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July 2017 PDF Download

Posted by on Jul 2, 2017 in Blog, July 2017 | 0 comments

July 2017 PDF Download

Download the PDF of The Flute View July 2017. Interviews with Lady Jeanne Galway and Dallas Flute Teacher Extraordinaire, Monica Song. Kaori Fuji Cecil shares what is new with Music Beyond. Dr. Cate Hummel shares tips on Blowing the flute! Dr. Nicole Riner shares a Commissioning Guide. Fluterscooter shares her unique marketing idea. Rachel Hacker shares Tips of Smart Social Media Posting. Barbara Siesel shares Entrepreneurial Resources. Dyan Parker, Music is the Ointment That Heals. CD Reviews of the latest from Rozalind MacPhail and Bill McBirnie. Happy Reading!  -The Flute View Team...

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Lady Jeanne Galway: Artist Interview

Posted by on Jul 1, 2017 in Featured, Interviews, Issues, July 2017 | 0 comments

Lady Jeanne Galway: Artist Interview

A graduate of New York City’s Mannes College of Music, Lady Jeanne Galway has risen to become one of the world’s leading female flautists. She is an accomplished and much celebrated artist who regularly tours internationally in diverse and virtuosic programmes, and is also deeply committed to music education initiatives.   Lady Galway’s concerto appearances have been with many of the leading orchestras in the United States, including Chicago, Philadelphia, and Pittsburgh. In Europe, she regularly performs in London, Milan, Rome, Vienna, Salzburg and Zürich, and she frequently visits Tokyo, Beijing and Singapore. Recent performance highlights have seen Lady Galway joining her husband Sir James in concert tours across the globe, including South America and South Africa, and a recital at Carnegie Hall. Forthcoming highlights of her 2015/2016 concert season include major tours of Asia, Europe and the United States.   Can you give us 5 career highlights?   As a young student in winning the NY Flute Club Competition and performing the Demersseman 6e Solo de Concert   My first professional principal flute orchestral position: Queens Philharmonic Orchestra with JoAnne Falletta as conductor   Recording and my first duo CD for RCA/Sony: The Bach Trio Sonata with James Galway, Monica Huggett, Sarah Cunningham and Philipp Moll on Cembalo, and taking it on a 20 plus US concert tour including a sold out Carnegie Hall performance.   Performing with London Mozart Players in The Vienna Musikverein and receiving a standing ovation, having to play the last movement of the Cimerosa double concerto again.   Performing with the London Symphony at the Royal Albert Hall   Becoming Sir James Galway’s teaching assistant   How about 3 pivotal moments that were essential to creating the artist that you've become? Having a top level, performing professional flutist as a teacher in High school   Moving to New York City and studying at the Mannes College of Music at the age of 17, where I began pursuing my dream being surrounded only by music and musicians.   Meeting and developing a relationship with James Galway - ours was first a musical one!   What do you like best about teaching?   Everything. It is one of the greatest gifts in my life that I have been given. There is nothing like sharing one’s knowledge with a student, no matter what level and share all that I have learned over the years. I feel myself become someone else when I teach.   What do you like best about performing?   The magic…..   New CD releases?   Yes, but still in the pipelines - cannot yet discuss.  I have a meeting in NY this week to discuss this...watch this space!   What does your schedule look like for the next 6 months?   At the moment, I am working on getting our Galway Flute Academy On-Line Series up and running. This is huge project, which includes pre- recorded videos of playing and teaching of both my husband and myself, along with many tips for not only flutists but all musicians of all levels. Summer - Our 27th Galway Flute Academy Festival in Weggis Switzerland - very exciting.   Ravinia festival in the US with orchestral concert with the Chicago Symphony, recital and a day of workshops.   September - 3 weeks tour of Ireland a UK- including Live on the BBC- Last Night of the Proms from...

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Bill McBirnie: Album Review

Posted by on Jul 1, 2017 in CD Reviews, Featured, Issues, July 2017, Reviews | 0 comments

Bill McBirnie: Album Review

Bill McBirnie & Bruce Jones, Grains of Sand Bill McBirnie’s new collaboration album with Bruce Jones is a wonderful melding of creativity! Jones, the composer on these tracks plays guitar, percussion and synths as well as the vocals and McBirnie is on flute, alto flute and piccolo as well as co-composing on tracks 3,5,9 and 11. The music is diverse as Jones, though brought up in Brazil, combines many other influences into his output including, rock, hip hop and new age, as well as improvisation. Bill describes their way of working together like this: “A project of this nature—involving just the two of us—takes considerable time to complete and so it inevitably proceeds in stages. Each track starts with Bruce writing, playing and recording whatever idea he has in mind. After Bruce has laid down what is a fairly complete track, we then overlay any flute melodies he has in mind. In addition, we conjure up shots and harmony parts and overdub these. After that, we go back and I improvise over the entire track. Finally, we take whatever we have (…which is typically too much…) edit it and mix it down. Of course, we “subtract” far more than we “add” as the process unfolds until sooner or later (…usually later…) we find what we’re after.” I love this description of perfect collaboration and it shows in the album. The melodies and tunes are excellent and the flute(s) improv’s are original, brilliant and exciting. The layering of the alto, flute and piccolo are seamless and the Bruce’s vocals add the perfect addition contrast. Bill is a virtuoso player, with a beautiful expressive sound and masterful fingers! When I listen to this album I feel very happy!!! www.extremeflute.com extremeflute@look.ca -Barbara Siesel...

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Keeping Up With Kaori: What’s Next for Music Beyond

Posted by on Jul 1, 2017 in Articles, Entrepreneurship, Essays, Featured, Interviews, Issues, July 2017 | 0 comments

Keeping Up With Kaori: What’s Next for Music Beyond

We wrote about Music Beyond a few years back.  How has Music Beyond grown since then?   In August, Music Beyond will mark 3 years since the inception. Our student base has grown about 6x and we have manage to provide over 400 hours of training (by the time I come back from the trip I'm about to head out, it'll most likely be over 500 hours!).   What has changed for MB, and what new components have you added?   Our first initiative was a music teacher training program for existing woodwind musicians in Kinshasa, the capital of the Democratic Republic of Congo. This program is still continuing, but we also started Congo's very first All-female chamber ensemble last year.   Your gala was incredible!  Tell us some of the key steps in organizing and arranging a charity event.   Oh dear... I don't even know where to begin! Come up with an overall budget, find a venue suitable for the expected number of guests, find caterer, decide on the overall theme / character of the event, secure keynote speakers and/or special guests that fits to the theme/character of the event... Then all the tedious work begins- go over the details about million times, sending out invitations (over and over and over!!), finding sponsors, secure silent auction items, making/updating tons of spread sheets, making / printing programs.... etc etc etc. Got the idea? ;)   You'll be in the Congo when this comes out.  What will you be doing on this trip, specifically?   I will be working with the musicians for almost 4 weeks this time. Monday through Saturday from 11am to 6pm outside! I will continue to work with the woodwind players but my focus this time will be all-female ensemble. LOTS of fundamental exercises, both private and group lessons, ensemble coaching... And a concert at the Japanese Ambassador's Residence!   What is the role of music in empowering citizens of DRC?  and especially the women of DRC?   DR Congo is one of the most difficult counties on earth. Capital city Kinshasa has 12 million people, yet there are many neighborhoods that don't have electricity or running water. Majority of Congolese families can't afford education for kids and especially if you are a girl, the chance for education diminishes even further. (It's normal for a family to send only boys to school but not girls) Multiple conflicts and wars have been taking place for over 2 decades straight and the government is completely corrupt. On top of all that, DRC is known as the "rape capital of the world" and is labeled as "the worst place to be a woman". So, obviously many people had completely lost hope and faith - both men and women. As a woman, it's even harder surviving, let alone thriving in DRC. Having said that, there ARE groups of people who are doing everything in their power to moving forward, building their community from the ground up and stay hopeful. What kind of people can do that? - People who manage to find fulfillment in life. Music can be a great source for fulfillment and when we are fulfilled, it gives us a tremendous amount of dignity, confidence and happiness, which result in being able to be empathetic to others and help each other. Speaking...

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Dr. Cate’s Corner: Blowing is the Foundation of Playing by Dr. Cate Hummel

Posted by on Jul 1, 2017 in Articles, Essays, Featured, Issues, July 2017 | 1 comment

Dr. Cate’s Corner: Blowing is the Foundation of Playing by Dr. Cate Hummel

Blowing and….. We know we need to blow to play the flute. This seems patently obvious, but do we really know how to blow in a way that informs our tone, technique, articulation and phrasing? I would say maybe not always, based on my own experience as a student, a teacher, a performer and as an observer in masterclasses. More than anything else, top players and teachers know how to use their air to give life to the music, shape the phrases, define the articulation, create color in their tone and show the intention of the composer. How they use the air defines absolutely everything else about their playing. Let’s break this down and examine the role that blowing occupies in flute playing. To start with, our breath is life itself, not merely the force that creates the sound on the flute. That we breathe separates us from inanimate objects and defines our existence. Marcel Moyse said, “Don’t simply blow into the flute--give it your warm breath.” In other words, put your very life essence into the flute. When I was a kid, I loved the plastic overlays that you would find in encyclopedias. I thought they were really cool. It didn’t matter what the topic; it could be anatomy, geography, dinosaurs, pretty much anything that you could illustrate by progressively adding layers of complexity. I would go looking in the encyclopedia just to find these overlay illustrations, not because I wanted any specific information, but because I wanted to see how the different layers transformed the original illustration at the bottom of all the layers. This type of overlay illustration is a perfect analogy for playing the flute (or any wind instrument). The basis, the foundation of everything we do on the instrument starts with our air. Absolutely everything else we do, be it tone color, phrasing, technique or articulation is dependent on having consistent control over our air. In other words, the other things are overlays on top of how we are using our air: blowing and embouchure, blowing and technique, blowing and articulation…. If how we use our air is the essential thing, what about all the other elements of playing the flute? Embouchure - goes hand in hand with air. Embouchure is what shapes and directs the air. Embouchure can create colors, adjust pitch and shape phrases. Technique - is supported by how we use the air. Without steady blowing and breath energy between the notes, all the technical studies in the world won’t make your playing sparkle. You can work on smooth, clean combinations, but it is the sensation of the air moving through and between the notes that gives your technique energy and pizzazz. Articulation - breath based rather than tonguing based. As Nyfenger liked to say, “Tonguing is the anti-tone.” Learn to vary your blowing to show the character and style of what you are playing. Trilling - the energy and intensity of your trills is based on your blowing rather than your wiggling finger(s). One of my earliest experiences as a teacher fresh out of a master’s degree was with a girl who came to me for lessons in order to work on her technique. She couldn’t move her fingers fast enough, or so she thought. The first thing she played...

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Flute Music and Ice Cream Trucks…Again?

Posted by on Jul 1, 2017 in Entrepreneurship, Featured, Issues, July 2017 | 0 comments

Flute Music and Ice Cream Trucks…Again?

You may wonder why you've been seeing me on many flutists' photos back in my ice cream truck...in New York City.  I needed to stay in New York for a few months for some concerts and events, and since I found myself with some "free time" (and I use that term very loosely), I decided to jump back on the truck for a few reasons.   *I don't always want to play the flute (gasp), and work on business, or think!  My brain needs a break as I am always going non-stop, and I feel guilty if I'm not doing something active.  I don't exactly take time off from work as many of you know.  I guess I could be called an extreme workaholic.  So the ice cream truck satisfies my need to always keep working. *It's fun!  Besides the noise and traffic of Times Square everyday, I actually enjoy doing it.  It can be very meditative, repeating the same thing mindlessly but also mindfully for up to 15 hours a day. *I'm using it as a way to meet interesting people who might not have known about flute, classical music, etc...I've had many flutists join me in conversation on the truck with customers, which has shown that we're all connected through music.  And many people who came to the truck during the interviews are flutists and musicians themselves! *I am also using it to promote my latest album.  I find the internet to be extremely spammy these days, and everyone online with a music project seems to be a giant promoting bot, and I miss the connection and engagement with real people, and I think other people miss that too.  I get to talk to them about the project and hand out flyers with the links for them to check out, and many of them have!   I'll be posting some fun videos on The Flute View's facebook page throughout the summer, so make sure to check it out.  And eat some ice cream.  It is summer, after all!  ...

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Commissioning New Music: A Guide to Getting Started by Nicole Riner

Posted by on Jul 1, 2017 in Articles, Essays, Featured, Issues, July 2017 | 0 comments

Commissioning New Music: A Guide to Getting Started by Nicole Riner

Praised for her "luscious, full sound" (American Record Guide) and "effortless precision" (Flutist Quarterly), Nicole Riner maintains an active national presence as a recitalist and pedagogue. She has presented master classes at universities and conservatories across the country and has performed with orchestras and at summer festivals, chamber music series, and flute fairs in the United States, South American, and Europe. A champion of new contemporary music, Nicole has also commissioned and premiered over twenty works both as a soloist and with her chamber group, Verismo Trio. In 2016, she joined the board of Flute New Music Consortium, a commissioning organization for flutists. Nicole currently teaches at University of Wyoming, where she is Visiting Assistant Professor or Flute.   Commissioning New Music: A Guide to Getting Started   This is a preview (and hopefully helpful resource for later!) of the presentation I am leading on behalf of Flute New Music Consortium at the Music by Women Festival March 3-4 in Columbus, MS.  If you're in the area, I hope you can come!  Some amazing music by Nicole Chamberlain, Amber Beams, and Kay HE will also be performed. And some of this information will be presented again, in round table form with composers and commissioners, at NFA in Minneapolis this summer! Funding Ideas for Commissioning Projects:   GRANTS   Aggregate Sites: American Composers Forum: composers forum.org/programs/commissions-awards-grants-fellowships BMI Foundation: www.bmi.com/foundation/ Musical Online: www.musicalonline.com/foundation_grants.htm Barlow Endowment for Music Composition: barlow.byu.edu/Pages/index.html Things to know: There is one commission prize every year for an LDS composer, and another one every year for the general public; since requirements are so open-ended, this is a very competitive application. Carnegie Corporation Aggregate Site: carnegie.org/grants/grants-database Things to know: Grants here often require a special focus and/or educational content, so read about the grants first, then tailor your project to the required language. Chamber Music America Classical Commissioning Program: www.chamber-music.org/programs/classical/grants#1408 Things to know: must be a member of CMA to apply; the director of the program is very hands-on, so make contact with her as you develop your proposal to see if she has any suggestions for making it better. Creative Capital: www.creative-capital.org/ourprogram Things to know: There is no strictly classical music category, just a general “performing arts” group, and integration with other artworks is an important element to the projects they fund. National Endowment for the Arts: www.nea.gov/grants/apply Things to know: highly competitive; if you are writing for a grant through your school, only one application per school per year, is accepted, so coordinate with your school director to ensure you are qualified.   ARTS ORGANIZATIONS   Local and stat arts organizations often have either specific grant applications for artists or discretionary money for intriguing proposals.  Must be a member of the organization to apply.  To look up your state and region, go to the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies: www.nasaa-arts.org   CROWD FUNDING   Go Fund Me: crowdfunding.com (No limit required, no penalty for not reaching goal) Indiegogo: indiegogo.com Kickstarter: www.kickstarter.com (Financial goal must be reached in order to collect) Rocket Hub: www.rockethub.com How to Find Composers:   POST ANNOUNCEMENTS ON FORUMS   American Composers Forum: composersforum.org Composer’s Forum: composersforum.ning.com Cornell University Composers Forum: music.cornell.edu/calendar/composers-forum European Composers Forum: composersforum.eu UNT Composers Forum: music.unt.edu/students/composers-forum Washington Composers Forum: www.washingtoncomposersforum.org Young Composers Forum: www.youngcomposers.com   …AND ON FACEBOOK   Composers...

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Rozalind MacPhail: Album Review

Posted by on Jul 1, 2017 in CD Reviews, Featured, Issues, July 2017, Reviews | 0 comments

Rozalind MacPhail: Album Review

Rozalind MacPhail grew up in Canada on a small group of islands nestled in the harbour of Toronto, Ontario called Toronto Island. She has lived in many parts of Canada but it was the artistically vibrant city of St. John’s, Newfoundland that stole her heart. Following years of classical music performance training at the Etobicoke School of the Arts,  University of Toronto and University of Ottawa, she has pursued her interest in a wide range of musical genres, while performing as guest flutist with other artists, including Yo La Tengo, Lou Barlow, Constantines, Great Lake Swimmers, Elliott Brood and Pick a Piper. Rozalind MacPhail recently won MusicNL's Female Artist of the Year and an East Coast Music Award for Electronic Recording of the Year.   “It can be so unsettling when we are forced to let go of loved ones, get rid of bad habits, deal with painful memories or change unhealthy life patterns. We hope this music will help you cope with life’s unexpected moments. May it ease you into the present moment, help you feel grounded and capable of facing any challenge that comes your way." Rozalind MacPhail Rozalind continues, "The parts were actually recorded to the sunrise each day for the entire month of February and I kept my first take of all the flute parts. It was inspired by the death of famous Newfoundland stained glass artist, Graham Howcroft who was my friend and roommate.  Kim Henninger and Shawn Parke of Portland, Oregon (film composers of EMBERS and LUCKY) created the electronics so it was a collaborative effort.  Stephen Vardy is a yoga and meditation instructor at Moksha Yoga in St. John's."   "Sunset Sunrise" music is for connecting to our higher selves, for rising above daily concerns, to open into the space of Love. The CD opens with sustained electronic sounds and a guided meditation by Stephen Vardy. The second track begins with sustained electronic sounds which provide a nice foundation for the soaring and sparing flute lines. When the bansuri flute finally enters, it is as if one can actually see the sun rising. This is a long, 25 minute track, perfect for a morning meditation. The third track entitled, Sunset, features another bed of electronic sounds and light tabla sounds actually captured on the flute! and overtone sounds for 25 minutes making this the consummate meditation CD, one track perfectly tailored for the morning and the other one for the evening. The album liner notes suggest the following:   Get yourself comfortable and take a moment to relax, rejuvenate and release your day! We hope this music will help you cope with life’s unexpected moments. May it ease you into the present moment, help you feel grounded and capable of facing any challenge that comes your way.   MacPhail says, “There is a great need in our world right now to find ways of tapping into our inner peace while being in the midst of so much uncertainty.” Rozalind MacPhail certainly has created a beautifully serene way to invoke meditation. Perfect for daily meditations, this digital album, "Sunset Sunrise",  is a perfect companion to any meditation routine.  Rozalind MacPhail is a fountain of creativity, a plethora of surprises and colors. -Viviana Guzman Listen to Rozalind MacPhail's Bandcamp link...

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Monica Song: Artist Interview

Posted by on Jul 1, 2017 in Featured, Interviews, Issues, July 2017 | 0 comments

Monica Song: Artist Interview

Monica Song is one of those teachers who have a gift for drawing out the best in their students. A native of Korea who grew up with a love of music, Song has been teaching flute in Dallas for 25 years. Her students place first in many competitions and win a slew of music awards. They also earn scholarships to top colleges.   Song started her musical career in a children’s choir at age 6. She switched to flute in high school and became a member of the Korean Broadcasting System Symphony and Seoul Woodwind Quintet at age 21.   When she and her husband came to the United States, she joined the Alexandria, Va., Symphony and became its principal flutist. After a few years, they moved to Dallas, where she opened a flute studio. A member of many music organizations, Song has herself received many awards and accolades for the accomplishments of her students.     Can you give us 3 pivotal moments that were essential to creating the artist that you've become? Tell us about your Teaching Studio, it seem that all your students are winners!  What is your secret? There are three essential things to create my students to become artists. First, they have to like me – that means I try to make them like the flute and come to the lesson very happy. Second, I must give them opportunity to improve – all the chances I can give such as regional or national competitions, annual studio recital, and always prepare for improvement. It is the endless experiences of preparation that will make them succeed. Third, the environment of encouragements in the studio. Not only me encouraging the students, the students will have to learn how to encourage and congratulate each other. What are your goals personally?  Professionally? Personally, I want to be a good mother, good grandmother, and good wife. I am a very plain person! Professionally, I want to be my students’ best helper and supporter no matter if they are doing music or not for their career. What inspires you the most in life? Pope Francis. One of my favorite quotes from him is: “Life can survive only because of the generosity of other lives.” What has been your greatest challenge? Six years ago, I started my annual Young Artist Recital (separate from the studio recital) featuring very, very talented musicians around the world so I can make my students to attend concerts. Students hardly come to the concerts these days! This year, the 7th Young Artist Recital will feature internationally renowned young flutists, Yubeen Kim, who is now the Principal Flute of Berlin Konzerhauser Orchestra. Sponsoring these concert series myself is very challenging and I hope this will be successful continuously. Who were your music mentors? and what did you learn from them? Samuel Baron. He came to Korea when I was the member of the KBS Symphony Orchestra and Seoul Wind Quintet. He offered full scholarship to study in US and sponsor through Albert Weatherly Flutes. Because I admire his generous personality as performer and teacher, I would like to become a mentor like him. Can you give us 5 quirky, secret, fun, (don't think too much about this) hobbies or passions? Singing. I started music when I was 5...

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Tips for Smarter Social Media Commenting. By Rachel Hacker

Posted by on Jul 1, 2017 in Articles, Blog, Essays, Featured, Issues, July 2017 | 1 comment

Tips for Smarter Social Media Commenting.  By Rachel Hacker

The Flute View has written about social media use on many occasions. Each of us who write for the magazine have benefited from interacting with a daily network of flutists and musicians from all over the world.  Blunders with people from the digital world are likely, if not inevitable. After a recent negative experience with a stranger on social media, I’ve decided to write a guide for commenting on the posts of others. It’s one thing to post an inappropriate status or photo to your own page, but it’s a different situation to say something inappropriate to another person, in a setting that is equally virtual and public. There is at least one occasion a day where I figuratively roll my eyes at an Instagram photo, a Facebook video, or a Twitter thread from someone else. We all know a person who wears their heart on the sleeve, posts a slew of selfies (that all look the same), or complains about every situation they encounter. It is convenient to judge their post, fire off a hurtful comment. The past few months, I’ve cut down on social media use, and it has made me happier. I have learned that there are too many people on social media who hide behind their computers, and say things without thinking.   The Situation  A few weeks ago, there was a Facebook page that shared one of my old Flute View articles. I was at a baby shower at the time it was posted, so I didn’t pay attention to the post for a while. I viewed the post later that day, and saw a couple of unexpected, negative, comments under it. One of the comments got resolved, but the other one really ground my gears.  A woman that I did not know called my makeup “horrid.”  The remark did not actually offend me, but I found it completely inappropriate, given that it was on a page about flute playing. I called the woman out, without being lewd, violent, or inappropriate. Multiple other people began to take up for me, and persecute the woman. She meekly apologized, but the administrator still blocked the woman from the page. This interaction could have been entirely avoided, if only she had used better social judgement.   What you can do:   Recognize your audience:  People seem to conveniently forget that social networks are, in fact, a network. Anything said on social media can be seen by anyone else. Before getting hired at my full time job, my bosses found a way to go through my Facebook, and they aren’t even friends with me. With that said, a rude or negative comment is likely to be seen by anyone else that is also friends with, or follows, the posts of that person. If the original poster has very lax security settings, or the comment was on a forum, that comment is pretty much public content. In this instance, several thousand musicians were able to access that comment. It left a terrible first impression for many people who might have otherwise considered networking with her.     Read the comment again in your head:  Sometimes, we say something without thinking, and it is later perceived by others to be crass, rude, or pretentious.  We later look at the comment again, and...

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