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Canary in a Coalmine Project. By Lois Herbine

Posted by on Nov 1, 2017 in Articles, Essays, Featured, Issues, November 2017 | 0 comments

Canary in a Coalmine Project. By Lois Herbine

Lois Bliss Herbine is an internationally renowned solo piccolo recording artist. All six accompanied recordings from her CD, Take Wing, including premieres of Michael Daugherty, Daniel Dorff and Vincent Persichetti, can be heard on radio stations across the United States. The Gramophone hails her recital as “high-flying” and Music Web International exclaims, "Another leading wind soloist takes flight”. Philadelphia Inquirer music critic David Patrick Stearns described her piccolo performance for her Concerts at Carmel series DTR records release a “model of color driven expression”. A premiere solo recording on Inverno Azul (BCM&D Records) of music by composer Cynthia Folio has gained much interest in her work Philadelphia Portraits: A Spiritual Journey for piccolo and piano which is currently being performed by professional piccoloists around the world. It's first known broadcast was August 22, 2016 on Canadian radio CKWR FM 98.5. Herbine has performed multiple times at National Flute Association conventions to favorable press, including premieres of solo music for piccolo by David Finko, Daniel Dorff, Cynthia Folio and Lucien Posman. She has performed on two closing ceremonies - in Anaheim 2010 as a duet with European piccoloist Peter Verhoyen and she shared the stage with some of the worlds' top piccolo players and the US Army Field Band during the 2015 closing ceremonies. Composer Howard Hersh’s I Had to Go Down in the Mines to Climb Up to the Sky is an aural memoir for solo piccolo with a ghost choir of 16 recorded piccolos. Its premiere will take place on a full piccolo recital in the Capistrano Concert Hall at Sacramento State University’s Festival of New American Music on November 7, 2017 at 8:00 PM The festival is one of the West Coast’s leading forums for contemporary American music and this year it is celebrating 40 years of free recitals, concerts, lectures and educational outreach. The premiere from this accomplished Californian composer will be the finale of my solo piccolo recital, including works by Daniel Dorff, Joseph Hallman, Cynthia Folio, Vincent Persichetti and Michael Daugherty. This concert, titled Moving West, is sponsored by Powell Flutes. A 2006 article that I wrote for New Music USA’s online publication TheNewMusicBox, Escaping the Nutcracker Suite: Composing for the 21st Century's Piccolo Player with sound samples from past recordings, attracted the attention of composers and professors of composition who reached out to me online. One in this community of readers was Howard Hersh. We began a correspondence and he sent me one of his recent CDs. I was immediately drawn to his music and knew that one day we would collaborate. I Had to Go Down in the Mines to Climb Up to the Sky was composed in 2013 in service of the bravery and anguish of America’s great immigrant experience. It was inspired by the history of my family, whose heroic lives as laborers facing daily struggles in the coal mining communities in both Wales and Pennsylvania laid the foundation for the opportunities that I and my children now enjoy. This living history connects two worlds for me- my love for the piccolo and reaching new audiences outside the orchestra and my love of ancestral research. My ancestral story begins with my great, great grandfather, John Lewis, who perished in the pit along with 178 men and boys in the great coalmining explosion of 1867 in Wales. Within weeks Great Britain set up the...

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A Cave, a Bone, a Flute. By Arlene Keiser and Nancy Horowitz

Posted by on Nov 1, 2017 in Articles, Essays, Featured, Issues, November 2017 | 0 comments

A Cave, a Bone, a Flute.  By Arlene Keiser and Nancy Horowitz

“Music and rhythm find their way into the secret places of our soul.” (Anon.) Life must have been quite difficult 35,000 years ago, during the Paleolithic Age. Ice covered half the earth’s surface. Humans spent their days seeking shelter, protection, food, and warmth. Most interestingly, however, they weren’t just concerned with basic survival, they were also creating music by playing flute! We know this because, in 2008, archeologist Nicholas Conard of the University of Tubingen and his colleagues made an astounding discovery. They excavated the oldest musical instrument ever known, a bone flute, 35,000-40,000 years old, in a cave known as Hohle Fels, in southern Germany.  As a result of this discovery, Conard’s team concluded that, “music played an important role in pre-historic life in southwest Germany.”      Earlier, in 2004, Conard and his team had explored caves in the area and found two small ivory flutes, as well as sculpted figures of a horse head, an aquatic bird, and a lion-man made of mammoth tusk ivory. However, it was not possible to define their precise ages. The discovery of the bone flute in 2008 was significant as its age was able to be determined by radiocarbon dating. This ancient flute was handcrafted from the wing bone of a griffon vulture. An early chipped-stone tool made by Paleolithic people was used to carve it out. There are five finger holes with a v-shaped notch at one end, where the player places his lips. The other end was found broken off with two to three inches missing. The flute measures 21.8 cm (8.5 in.) in length and 8 mm (0.3 in.) in diameter.      It’s possible to view the actual griffon vulture flute, which is housed in the Landesmuseum in Stuttgart, Germany. A natural question is how does it sound? We can’t be sure, because due to its age and delicate condition no one has played it. However, Wulf Hein, an experimental archaeologist, made a replica and can be seen on a YouTube video dressed in pre-historic garb explaining how he crafted his flute and performing The Star-Spangled Banner (see link below). His flute sounds very much like a present-day penny whistle. How did the original flute maker decide on where to place the holes? Amazingly, the holes are spaced based on a major scale! Did he experiment with many bone flutes and destroy them before deciding on this one? Was he playing diatonic scale lines? Pentatonic scales? Harmonics? Let’s paint our own picture, a portrait of Saturday night Paleolithic partying: our Stone Age musicians are relaxing near the Danube after a long week of foraging for food and shelter. What to do? Unfortunately, they are not able to travel down the river to listen to the Vienna Philharmonic. They have to create their own magic, and so a musical tradition in the form of a flute emerges! They gather around a fire and join the flute player singing songs, relaxing, enjoying the music, the stars, the evening, and each other’s company. This image is significant, as the Paleolithic Age witnessed the emergence of early modern humans coming together for the simple experience of music making. They enjoyed the pleasure and fulfillment that a musical instrument could bring to their ears, their souls, and their senses. By beginning this musical...

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Emi Ferguson: Amour Cruel Album Review

Posted by on Nov 1, 2017 in CD Reviews, Featured, Issues, November 2017, Reviews | 0 comments

Emi Ferguson: Amour Cruel Album Review

Emi Ferguson’s new album is a genre breaking, spectacular work of art! Emi’s premise is, “What if Louis XIV were living today and curated his court composers with musicians like Beyonce, Lana Del Rey or Adele?” In answer to that question, she used 17th century French songs as inspiration and fused old instruments with modern styles and production to create the truly original set of songs on the album. You may be wondering – songs?—flute album? – what’s she talking about?! Not only does Emi play flute(s) including modern and baroque flutes, she is also the stellar vocalist on the album. Yes, she’s a beautiful singer as well, and she wrote and arranged all the music too.   And if you’re wondering what else she does beautifully then check out the video of the opening track and title song, Amour Cruel, and marvel at the beautiful red dress that Emi created and designed! A very accomplished flutist, Emi won First Prize in the NFA’s Young Artist Competition, the NY Flute Club Young Artist Competition, the Mid Atlantic Flute Competition, and the Juilliard Concerto Competition. She is passionate about “new” and “old” music and has performed worldwide on both modern and baroque flutes in Switzerland, New York, and France and at major festivals like Marlboro, Lucerne, and Lake Champlain. We did a video interview of Emi in which she talks about the album, so I’ll spend some time on the songs themselves. As the title song implies, the bilingual tracks are all tales of love gone bad and they pack an emotional punch! The beauty of her flute playing and her expressive and intensely felt singing draw you into to the world of love and loss that are both enhanced by being combined. Track 10, Enfin la beaute que j’adore, for example, brings us back to the Renaissance in style with a slight inflection of folk music as well. The first title track, Amour Cruel, is a mostly vocal work in which Emi sings with deep emotional feeling and vocal inflection, accompanied by flute and a virtuoso team of musicians. In fact, each of her musicians is a virtuoso in their own right and are comfortable in both contemporary and classical styles. The outstanding musicians are Jordan Dodson/guitars, Paul Holmes Morton/theorbo, lute, and guitars, Doug Balliett/basses and viola da gamba and Sam Budish/percussion. On all the selections, Emi’s flute playing is beautiful, refined, expressive and full of sparkle, but to me this all goes without saying as this album is one of the most original and interesting I’ve ever heard. I hope it goes to the top of the pop charts as it is already has on both the classical crossover and classical charts as it has the power to open minds and hearts to classical music in a new way. www.amourcruel.com --Barbara...

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Starting a Flute Choir. By Ray-Michael Kauffman

Posted by on Nov 1, 2017 in Articles, Essays, Featured, Interviews, Issues, November 2017 | 0 comments

Starting a Flute Choir.  By Ray-Michael Kauffman

  What inspired you to start a flute choir?   I love playing the flute, and I love performing. I had played in flute choir ensembles growing up as well as in college and even now, in many flute choir groups I play with. I also believe that flute choirs have such a unique and special sound, with all the timbres of different flutes coming together making something magical. I concluded that there needs to be a choir closer in my area. The area I live in is an hour to a major city such as Philadelphia and Harrisburg, but there was no ensemble for adults like myself that had formal music training, but were not professional flutists and worked in other career paths. And I concluded that a lower key, “not-so -serious” group in my area would be well received. With my experience in different ensembles, I had a strong feeling what would work and what would not. I live in a thriving and quickly growing area (Lancaster County, PA), especially culture-related with many wonderful galleries and art studios. There’s a true need for varied musical groups that are not as professional as an orchestra in many areas across the country. Many of the average citizens in these areas tend to be more down-to-earth and people who really do not have exposure to classical music, and these citizens may find the traditional classical music stuff boring. Audience members who attend symphony concerts are geared especially for that. Smaller non-traditional adult musicians who are not professionals, can play various genres of music exposing the public to a diverse and entertaining program. I also knew that due to the high demand and all the responsibilities the adult hobbyist or non-traditional flutist had in their lives (such as children, working and working overtime, taking care of family, and other priorities) that the more low-key model would be well suited for this area. How did you find the members of your flute choir?   Kismet. I had returned to flute playing after many years of not playing due to adult life changes, and started taking lessons with Morgann E Davis Parrish many years ago. Through Morgann I met Dot Lippart, a wonderful flutist who also wanted a choir locally. We had talked about starting one, but it didn’t come in to fruition until meeting Jenny Fritsch at an adult flute summer program by The Pocono flute society. Marta Oberlin, who is the president of the Pocono Flute Society, had so much great advice and experience with starting a flute group. Jenny, Dot, and I started talking there and we all wanted a choir in our area. We enlisted William Hoff, who had worked as a professional flute player to help our group. With continued input and advice from Marta O., Morgann D., and from former flute professor at Drew University Dr. Virginia Schulze-Johnson, who William and I both knew, the four of us, William, Jenny, Dot, and I met several times and brainstormed about starting a choir. We thought it was prudent to post info about the flute group forming, in new papers, stores like grocery stores, libraries, at churches and with the social media (which is a big help) as well word of mouth. I learned that by being a musician, I know...

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Hélène Boulegue: Artist Interview

Posted by on Nov 1, 2017 in Featured, Interviews, Issues, November 2017 | 0 comments

Hélène Boulegue: Artist Interview

Having studied under renowned masters of the French School of Flute, graduated in Germany, and played for seven years in the multicultural Luxembourg Philharmonic Orchestra, Hélène Boulègue is a flutist born from numerous influences. This is what makes her sound color and musicality so personal. Three months after getting the First Prize at the Kobe International Flute Competition, Hélène just got appointed Solo Flute at the Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra, where she will start next spring. What was the process to audition for the Kobe Competition? It was quite a long one. First, we had to send a recording which would serve as a preliminary screening. We had to send it with the application almost a year before the actual competition was to take place. We then got the results of this preliminary audition in December 2016, six months before the competition. Out of 240 applications, the jury decided to keep 53 contestants, and I was very happy to learn I was one of them. Then, the actual competition was divided in four rounds with very different repertoire. The first round was composed of works for solo flute, and from the second round we had pianists as well (who, by the way, were awesome!). And the final round was with a well prepared orchestra and a very attentive conductor. It was a long process, but a very well organized one! How did you feel? I can't say I was feeling good or bad. My mood was constantly changing from being confident to utterly desperate, from believing in myself to doubting everything I had practiced so hard for. I stopped sleeping after the second round, and from then I was either practicing or lying in my bed trying to fall asleep or eating, because with the stress I couldn't eat more than three bites at a time, which made me hungry quite often... I was a mess! But I had my very own team of cheerleaders back home (my friends and family), and they were here to write messages to me the whole time, and I think they are what kept me going through all four rounds.   How did you prepare? I am a morning person, so I woke up at 6 every weekday and went to the concert hall to practice at 7, so that I could practice two hours before the orchestra rehearsal. When I would still be able to concentrate at the end of the rehearsals, I would practice some more, but it was not that often. That's why my early practice session was very important to me. During the whole preparation it was of crucial importance that I went to bed early, in order to get enough sleep to wake up more or less refreshed the next day. I went to see my former teacher once to play part of my program, and I also went to a course one month before the competition. This course was a life-changing moment for me, because I met the very positive person that is Julien Beaudiment, and both his amazing playing and heart warming comments inspired me anew in the last weeks. Which pieces did you have to play? The first round was composed of the following works: -Bach, Partita, first and second movement -Bozza, Etude arabesque Number...

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Dr. G’s November Flute Horoscopes. By Rachel Taylor Geier

Posted by on Nov 1, 2017 in Blog, Dr. G's Flute Horoscopes, Featured, Issues, November 2017 | 0 comments

Dr. G’s November Flute Horoscopes.  By Rachel Taylor Geier

Welcome to November 2017! It is officially Scorpio Season. For most of this month the Sun, Jupiter, and Venus are all highlighting the sign of Scorpio. The New Moon falling on November 18th in the sign of Scorpio is also extending the spotlight on this trifecta well into December. This means that there will be a major focus on an area of your life (and flute playing) that is expanding and becoming increasingly more creative. Of course, each sign will experience something different. Wherever Scorpio falls in your sign, it will demand your attention for the next several weeks. Be careful! When Jupiter and Venus align there is also a tendency to overindulge. Try to remain grounded this month! Scorpio (October 23-November 21) HAPPY BIRTHDAY! You are officially the star of the zodiac this month. You usually are a bit more popular at this time of year as the Sun beams down on your sign for the first 3 weeks of the month, however 2017 ushers in 2 other mega fans to your entourage: Jupiter and Venus. This trifecta (Sun, Jupiter, Venus) is in your 1st house of who you are and your visibility in the world. This is the perfect time to host a solo recital. You are the diva and everybody is looking at you and loving your creative spirit. The spotlight is not just on you for the first 3 week but also extends into next month. 8 weeks of being the most popular flutist in town! This is your Beyoncé moment. Enjoy it! Be careful not to go overboard or you may alienate others. Be humble and gracious like a true Scorpio. Mercury will be moving into Sagittarius on November 5th turning your attention to the 2nd house of income and what you value in the world. You are thinking about how to turn your newfound popularity into a source of income. Try marketing your solo recital to middle schools, high schools, or other groups of potential new flute students. Finally, Mars will remain in Libra in your 12th house of behind the scenes activities. You are burning the midnight oil working on a top-secret project. A new CD? A publication? Another performance? An audition? Perhaps this is a project that will eventually increase your income through passive earnings. Mars does not really like being in the 12th house, so try to enjoy the quiet work time without feeling stuck or confined. You are working on something very special. Full Moon – November 3rd in Taurus in your 7th house of relationships. You might hear from an old friend or colleague on this day or have new, visionary, creative ideas. Collaborate and play some duets together! New Moon – November 18th in Scorpio in your 1st house of visibility and who you are. This is the best day of the month to host a solo recital. Perform your heart out on this day! You will receive a standing ovation. Sagittarius (November 22-December 21) You will be focused on giving back to others during the month of November. For the first 3 weeks of the month, the Sun, Jupiter, and Venus will all be in your 12th house of behind the scenes activities, spiritual studies, and charity. It seems like an oxymoron for the Sun to...

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Schenkerian Analysis on Hamburger Sonata. By Heidi Kay Begay

Posted by on Nov 1, 2017 in Articles, Essays, Featured, Issues, November 2017 | 0 comments

Schenkerian Analysis on Hamburger Sonata. By Heidi Kay Begay

Heidi Kay Begay is currently a doctoral flute performance major studying with Dr. Lisa Garner Santa at Texas Tech University. Heidi has held many teaching titles, which include adjunct music instructor positions at Eastern New Mexico University and Tarrant County College. She has held executive and festival committee positions with the Texas Flute Society; such positions include: registration coordinator, festival co-chair, industry/commercial liaison, and president. Her March 2010 publication, “Hopi Culture and the Music of Katherine Hoover,” can be found in Flute Talk magazine. Heidi’s degrees include a Masters of Music from Northwestern State University of Louisiana, and a Bachelor’s of Art in Music from the University of Arizona. Her past flute teachers include Dr. Brian A. Luce, Dr. Diane Boyd-Schultz, Dr. Dennette Derby McDermott, and Don Bailey. How A Schenkerian Analysis Can Help A Musical Performance of C.P.E. Bach’s “Hamburger” Flute Sonata in G Major, Wq. 133, Rondo: Presto Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach was the second living son of Johann Sebastian and his first wife Maria Barbara Bach. Emanuel Bach, as he was known within the family, 1 was born on March 08, 1714 in Weimar, and died at the age of seventy-four on December 14, 1788 in Hamburg, Germany. C.P.E. Bach was the most successful and notable of J.S. Bach’s descendants; and in fact, Schenker stated that he was the only son of Johann Sebastian Bach’s worth studying. For thirty years. C.P.E. Bach worked for Frederick the Great from 1738 to 1768. Frederick the Great was a music supporter; he not only was a composer himself, but was a flutist, too. Emanuel Bach later accepted the prestigious position of director of sacred music in Hamburg, Germany in 1768. Bach replaced his godfather and colleague, George Philipp Telemann in Hamburg. Bach remained in this city for the next twenty years, until his death in 1788. The research presented here will focus on C.P.E. Bach’s “Hamburger” flute sonata in G Major (Wq. 133), movement two, and how a Schenkerian analysis can aid the musician with the performance of the piece. From a performer’s perspective, it can be quite daunting to study the notes at hand; however, if one were to understand the form, harmonic analysis, and a Schenkerian approach to the piece, one will find ease within the technical difficulties. A Schenkerian analysis is an approach of musical analysis of tonal music based on the theories of Heinrich Schenker (1868-1935). The objective of a Schenkerian analysis is to interpret the underlying structure of a tonal work and to help reading the score according to that structure. Much like a painting, a Schenkerian analysis can be thought of the same way. Imagine an artist depicts a desert scene with the blue sky in the background, mountains in the middle ground, and cacti in the foreground. In the background, there is not much detail, but as the illustration will show, there is much detail in the foreground, so much so that one can view the needles on the cacti. A Schenkerian analysis can be approached the same way. At the background level, one will hear the Ursatz, which is the fundamental structure that contains the Urlinie and the Bassbrechung. The Ursatz is at the deepest level, and is a progression presenting the ultimate structure of a tonal composition.2 Within the middle ground of the musical composition, one will hear melodic prolongations...

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Yubeen Kim: Concert Review. By TAMUC Flute Studio

Posted by on Nov 1, 2017 in Concert Reviews, Featured, Issues, November 2017, Reviews | 0 comments

Yubeen Kim: Concert Review. By TAMUC Flute Studio

  On Sunday, October 1st, 2017, the Texas A&M University-Commerce Flute Studio, directed by Dr. Julee Kim Walker, hosted International Flutist Yubeen Kim, in one of two US Debut Recitals. His performance was held in Jack and Lou Finney Concert Hall on the campus of Texas A&M University-Commerce in Commerce, TX, with pianist Anastasia Markina. Yubeen’s performance was nothing short of true artistry and passion, and spoke from the heart. Together with Anastasia, they created a magical evening of colorful, powerful music. Here are some of the impressions from the students: “He filled up every single area of the concert hall with a tremendously clear and beautiful sound, regardless of the dynamic!” -Daria Smetana, Senior “His tapers were the best that I've ever heard. There were many moments where I could not tell if he was still playing or if it was the piano!” -Lenora Willman, Sophomore “The fluidity of his double tonguing was something I strive to be able to do!” -Katie Petty, Senior “I throughly enjoyed listening to the expert musicality on his lyrical pieces and his clean, clear, defined technique on his faster pieces. It is everything I strive to be as a musician.” -Hannah VanDover, Freshman “Hearing such a young flutist execute difficult passages inspires me to never leave the practice room! His precision in fast articulation patterns but gracefulness and connectivity in the slower lines exhibits a great variety in style and a phenomenal sense of professional technique.” -Harley Smith, Freshman “After listening to his performance, it was incredibly difficult for me to believe that he is only 20 years old! His level of professionalism and his technique are way beyond his years. That was a truly inspiring performance.” -Nataly Ruan, Freshman “Everything about him was absolutely amazing. He is so young which has inspired me to never give up on my dreams. The different colors in tone were absolutely beautiful and his double tonguing was so clear and phenomenal. If he made a mistake, up I could not tell at all! His memorization was breathtaking.” -Leslie Corona, Freshman “After listening to him play three pieces I have spent time with myself, I was completely blown away by the ease that he played them. His releases were remarkable and the quality of pianos and fortes were the mark of a true artist! I thoroughly enjoyed his interpretation and performance!” -Shannon Peterson, Senior “Everything about his performance was so inspiring and it was truly such a great recital. His tone was flawless and his articulation was even more so. The fact that he is so young made all of it so much more amazing and I am so proud to say that I had the chance to witness the playing of such a great artist!” -Erin Walton, Freshman “The concert was much more than just playing flute! He has clearly thrown all of himself into his art. The mood of each piece was depicted aurally and visually as he let the emotions of the music show in his performance.” -Taylor Hennig, Senior “I was in awe the skill that was displayed to me! This man has clearly dedicated a countless amount of hours to becoming an astounding musician, and it definitely showed in the performance that I witnessed. His double tonguing was phenomenal, his memorization...

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Nicole Riner: Book Review

Posted by on Nov 1, 2017 in Book Reviews, Featured, Issues, November 2017 | 0 comments

Nicole Riner: Book Review

Nicole Riner: A Flutist’s Expression Workbook   For many years aspiring flutists have warmed-up and studied Marcel Moyse’s De La Sonorite and Tone Development through interpretation as an in depth guide to developing tone and understanding how to turn that beautiful tone into an expressive sound and a meaningful interpretation of the music. Now, dedicated professor and wonderful performer Nicole Riner has put together an additional workbook that can help students go even deeper into studying how to be creative in a musical interpretation. It is clear that Ms Riner (Flute professor at the University of Wyoming) has thought long and hard about how to lead her students to musical and interesting interpretations of standard and new repertoire and, in this book she puts some of her ideas to the page! She has taken 19th and early 20th century vocal exercises and adapted them for flutists, with the thought that we as flutists will come to these pieces with fresh ears having never heard the pieces before. Each piece is presented first unadorned and then Nicole adds articulation, dynamics and her thoughts on the exercise. It’s interesting to see the many variations of interpretation through her eyes. She then instructs the student to bring her own ideas to the unadorned piece and to add their own ideas with their pencils!! The workbook also includes four duets that you can play with colleagues so you can try out your own ideas in performance. I’m so impressed by Nicole’s attention to detail and dedication to helping all flutists reach they musical potential, her goal to creating beautiful music first and foremost in our performance since we spend so much time on the technical aspects of our playing and practice. I recommend this book to all teachers and students who are at this point in their studies and musical journey. For more information, please visit http://www.nicoleriner.info/   --Barbara Siesel  ...

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Erica Peel: Artist Interview

Posted by on Oct 1, 2017 in Featured, Interviews, Issues, October 2017 | 1 comment

Erica Peel: Artist Interview

A versatile flutist and piccoloist, Erica Peel enjoys an exciting career as an orchestral player, chamber musician, soloist, composer and teacher.  Piccoloist of the Philadelphia Orchestra, she is praised for her “effortless” & “authentic” performances.  Erica has held positions with the Honolulu Symphony, Omaha Symphony, San Diego Symphony, and has been seen in performances with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Chicago Symphony and Houston Symphony. What was the process to audition for the Philadelphia Orchestra? The audition process was fairly typical for an orchestral position.  There was a preliminary round, where all applicants played for about 5 mins behind a screen.  Although I'm not sure exactly how many candidates there were, my guess is around 100.  This round lasted over 2 days, I believe, and they narrowed it down to about 10-15 candidates for a semi-final round.  This round was still screened, and each person played for around 20 mins.  The committee then narrowed the pool further to only 3 applicants. We each played a final round, which was unscreened, and had a concerto (w/pianist) and solo (chosen by the candidate) component.  After the final round, two of us were chosen to do 2 trial weeks with the orchestra, which means we would rehearse and perform with the orchestra during 2 weeks of their season.  This is also pretty common, especially for a solo instrument like the piccolo.  They want to hear how you fit in with the sound of the orchestra, feel what the chemistry is like in the section, and see how you respond to the music director - all crucial for long term happiness in an ensemble!  At the end of my second trial week (but before I played my last concert of the week), they called me in to the green room, and the entire committee, including Yannick, was there to congratulate me. How did you feel? During the audition, I felt more relaxed than normal.  I had a job that I adored in San Diego, and had low expectations for this particular audition... I mean, it's THE Philadelphia Orchestra!!  I didn't think I was worthy, but it's one of those auditions that you take no matter what.  The farther I advanced, the more shocked I was.  I mostly tried to keep reminding myself how lucky I was to play in that hall "as a soloist" THREE times (in each round), and really attempted to enjoy each moment I was there. During the trial weeks, I felt much more pressure, as I was hyper aware that people were judging me - not maliciously, of course, but it's what they are supposed to do!  That being said, the musicians were very warm and welcoming, which was a relief.  Those "pinch me" moments were plentiful, and again, I just tried to soak it the experience, fully expecting that this would be the (potentially only) chance of a lifetime to play with the Philadelphia Orchestra.  The musicians were magnificent... I had never felt a unity in musicianship like that before.  Everyone breathed and moved together, and gave 150% every time.  I almost cried during every rehearsal and performance, just overwhelmed with what I was hearing/feeling and grateful to be a part of it, even if just for a couple of weeks. "When they told me I got the job, I definitely cried." When they told me I got the job, I...

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