitch and crystal clear rhythm, always with a joyous infectious energy!! He has some wonderful guest players on the CD including Carla Rees and Gergely Itzes on Alto flute, Magik Malik on flute/ voice, Vincent Beer Demander on Mandoline, Peter Verhoyen on piccolo, Mathier Schaefer on xylophone and Jordi Torrent on piano. They are all expert players who add to the virtuosity of the album. For example, I loved Peter Verhoyen in the humorous piccolo duet with piano by Eugene Magalif and Jordi Torrent’s incredible ensemble playing throughout the album. The final work on the album is Malik Mezzadri’s, Naomi which shows a different side to the piccolo, utilizing flute and flute singing, done expertly by Magik Malik. It’s an abstract atonal work that reminds us that the piccolo had great versatility and that Beaumadier is a master of it all!! You can purchase the album on his website. --Barbara...

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Suzanne Teng: Album Review

Posted by on Oct 1, 2017 in CD Reviews, Featured, Issues, October 2017, Reviews | 0 comments

Suzanne Teng: Album Review

Right now, we all need more meditation, healing, and peace, and Suzanne Teng/Mystic Journey's new album, "Kingdom of Mountains," provides music that evokes all of those elements.   I have always been a fan of Teng's music, as she is a master of countless world flutes, and "Kingdom of Mountains" is an excellent followup to her last album, "Mystic Journey."  Mystic Journey is now the name of the collective of musicians including Teng, her husband and co-writer, Gilbert Levy (world strings, percussions, synths), Dann M. Torres (guitar, oud, electric sitar), and Jon Ossman (bass and dilruba). "Kingdom of Mountains" is a blend of all styles of world music and flutes, and the ambient tracks behind the world instruments give it a feeling of peacefulness and thought.  This album has more rhythms, grooves, and instruments than her previous, which give the music more textures and layers.  Standout tracks are "Kingdom of Mountains," a 7 minute track, as I like the longer length in tracks, especially in meditation music.  "Delicate Rainbow Flower" is pure beauty, and the instruments blend together harmoniously.  When I close my eyes and listen to "Yunnan," I get transported to China.  Much of Teng's music can take you to different worlds if you just clear your thoughts and listen.  ...

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Sheet Music Review: Alison Young

Posted by on Oct 1, 2017 in Featured, Issues, October 2017, Reviews, Sheet Music Reviews | 0 comments

Sheet Music Review: Alison Young

A Little Tango in Her Blood is a new collection of songs for flute and piano arranged and edited by Alison Young.  As the title and its subtitle "Music from Argentina" suggest, this is a collection of tango songs including some of the lesser known (in the United States) pieces by tango giant Astor Piazzolla.  The hardcopy of the collection features Young's background in her introduction to the music and some of its modern-day composers, such as Horacio Salgan, and performers, such as pianist, Ana Chaves, in Argentina. Each song also has its own written introduction, which is helpful for getting into the mood--so that while the "Fuga y misterio" is an homage to Bach, a portion of the piece is lifted from Piazzolla's tango opera about a prostitute who is murdered. So the baroque inspiration of the piece only takes you so far in understanding it and playing it the way it should be played. Or, as she instructs on the music itself, "feral and fleet, in the Baroque style," not your typical musical direction.   Similarly, with "Don Augustin Bardi" by Salgan, Young suggests that the piece be played with "swagger"  (or "proud and vigorous"), in order to mirror the attitude of the titular bandoneon maestro, while the pianist is to mimic Bardi's playing on his instrument. Tangos are best understood as putting passion before refinement, as befitting the dance and music's legendary origin in the bordellos of Argentina, and the intros are thus useful to those who haven't had the chance to experience hearing the pieces played in Buenos Aires. The collection is a welcome addition to the flute repertoire, and also goes beyond the city-inspired pieces tango  is known for and includes Salgan's "Suite Argentina,"  which adds interest in its use of 3/4 within 6/8 time.  Piazzolla's "Chiqulin de Bachin" is a mournful, wistful piece (sort of a little brother to his masterful "Oblivion"), speaking to the regrets of Piazzolla at not having been able to help an orphan boy at the club he frequented.  Of course, there is nothing like hearing the pieces performed, and Young has recorded them, so you can hear her inspired interpretations of them. Alison Young has done a terrific job transcribing, arranging and editing these wonderful Argentinean tangos for flute and piano. Young’s “A Little Tango in her Blood” are a marvelous collection of tango pieces for flute and piano.  They are beautifully arranged and perfect to include in any flute recital;  a fantastic collection of Tango arrangements which appeal to audiences of all ages. Order your copy today! --Viviana Guzman...

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Audrey Emata: The Flute View Young Artist Competition Winner

Posted by on Sep 1, 2017 in Featured, Interviews, Issues, September 2017 | 0 comments

Audrey Emata: The Flute View Young Artist Competition Winner

Audrey Emata, 16, debuted as soloist with the Philadelphia Orchestra in Verizon Hall at age 12, and has also soloed with the Allentown, Lansdowne, Ambler, Warminster, Old York Road, Delaware County, and Juilliard Pre-College orchestras; she will be performing with the Kennett Symphony at Longwood Gardens in August 2017.  Audrey is a three-time winner of the New York Flute Club and Philadelphia Flute Society competitions, a two-time winner of the Mid-Atlantic Flute Fair competition, and has also won first prizes at the Pocono Flute Festival and the Asian-American Society International Competition, as well as a Yamaha Prize at the Julius Baker Master Classes in Danbury, CT.  She was a finalist at the 2016 NFA high school competition in San Diego, was featured on NPR’s From the Top (Show 299), and has performed with Sir James and Lady Jeanne Galway at the Kennedy Center. When did you start playing music?   I started taking piano lessons from my mom at the age of four.   Why did you choose the flute?   When I was six, my mom was accompanying for Rebecca Simon’s flute studio.  She had a full day of rehearsals, and she couldn't find me a babysitter.  I sat and listened to hours of flute music, and I was entranced.  My mom got me a cheap rental flute for the summer, and accompanied for Becki in exchange for lessons for me.   Who is your primary flute teacher?   After six years with Becki, I entered Juilliard PreCollege where I have studied with Brad Garner and Demarre McGill.   What grade are you in?  Where do you go to school?  What are your plans as a musician?   I am a rising eleventh grader at the University Scholars Program in the Pennsylvania Leadership Charter School.  After I graduate, I hope to attend conservatory.   What are your goals in the next year?    Next year, I want to learn a lot of repertoire.  I really want to learn Schubert’s Trockne Blumen variations, as well as the Bouriakov transcription of the Saint-Saens Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso.  I would also like to chop about ten inches off of my hair (it’s really long and heavy).   What do you like best about the flute?   I have always loved the sound of the flute.  In my opinion, it is the most beautiful and singing instrument.   Please give us 5 quirky fun facts about yourself (don’t think too much about this!)   I have a pug named Lorelei (and am thus always covered in pug hair). I love to eat but I wish every meal came in a bento box.  I hate when my food touches and mixes together. I love shoes.  The taller, the better (I’m very short). I am addicted to coffee and chocolate. I have a weeping cherry tree named Cherry that is exactly the same age as I am.  Clearly, I named the tree when I was quite young with great originality. Favorite YouTube Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gpXB4Q_AAXU&t=6s...

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The First Panama Flute Festival

Posted by on Sep 1, 2017 in Articles, Blog, Entrepreneurship, Essays, Featured, Issues, September 2017 | 0 comments

The First Panama Flute Festival

Dafne Guevara, Manuel Ruiz Acosta, and Valentin Martinez are the founders of APAFLUT (Asociación Panameña de Flautistas), the brand new and first flute association in Panama.   Fluterscooter was a Guest Artist of their first flute festival this summer in Panama City.  In this interview, she asks them about the festival, starting a flute association in Central America, and the flute and music scene in Panama. Explain a little about your background and how you founded APAFLUT:   Dafne: When I was studying in the USA, I saw a video of kids holding guns. The kids were barely 6 or 7 years old, and they were talking about killing people. These kids were reflecting all the hate that the older people had against society, and it was reflecting how hate can be passed down. I was thinking how sad it was for me, and that the government is not helping too much. They care about other things instead of education and culture. I used to live in one of these areas, so I know where these kids come from and what they see everyday. I said, we don’t need to wait for the government to do something; we have something beautiful. Let us use it, and take advantage of what we know, and all we know is to play the flute. We don’t have money. Manuel is also very enthusiastic, so we called and organized 40 kids and paid for pizza. One kid said he wanted to quit school, but saw what we were doing and your story, and now he will graduate and be someone. The kids said that we are their idols. After the first Panama flute “mini-festival,” we decided to create APA Flut. It’s been 113 years since anything happened with the flute here. We are the new generation. We need this! Without any money, I went back home and talked to Prof. Almarza, and he said he would support it. I went back to UNLV, and Dr. Grim was also on board. After that, I had a lot of opportunities to write projects for fellowships, and I won one fellowship through UNLV. I’d also write to friends of flute foundations and explain about the project, and I got a lot of support. Manuel: My sister is a lawyer, and she helped us with all the legal things we needed to create APA Flut in Panama. Was it difficult?   Manuel: It was VERY difficult, especially since we don’t have money, but luckily my sister helped. Valentin: We did 4 recitals to earn money to pay for the creation of the association. Dafne: We owe everything to the kids. Ever since we gave them the idea that we’re starting the flute association here, they knew we didn’t have money, but they said they still have flutes. From January until last week, the kids have been presenting recitals to get money. We sold tickets to the recitals, and advertised mostly on Facebook. Is this an ongoing flute association? What are your responsibilities until the next festival?   Dafne: Besides getting sponsors, it is to keep the kids motivated. We don’t want to give them something beautiful like this, but then have it go away. I want these kids to be someone and be inspired. So you’re really empowering these kids.   Dafne: Exactly....

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