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Master Classes and Lessons at the Gonjiam Festival. by Barbara Siesel

Posted by on Apr 2, 2018 in April 2018, Articles, Blog, Essays, Featured, Issues | 0 comments

Master Classes and Lessons at the Gonjiam Festival.  by Barbara Siesel

At the Gonjiam Music Festival, master teachers from around the world give open lessons to over 60 students attending the festival. I tried to attend as many of these classes as possible since I’d never heard any of these wonderful flutists and pedagogues teach before and I love learning from my colleagues. It was an enlightening experience as they all had so much to offer. Here are my summaries and favorite takeaways from the classes. Philipp Bernold, flutist and conductor: Philipp is the professor of chamber music and flute at the National Paris Conservatoire and a flute soloist and conductor extraordinaire! He beautifully conducted us in Nicole Chamberlain’s trio, Olympus for trio and orchestra, and played the Chaminade Concertino with verve and style between conducting each piece on the program- wow!!! Having had experience of his talent and artistry I wanted to attend the only class that he gave. He’s a marvelous teacher and worked on all aspects of flute with the students. The main points— Make sure you can play expressively without vibrato, thinking about your phrasing like speech, as some notes, like some words have special value. In a short time showing a shy student all manner of ways to play using the woods behind the window to create clear and colorful metaphors to improve her breathing strength, vibrato and phrasing. Bernold has a book-- La Technique d’Embouchure, 4th Edition, published by Billaudot, (available at Flute World) which are 218 exercises for mastery over our embouchure and creating a beautiful tone. He talked about the book in a discussion about using both your embouchure and your air, as he’s created exercises that allow one to develop both a good embouchure and a good, free blowing line with good support. I particularly loved his talk about free blowing the line, that a beginner blows free and loud and that, that impulse is the correct one, as the only energy we have is the air. We work with the diaphragm and the lips and the lips (a muscle) must be trained as well as the diaphragm muscle. My personal take away for my own playing and teaching: To sometimes blow loud and free, practice your scales loud and then spend time playing softer and working on your embouchure. I sometimes play too softly in order to stimulate my support and free my lips, but I found that the free blowing was quite helpful in opening up my sound. It’s another tool in my practice box!! Henrik Wiese Mozart Class: Henrik Wiese is the solo flutist in the Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks, Mariss Jansons chief conductor. A wonderful, exciting player! He also is involved with Mozart, Bach and Reinecke editions of both flute music and symphonic music and has written and made a study of Mozart Cadenza’s (among many other scholarly endeavors). In this class he spoke about Mozart flute music in general and also about Mozart Cadenza’s. The first part of the class was in English and it was illuminating! In answer to a question about Mozart articulation, Henrik doesn’t use traditional double tonguing (tktk) but suggests uses didle didle, so that the lines are more connected, like a singing. He also suggests using limited vibrato in Mozart, and to think about phrasing more, clearly in Mozart. My personal take-away:...

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Nicole Chamberlain: Composer Interview

Posted by on Apr 2, 2018 in April 2018, Featured, Interviews, Issues | 0 comments

Nicole Chamberlain: Composer Interview

Nicole Chamberlain (b. 1977) is a composer and flutist living in Atlanta, GA. In 2010, Nicole won "Audience Favorite" at the Atlanta Opera's first 24-Hour Opera Project for her opera "Scrub-A-Dub Raw" which resulted in the the Atlanta Opera's first ever commission of the children's opera, "Rabbit Tales", which received over 50 performances and kicked started her career as a composer. Nicole has also been commissioned by groups such as the Georgia Symphony Orchestra, Oklahoma Flute Society, Atlanta Flute Club, Flute Choir of Atlanta, Cuatro Puntos, Dahlia Flute Duo, Clibber the Jones Ensemble, and Hopewell Middle School Symphonic Band among others. She has had works performed at the 2013, 2015, 2016, and 2017 National Flute Association Conventions. She also won the 2013 Areon Flutes International Composition Competition, 2nd place in the 2014 and 2016 Flute New Music Consortium, and 1st place in the 2015 The Flute View's Composition Competition. Nicole received her Bachelors in Music Composition from University of Georgia where she studied with Dr. William Davis, Dr. Leonard Ball, Dr. Lewis Nielson and Dr. Roger Vogel and was selected for masterclasses with Charles Wuorinen and Joan Tower. Nicole, as a flutist, she has appeared with such groups as Georgia Symphony Orchestra, LaGrange Symphony, Gwinnett Ballet, duoATL, Mercury Season, Terminus Ensemble, Chamber Cartel, Perimeter Flutes, neoPhonia, Capitol City Opera, and Orchestra Atlanta. Nicole has participated in Masterclasses with Bradley Garner, Paul Edmund-Davies and Dr.Gordon Cole. Nicole's former flute teachers have included Donna Orbavich (Hong Kong Symphony), Lisa Wienhold (Alabama Symphony), Dr. Ronald Waln (University of Georgia) and Atlanta Symphony Orchestra's principal flutist, Christina Smith. Currently she balances her time composing, teaching students, performing, and avoiding graphic design work as much as possible. Nicole lives in Doraville with her husband, guitarist and composer Brian Chamberlain. For more information visit her website: www.nikkinotes.com How has your journey been as flutist and composer? I think like most musicians, its been a meandering course. I got two undergraduate degrees, a BFA in Digital Media and a BMus in Music Composition. The original plan was to create my own animated films and compose the soundtracks, and I did do some of that for a time after college for a children's multimedia before I realized it wasn't for me. I fell in love with working with live performers and teaching young students. Its easy to want a fixed path about how my career should have played out. But what did I know as a child!?! My tastes have changed and opportunities presented themselves to me that I could have never imagined possible. If I hadn't been open to them, I don't think I could be as happy as I am now. I make choices, and sometimes I re-evaluate my goals and make adjustments. I'm sure 18 year old Nicole would be surprised about how things have turned out, but I can't wait to see what changes may be ahead. Let's face it, its hard. If it was easy, everyone would be doing it. What do you like best about composing? There's many aspects to composing that I love. I love my alone time, and there's quite a bit of that as a composer. I love starting a piece and getting a plan figured out. I love problem solving transitions. However, my favorite part is getting...

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Henrik Wiese: Artist Interview

Posted by on Apr 2, 2018 in April 2018, Featured, Interviews, Issues | 0 comments

Henrik Wiese: Artist Interview

Flautist Henrik Wiese is descended from a merchant's family from the city of Hamburg, but he was born in Vienna in 1971. He received his musical education from Ingrid Koch-Dörnbrak and Paul Meisen. In addition he took his degree in Indo-European and general linguistics as well as in musicology at the Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich. Henrik Wiese won 1st prizes in several competitions, such as in the German National Music Competition (1995), and in the international competitions of the city of Kobe/Japan (1997), Markneukirchen/Germany (1998), Odense/Denmark (1998), and Munich/Germany (2000). As a substitute he gathered first experience in orchestra playing at Munich Philharmonic Orchestra and their former chief conductor Sergiu Celebidache. From 1995 to 2006 he was principal flautist at Bavarian State Opera in Munich (chief conductor Zubin Mehta). Since 2006 Henrik Wiese is principal flautist at Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra (chief conductor Mariss Jansons). Henrik Wiese is a synesthete, e. g. he hears colours. The rare gift of nature is an important source of musical inspiration to him. He played flute concertos not only with the Bavarian State Opera Orchestra and the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, but also with the Radio Symphony Orchestra Berlin, Radio Philharmonic Orchestra Hanover, Polish Chamber Philharmony, Prague Chamber Orchestra, and Munich Chamber Orchestra. His widespread musical activity is particularly established by chamber music recordings. Currently, Henrik Wiese is the Solo-Flautist of the Symphonie-Orchester des Bayerische Rundfunks and teaches at the Hochschule for Künste Bremen.   Can you give us 5 career highlights? This is a difficult question to answer. I have experienced so many highlights of different types. Winning at the German National Music Competition in 1995 and Munich International Music Competition (ARD) in 2000 was an honour I didn’t expect. Musically I was overwhelmed by performances with Carlos Kleiber or Zubin Mehta in my early years at the Bavarian State Opera (Munich). When I started there in September 1995, without any professional experience as a principal flutist, I performed “Lucia di Lammermoor“ with Edita Gruberova, the queen of coloratura in that time, without a rehearsal. We only went through the cadenza in her dressing room once. At the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra (BRSO) the Shostakovich Symphonies with Mariss Jansons inspired me very much or projects with Sir Simon Rattle (e.g. Mahler “Lied von der Erde“). Playing “Der Ring des Nibelungen” with Kirill Pretrenko in Wagner’s Festival Theatre in Bayreuth, Germany was an outstanding highlight in my professional career as an orchestra musician. Moreover, I will never forget the Nielsen concert I played with Herbert Blomstedt, and the Schulhoff Double Concerto with my colleagues, Lukas Kuen and Mariss Jansons. As an editor, I had the honour of editing three Mozart symphonies in Urtext editions for Breitkopf & Härtel.  Two of them are already published, K. 385 “Hafner” and K. 550. How about 3 pivotal moments that were essential to creating the artist that you've become? (1) To win the above mentioned competitions which opened so many doors for me, that I got the chance to play all the flute concerto repertoire with fine orchestras. (2) Entering the Bavarian State Opera. By listening to the world’s best singers I have gained innumerable insights about music. (3) With editing and essay writing, I widened my musical background and found (and founded) my musical personality. What do you like...

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Concert Review: Gonjiam Flute Festival (Hurel, Koyama, Wiese)

Posted by on Apr 2, 2018 in April 2018, Concert Reviews, Featured, Issues, Reviews | 0 comments

Concert Review: Gonjiam Flute Festival (Hurel, Koyama, Wiese)

The evening concert on February 21, 2018, at the Gonjiam Festival was enchanting. Juliette Hurel opened the performance with Takemitsu’s haunting, “Voice” followed by “Afternoon of a Faun." Hurel’s exquisitely voluptuous tone provided a beautiful landscape for the the flowing melodies, transporting the audience into the mythical world as painted in Debussy’s deft imagination.  Her evocative musicality and nimble fingers gave the Ropartz Sonate an electrifying finish to her portion of the program.       Yuki Koyama presented a Leclair's Sonata in E minor with grace and elegance, followed by Taffanel’s Fantasy on “Der Freischultz." Koyama’s impressive technique and ravishing sound left the audience dazzled by his performance.  A very impressive performance by Japanese flutist, Yuki Koyama.      Henrik Wiese played the Schubert Variations “Trockene Blumen” with exceptional sensitivity and with a dynamic spectrum of colors.  Wiese’s phrases were both gossamer delicate, as well as raging with power; each line placed with careful, and thoughtful insight.  Wiese presented the Prokofiev Sonata with a completely different palette, transforming with each movement, leaving the audience in suspense, and with a hunger for more.  Henrik Wiese is a consummate musician whose breathtaking colors, thrilling technique, and thorough musical analysis, make for a magnificent performer. --Viviana...

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Anne-Katherine Heinzmann: Album Review

Posted by on Apr 2, 2018 in April 2018, CD Reviews, Featured, Issues, Reviews | 0 comments

Anne-Katherine Heinzmann: Album Review

Degenerate Flute Music Rediscovered Anne-Katherine Heinzmann, Flute and Thomas Hoppe, Piano A few years ago Anne-Katherine Heinzmann released a CD of “Suppressed Music” – music by composers who were persecuted and/or murdered by the National Socialists (Nazi’s) because of their religion or family origin, who as Jews, Heinzmann said “contributed decisively to the sophistication and welfare of Europe.” Although none of these composers were French, their styles were highly influenced by French Modernism, jazz and neo classicism of various types. Heinzmann is a brilliant flutist, performing and teaching throughout the world. She is professor of flute at the University of Music, Nuremberg, leads numerous master classes, and has performed with leading chamber musicians and soloists internationally, including Leonard Hokanson, Miriam Fried, with the BBC Proms, at the Schleswig-Holstein Music Festival, and as Deputy Solo Flutist at the Frankfurt Opera and Museum Orchestra. Her playing is exquisite and she performs each work on the CD with perfect understanding, style, gorgeous tone, and with beautiful, musical coordination with her excellent pianist Thomas Hoppe. Included on the CD are the Erwin Schulhoff Sonata, Leo Smit Sonata, Hans Gal Drei Intermezzi, Gunter Raphael Sonata, and Alexandre Tansman Sonatine.  All of these works are a welcome addition to the flute repertoire, and I was glad to hear the Tansman, Gal, and Raphael for the first time. Tansman, Raphael and Gal all survived the war in exile, while we sadly lost Schulhoff and Smit. All the works reflect a tonal 20th century style and are each engaging and well crafted. Of the pieces I didn’t know beforehand (and you may not know either), I love the Tansman for its cheerfulness and the Raphael for its structural and harmonic complexity. These are wonderful pieces to add to our repertoire, and they benefited from the virtuosity and insight of Anne-Katherine’s playing! The CD is available on Audite and was nominated for the “Preis der Deursche Schallplattenkritik.” www.AnneKatherineHeinzmann   --Barbara...

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Demarre McGill plays Kevin Puts Concerto: Concert Review

Posted by on Apr 2, 2018 in April 2018, Concert Reviews, Featured, Issues, Reviews | 0 comments

Demarre McGill plays Kevin Puts Concerto: Concert Review

Shortly after returning from East Asia, I heard Demarre McGill perform Kevin Puts' Flute Concerto (2013) at Carnegie Hall with the New York Youth Symphony. McGill is Principal flute of the Seattle Symphony and acting assistant professor at CCM. He has performed as a soloist with the Chicago Symphony, Philadelphia Orchestra, Pittsburgh Symphony, San Diego Symphony, Baltimore Symphony, Milwaukee Symphony, and Buffalo Philharmonic, and received an Avery Fisher career grant. I loved this performance. McGill gave a beautiful, refined rendition, full of delightful surprises, with complete understanding of the composers ideas, most especially in the 2nd and 3rd movement. In the 2nd, which Puts says, “was written during a period in which I was rather obsessed with the second movement of Mozart’s Piano Concerto K.467.”  Puts quotes themes of the piece fully and piecemeal in the movement and McGill helped us feel the humor in the choice! In the 3rd movement, I loved the way McGill had an energetic conversation with the winds, brass and percussion, exposing the terrific timbre that was created between the instruments. The orchestra is made up of young, very accomplished players between the ages of 12 and 22, and they played extremely well, with energy as well as great sound and interpretation, led by their excellent young conductor, Michael Repper for whom they played enthusiastically. The large audience gave Demarre a resounding ovation for his beautiful, stellar performance. --Barbara...

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The Flute View In Concert (Seoul Arts Center)

Posted by on Apr 2, 2018 in April 2018, Blog, Featured, Issues | 0 comments

The Flute View In Concert (Seoul Arts Center)

The Flute View Trio premiered Nicole Chamberlain's OLYMPUS for Flute Trio and Orchestra, written exclusively for the Gonjiam Festival 2018.  Fluter Scooter, Viviana Guzman and Barbara Siesel, Soloists, Philippe Bernold, Conductor with the Gyeonggi Philharmonic Orchestra in the Seoul Arts Center in Seoul, Korea.                ...

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Gonjiam Flute Festival: Video Interviews

Posted by on Apr 2, 2018 in April 2018, Blog, Featured, Issues | 0 comments

Gonjiam Flute Festival: Video Interviews

Viviana Guzman interviewed several of the Guest Artists of the Gonjiam Festival. Browse below to see interviews with Peter-Lukas Graf, Philippe Bernold, Yunhwa Song, Demarre McGill, Anne-Catherine Heinzmann, Christina Fassbender, and Festival Directors Philip Jundt and Soohyun Paik.              ...

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Dr. G’s April Flute Horoscopes

Posted by on Apr 2, 2018 in April 2018, Dr. G's Flute Horoscopes, Featured, Issues | 0 comments

Dr. G’s April Flute Horoscopes

The ”bad” news is that Mercury is still in retrograde until April 16th. The good news is that a New Moon falls in the same sign that Mercury is retrograde on April 15th. This is a wonderful gift from the universe after a period of revising and rethinking. Many of us will find better ways to work on old projects and will be rewarded with a new pathway ahead. There is indeed a pot of gold and the end of the Mercury retrograde rainbow. Be patient and work through any difficulties or misunderstandings that may occur at this time. The other big news is that April ends with a Full Moon in the same house as the Full Moon that occurred on March 1st. A project that began in March will culminate at the end of April. This will be different for each sign, but the rare cyclical pattern of the Full Moons remains constant. Pay attention to what is ending during this time that connects back to that March 1st beginning. Mercury retrograde may have helped make this project into what it turn out to be at the end of the month. Aries (March 21-April 19) HAPPY BIRTHDAY! The month begins with Mercury still going retrograde in your 1st house of you and who you are in the world until April 16th. Hang in there! It is almost over. You are having major dejavu at the beginning of this month! Perhaps you have revisited a number of past recital pieces during the retrograde. Your interpretations of these works have certainly changed with time. Go ahead and program them for a new performance or audition during Mercury retrograde. They are not the same tunes your ears knew in years past. Use this period to also revisit your priorities in general. What are you devoting your time towards and is it taking your flute playing to the next level? If not, change it. Mars is in your 10th house of careers all month. You are very focused on your career and moving in a direction with your flute playing that better aligns with your musical mission. Mars is asking you to do all of the things in April. Go to that audition! Join that group! Host that impromtu recital! Prepare that conference lecture! Mercury retrograde is helping you to plan out your prep work carefully, but Mars is telling you to focus and take action. On April 15th, the New Moon in your sign is bringing in new developments that are truly meaningful to you and your life’s direction. This will be a breath of fresh air for you, Aries. It could be as simple as picking up a new piece from Flute World that really speaks to you, magnifying your strengths as a performer. It could also mean that all of the hard work you have put in during the first half of the month has somehow helped you to manifest a new playing opportunity. Take this as your moment to shine.  On the 20th of the month, the Sun joins Venus in your 2nd house of income. You will receive a financial gift (possibily as a result of this new performing gig). Use this money to buy something wonderful such as a new recording or a new piece...

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Music As Silence

Posted by on Mar 6, 2018 in Featured, Health & Wellness, Issues, Lifestyle, March 2018 | 0 comments

Music As Silence

"Transcendental Meditation is a simple, natural, effortless technique practiced 20 minutes twice each day while sitting comfortably with the eyes closed.  The TM technique allows your active mind to easily settle inward, through quieter levels of thought, until you experience the most silent and peaceful level of your own awareness — pure consciousness." I started practicing TM last fall, and in combination with plant medicine work, I have learned how to really listen to silence and feel stillness, both in my flute playing and in my life.  --Fluterscooter There wouldn't be music without silence, or movement without stillness.  How much are we paying attention to the spaces between notes, conversations, nature?  There is so much noise everywhere, and the noise can keep getting louder if you remain unconscious.  I have never had a television and am rarely on social media, have moved far away from loud cities, spend much of my days meditating and in quietude, and will soon do a 10 day silent Vipassana retreat. The idea of living as a monk or nun appeals to me. These might seem like extreme examples, but it is because most people do not understand how to really embrace the silence and be aware.  While driving, I often observe trees throughout the seasons, and as they are only branches in winter, the beautiful spring foliage would not exist if it was not for the spaces between the branches where the leaves will bloom. The shakuhachi is a great example of this.  In my past article, "Can We Achieve Enlightenment Through Sound?" I discussed breathing and meditation through practicing long tones, as monks used the shakuhachi as an extension of meditating (breathing meditation, in and out, and listening to the sound to achieve enlightenment).  What I realize now is that while breathing and meditation on the long tones is effective, listening to the space in between the notes is equally, if not more important, and when I practice long tones now, I am taking more time in the spaces rather than thinking about getting to the next note.  And this also relates to PROCESS.  Many performers are focused on the performance and forget about the process, because they are thinking to the future rather than the present.  I enjoy the process far more than the performance, and I like to practice what I call "mindless mindfulness," or "mindful mindlessness."  They are both the same but also different.  For example, making ice cream cones for 16 hours a day might sound like a boring, mindless activity, but it's all about the approach.  When we do any activity mindfully and filter out any noise, any activity can become meditative, peaceful, and pure. Before I started practicing TM, I did not fully understand meditation.  What are you supposed to think about?  Why are all these thoughts in my head and how do I get them out?  How do I relax?  By repeating a silent mantra 20 minutes a day, twice a day, I realized I'm not actually supposed to think about anything during meditation and just focus on my mantra! Of course, thoughts will come up, but just as easy as the thoughts enter, so can the mantra.  And that is really where it clicked for me.  By going back to a place of silence by mindless...

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