Articles

Can Failure Help Success? by Barbara Siesel

Posted by on Mar 1, 2016 in Blog, Essays, Featured, Health & Wellness, Issues, Lifestyle, March 2016, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Can Failure Help Success? by Barbara Siesel

If you’ve never failed you’ve never tried anything new! Last month we spoke about the power of quitting, this month we'll speak about the power of failure to inform our progress as artists and entrepreneurs. While doing research for this article I’ve been reading about famous people who’ve failed numerous times, their failures are as great as their successes! Large failures and large successes. Let’s look at some quotes from some people who’ve achieved great success and along the way great failure as well. Here are a few of my favorite quotes about failure: “It’s fine to celebrate success but it is more important to heed the lessons of failure.” Bill Gates “Success is failure in progress.” Albert Einstein “My great concern is not whether you have failed, but whether you are content with you failure.” Abraham Lincoln “I’ve failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed.” Michael Jordan “…we don’t look backwards for very long. We keep moving forward, opening up new doors, and doing new things, because we’re curious… and curiosity keeps leading us down new paths.” Walt Disney “Failure is simply the opportunity to begin again, this time more intelligently”. Henry Ford Each of these people experienced great failures before their successes. For example, Einstein didn’t speak until he was 4 years old and didn’t read until he was 7. His grades were so poor in school that a teacher told him “you will never amount to anything”. Abraham Lincoln had almost 30 years of failure before he was elected president in 1860, including being defeated for the US Senate(twice), defeated for the nomination for Vice-President, a failed business and much more. Michael Jordan was cut from his sophomore year HS Varsity basketball team!! What do all these people and quotes have in common- what do they tell us about failure? I love the idea of failure as being an opportunity to begin again, to not be content with your failure, that success is failure in progress, that failing a lot is why we succeed! Most of us have a fear of failure, but maybe, just maybe, failure is one of the ways that we accomplish success. What we learn, what we risk, and the deep understanding of the world that can come from experiencing failure are what makes us more open, more compassionate and more able to withstand the difficulties inherent in our artistic and entrepreneurial endeavors. So on the day that you reach rock bottom, the day that you lose that audition, your new business fails, your entrepreneurial idea is laughed out of the investor meeting, your 100 grant proposals of your new flutrepreneur endeavor are turned down, think--- this failure is the beginning of my success! Think, “I welcome this failure because now I know I’m going to succeed! Many of us have experienced these things, and we at The Flute View would love to hear and share your empowering...

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A Glissando Headjoint Primer. by Melissa Keeling

Posted by on Mar 1, 2016 in Articles, Education, Featured, Issues, March 2016, New Products, Uncategorized | 0 comments

A Glissando Headjoint Primer. by Melissa Keeling

The Glissando Headjoint expands the expressivity, flexibility, and timbral possibilities of the Boehm flute. The culmination of many decades of work by Robert Dick, it has been commercially available for over a decade. Beyond playing glissandi, there are many potential benefits for your overall flute playing: increased aural awareness, greater flexibility of intonation, and a slew of new timbres and harmonies. HOW DOES IT WORK? The Glissando Headjoint works by using a telescoping tube to lengthen the instrument. The headjoint is in “home position” when the tube is slid in completely (where it functions as a regular headjoint); when slid all the way out, it is at “full extension.” Attached near the lip plate are two metal wings, which rest on the player’s cheeks to allow the headjoint to change length. Players should gently bend the wings to fit comfortably (slightly touching the cheeks, but not squeezing them). The range of the glissando varies between a major second to a major third, depending on the pitch. Alternate fingerings are sometimes required to produce a smooth glissando from home position to full extension. Some pitches, particularly in the third octave, will “flip” to another harmonic before the headjoint reaches full extension. BENEFITS FOR TRADITIONAL FLUTE PLAYING Like many other contemporary flute techniques (such as singing, harmonics, and whistle tones), playing the Glissando Headjoint has benefits for traditional playing. The Glissando Headjoint’s flexible intonation forces the player to develop a higher sensitivity to pitch, a sensitivity that carries over even when playing on a regular headjoint. To improve intonation, a few weeks of mindful work with the headjoint should improve the player’s ability to discern small differences in pitch. Fine aural skills are highly cultivated by string players who navigate on a fretless fingerboard and brass players who must discriminate between narrow partials. These skills are often underdeveloped in flutists, who can simply (and sometimes, mindlessly) finger the given pitch. However, the Glissando Headjoint forces the player to have an acute awareness of pitch. Because of this, it is important to spend time practicing the Glissando Headjoint without a tuner. NOTATION The letters “I” (in) and “o” (out) indicate home position and full extension in musical notation, respectively. A fraction indicates how far to extend the headjoint for partial extensions (“-½” represents halfway out). A straight line between two notes, coupled with an arrow between I or o to show the direction the headjoint is moving, indicates a glissando between those notes. For clarity, this article will use two staves: the top shows the sounding pitches, while the bottom shows the fingered note (using a diamond note-head) and headjoint position (I, o, -½). If the headjoint is in home position for a substantial period, the bottom staff is blank. BASIC GLISSANDO HEADJOINT TECHNIQUE Short glissandi and bends can already be played on a traditional open-hole Boehm flute without a Glissando Headjoint by sliding the finger off the hole of a key while keeping the ring depressed. This technique is used frequently in contemporary flute repertoire (see the opening of Dick’s Fish Are Jumping). However, this method of bending notes does not always produce smooth motion, and is impossible in some cases (for example, there is no hole to vent on the C key, or for those playing a flute with closed-hole keys). Fortunately, this is the strength of the...

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My Time With The Hare Krishna Tree. by Rachel Hacker

Posted by on Mar 1, 2016 in Essays, Featured, Flute in the City, Issues, Lifestyle, March 2016 | 0 comments

My Time With The Hare Krishna Tree. by Rachel Hacker

In December of 2015, I had graduated with my Master's in Music, from New York University. In order to save money, I chose to leave New York, until I made my next life plan. I was in the process of applying for my Doctorate. I would be moving back to my hometown, in suburban Ohio. Though accepting this starkly contrasting future was difficult, my present life would be hard to let go. By the time I had graduated NYU, my life had begun to feel “established.” I was dating a wonderful man, living in a beautiful Brooklyn apartment, and had made friends with all kinds of great people in the NYC music community. However, I would soon be boarding a bus to Ohio, and the NYC lifestyle I had grown to love would be put on hiatus. Moving back to Ohio was not going to be easy for me. I needed to find peace with the bittersweet situation, and I knew the solution. Days before returning to Ohio, I set out for an afternoon in the East Village of Manhattan. I stopped by my favorite bagel shop, and Tompkins Square Park. I visit this park every few weeks, as if it were a religious pilgrimage. In fact, this park did contain a religious icon- the Hare Krishna Tree. I selected an arbitrary bench and sat down by the Tree, whilst trying to ignore the freezing temperatures. Tompkins Square Park is located far enough away from the Subway, so that most tourists don’t know to come, here. Until around 15 years ago, this area was considered one of the most dangerous neighborhoods in Manhattan, as it was littered with gang violence and heroin needles. However, today’s observations reveal a much more tame crowd. To my left sat a sleeping homeless man with a battered duffel bag. To my right sat an old man with a cane. Several feet down, a wealthily dressed woman talked on her cell phone. Once I had settled into my bench, and became accustomed to the weather, I reflected upon all of the memories related to this tree. The Hare Krishna Tree was the origin of a small, but mighty, religious movement.  The International Society for Krishna Consciousness (ISKCON) began their teachings in America under this tree. In the year 1965, a religious figurehead named A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada began chanting under the Hare Krishna Tree. It is hard to believe that the unassuming tree I was looking at could have experienced such a profound event. There are plenty of other “famous” trees in Manhattan, but this particular tree is affiliated to numerous life lessons I have learned. Through the years, ISKCON has attracted a wide variety of devotees, varying in socioeconomic status, nationality, and previous religious beliefs. Two of the most well known ISKCON followers were George Harrison and John Lennon. Harrison was a particularly devout follower, who devoted most of his post-Beatles music career to composing songs about Krishna, and wrote instrumentals influenced by Carnatic traditions. Members of ISKCON will state with pride that George Harrison used to chant under the Hare Krishna Tree. I have a book about Harrison and Lennon’s religious beliefs, called “Chant and be Happy.” Religious experiences can take an individual into the depths of their mind. I discovered through ISKCON that...

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The LeFreque. By Shivhan Dohse

Posted by on Feb 1, 2016 in Articles, Essays, Featured, February 2016, Issues, New Products | 0 comments

The LeFreque.  By Shivhan Dohse

LefreQue has recently become a familiar term not only for flutists, but for musicians across the board. This new and exciting development for wind instruments, invented by Dutch flutist and saxophonist Hans Kuijt, has redefined the possibilities our instruments are capable of producing. The term lefreQue may now be commonplace, but knowing what they are and why we would want to attach this small metal object to our instruments may be a different story. I know What is a LefreQue? and What exactly does it do? were the first few questions I had upon learning about them.   In short, the LefreQue is a sound bridge that acts as a guide to allow the frequencies of our tone to pass through the instrument without having to change speeds. Since our instrument has three parts, there are two locations that can interfere with how fast the fundamental and the overtones of our sound will travel through the tube. Basically, when the tone travels through a tube that has multiple parts, the fundamental will not reach the end of the tube. In addition, the speed of the travel will be slower while the overtones will travel at yet another, slower speed. If the overtones are traveling slower than the fundamental, they will not reach the same distance and therefore, the pitch will be affected. If our instrument was made out of one tube, and the frequencies would not have to travel through multiple connections, the fundamental and the overtones would then travel at the same speed and therefore the pitch would not be affected because they would reach the same distance at the same time. The LefreQue sound bridge connects the multiple parts of the flute in a way that does not disrupt the frequencies and allows them to pass through the instrument at the same speed. This is why the sound bridge was named, ‘The LefreQue’, to represent the frequencies that can pass freely through the sound bridge without getting disrupted.   As a player, you will not have to make as many corrections with the intonation, so you will be able to focus more on the interpretation of the music rather than constant manipulation of where to place the pitch. As a result of having less things to focus on, performances and practice can be much freer in terms of expression and creativity. I think as a musician, this is always our ultimate goal. A lefreQue is not to be confused with ‘auto-tune’, however. One still needs to put in the time to learn the skill and art of playing their instrument, however, they will find they will not have to manipulate as much (and receive superior results) because the instrument will be able to play with all frequencies traveling with the proper speed.   In addition to the added stability with intonation, the instrument will also have increased projection. This does not mean that a lefreQue simply makes you play louder, but because the wavelengths and frequencies are not disturbed, it may seem louder because it will give more of a surround-sound feel. The reason for this is because in wind instruments that use lefreQue, the tone that you produce is carried through to the end of the tube and therefore, the tone will be exactly the same...

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Is There Value In Quitting? By Barbara Siesel.

Posted by on Feb 1, 2016 in Articles, Entrepreneurship, Essays, Featured, February 2016, Issues | 2 comments

Is There Value In Quitting?  By Barbara Siesel.

At various times in our lives we all ask ourselves the question, “Should I quit?” Since childhood, we’ve been trained to equate quitting with failure, but is quitting failure? Is quitting always a bad thing to do? Let’s look at a few scenarios from my own life. In 2003, I was teaching flute at Colby College in Maine and running the Storm King Music Festival as its’ Artistic Director. I was feeling a little burnt out, but mostly I was concerned about the troubles I felt classical music was suffering from: lack of audience, lack of music education and lack of main stream appreciation. And in my own work, I was a bit unfulfilled. Storm King had accomplished a lot of its goals: asking and answering some questions about new music and new technology and generally pioneering in the new music revolution. In order to take it to the next level, I needed to raise a lot more money, which I wasn’t sure I wanted to do. I was also concerned that my college students were coming in without a lot of cultural background and I started to wonder if there was a way to help remedy this problem. Additionally, after spending 20 years teaching aspiring flutists, I felt that I wanted to spend more time performing and less time teaching. I also became curious about being an entrepreneur, and started thinking about what it would be like to have a product to sell, without relying on non-profit fundraising.   Was there something I could do too? Was there something I SHOULD do? Did I have the time to do anything new at all? And what would it be? I mean, it would mean quitting everything I was doing!! What about all the “sunk costs," or the amount of time, energy, money and emotion that I spent doing the work I had done up until this point? That was a big argument against quitting. But… maybe there was another way to think about it? I could consider what other opportunities and/or what I could do with my life that might bring greater happiness, purpose, and money, or be of more service if I didn’t think about my “sunk costs” and thought about new opportunity instead. I had to think long and hard: Would it be a failure for me to quit my teaching job and shut down the festival? Or would new opportunities open for me that would let me feel like I was having an impact? I finally made the decision to bring classical music to children, melding my years of teaching and performing interdisciplinary work with new skills (that I had to learn) and that included acting, improvising and creating and selling products that can help children appreciate and learn music. I resigned from Colby College and closed down The Storm King Music Festival and in 2004, The Green Golly Project was born! It’s been an exciting and sometimes challenging adventure and sometimes I have looked back, but overall I think quitting was a good idea.   So if you’re wondering about quitting something that you’ve invested your heart and soul into, ask yourself these questions: Am I only staying in this job, career, business etc. because of all that I have already invested in it in...

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What is Flute Crate? by Fluterscooter

Posted by on Feb 1, 2016 in Articles, Entrepreneurship, Essays, Featured, February 2016, Issues, New Products | 0 comments

What is Flute Crate?  by Fluterscooter

How many of you have heard of or subscribe to a monthly subscription box such as Birchbox, Barkbox, or Kawaiibox?  I'm guessing a large percentage of you!  So, being the flutrepreneur I am, I was searching for a new business idea since my Fluterscooter bag workload has gotten much easier due to my recent distributorship with JL Smith.  One day at Windworks Studio in Philadelphia, I saw how much their cats enjoyed their monthly Kitnipbox, and I thought: wouldn't flutists enjoy a flute themed subscription box? After some brainstorming and help from my colleague/flute enthusiast Belinda Brouette, I decided to launch www.flutecrate.com in December, right before Christmas. Each box always contains a new piece of flute music from a living composer and a new flute recording.  Last month, I featured composer Joseph Hallman's "Transfigured Carols" and flutist Meerenai Shim's "Pheromone" album.  There are so many flutrepreneurs these days, and I am featuring them as well.  From products like Tracy Harris' Flute Finery flute key jewelry, to Viviana Guzman's FluteQueen lipgloss, there is something all flutists will enjoy!  I think of FluteCrate as a way to support my fellow flutrepreneurs and new composers to flutists who might not know about them.  It is the newest trend in marketing new products in the non-flute world, so I figured: why not give it a try in the flute world? Check it out for yourself at...

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Flute Roomies: 5 Lessons Learned Living With Flutists. By Mara Miller

Posted by on Feb 1, 2016 in Articles, Essays, Featured, February 2016, Issues | 1 comment

Flute Roomies: 5 Lessons Learned Living With Flutists.  By Mara Miller

So, this past year, I joined the inaugural Robert Dick Studio in NYC 2015. The lessons I learned from Robert were remarkable (and meant for a separate article), but several of the most important nuggets of knowledge I received in New York City were unexpectedly given from my roommates: August and Eliza. The Studio runs from September through December, so that was four blissful months . . . of living in a one-bedroom apartment with two other flutists. Now, you’re probably thinking this anecdote is going south from here. This was no MTV’s The Real World: Flute Frenzy. I’m sure all of you readers of The Flute View are aware of the negative stereotypes flutists have acquired over time in the music world: catty, snobby, ever-overachieving, super competitive (well, the last two might be sort of true, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing)! However, I couldn’t have asked for two better roommates and we are far from stereotypical flutists in a lot of ways. August, Eliza, and I are no masochists; we’re just frugal flutists who made a decision to cut costs while living in one of the most expensive cities in the world. Since all three of us were students in the Studio program, it was important that we each got enough time to practice each day. We allotted a nine-hour chunk (9am-6pm) and rotated each hour as our designated practice times. There are not a lot of instances in which one would be placed in this sort of roommate situation so I’ve compiled a short list of concepts that really resonated with me while living with them: 1) Confidence – You can guess that at first, it was VERY awkward practicing in the same room with people who, sometimes consciously and sometimes sub-consciously, were listening to your every note. The first time I practiced while my roommates were at home, I couldn’t get away from thoughts like, “What do they think of my tone?” or “Am I even good enough to be here?” I can speak for all three of us that it took a few days of adjustment to get over our insecurities. After that brief period of vacillation, I (and my roomies) were able to practice without the looming thoughts of crippling self-doubt in the back of our minds. Honestly, being forced into that somewhat extreme circumstance allowed me to gain the confidence to play in front of literally anyone without reservations. 2) Refresh Your Warm Ups – My allotted hours of practice were 10am, 1pm, and 4pm. The first week, I would begin my 10am session with chromatic long tones . . . EVERY. SINGLE. DAY. Not only did that get super boring for me to listen to and hinder my focus, but I’m sure it was also just as boring for my roommates to hear! Now, I’m not saying flutists shouldn’t warm up with chromatic long tones. If that’s an area one may need to address, then perhaps a week-long long-tone boot camp is just what the doctor ordered. However, I realized that I was only beginning with long-tones out of habit, not necessity. After studying with Robert for a while, he opened my eyes to the concept that I shouldn’t begin my warm up the same way every day. Sometimes, I...

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Freshman Again. By Sarah Dworjan

Posted by on Feb 1, 2016 in Articles, Essays, Featured, February 2016, Issues | 0 comments

Freshman Again.  By Sarah Dworjan

Like most eighteen-year-olds who think they know everything, I had absolutely no idea what I was getting myself into when I stumbled into my freshman year at The College of Saint Rose. I’m not trying to say that the experience has been unpleasant; I just mean that looking back, I definitely had no idea what I was doing. Throughout the years, I hadn’t done much to prepare myself, so my first private flute lesson took place in my first week of being a music education major. Early on in college, I developed the defense mechanism of assuming everything was more difficult than it actually was. I was known for hanging outside the band room before rehearsal because I assumed it was locked, only to realize that I had to push the door instead of pull. Likewise in class, I had disproportionate struggles to answer the simple questions (What’s the parallel major of G-flat minor?) because I assumed they were all tricks. I just figured out last week what “stringendo” means, and I still have no idea what a flute’s cork actually does - I just know how to tell when it’s broken. So in the general scheme of musical and flute-related knowledge, I may be somewhat at a disadvantage. Granted that isn’t necessarily a bad thing: my total cluelessness renders each small success earth-shatteringly profound, so I never truly lack motivation. Aside from that, though, I’m glad I approached music the way that I did. Never having private lessons in high school allowed me to find my own sound independently, sculpting it into something that felt natural. Having private instruction now is helping me to refine and redefine (and re-redefine and re-re-redefine ad infinitum) what I had already developed. Sure, there are ten times in every private lesson when I have no idea what I’m doing, but I’m figuring that out as I go. I think every freshman music major experiences this to some extent, because all the theoretical preparation that money can buy really can’t prepare you for what’s ahead. No lesson teacher can catch every mistake, and no masterclass can unveil the one transcendental secret to music. The only way to move forward is to surrender yourself to every new experience that you can, accepting that there will always be things you didn’t expect. I underestimated the stresses of living away from my home for the first time, spending my days breathing life into a metal pipe and calling it music, but I also underestimated the joys. Like I said before, my life has become sustained by the beauty of the small successes I am (somewhat miraculously) able to achieve. Sure, some of my discoveries were just frustrating - I mean, how was I really supposed to know that my thumbs were in the wrong place for the past eight years that I played the flute? But the only way to learn is to take even these small concerns seriously. The vulnerability of being a freshman again in this brave new collegiate world has given me both profound frustrations and amazing insights that I never knew. I’m sight reading my life along with my music. How exciting is...

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5 Contemporary Flutists to Watch in 2016 by Amanda Cook

Posted by on Jan 2, 2016 in Articles, Essays, Featured, Issues, January 2016 | 0 comments

5 Contemporary Flutists to Watch in 2016 by Amanda Cook

As Associate Editor for the contemporary classical music blog I CARE IF YOU LISTEN and a DMA flute candidate at West Virginia University, I often find myself in the unique position of having a finger on the pulse of several disparate worlds. In order to kick off the new year, I'd like to recognize five outstanding individuals who represent a synthesis of my two areas of expertise: flute and contemporary classical music. Not only did these individuals have an incredible 2015, but they also have exciting projects lined up for the coming year. My five contemporary flutists to watch in 2016 are Claire Chase, Lindsey Goodman, Nathalie Joachim, Meerenai Shim, and Alex Sopp.     Claire Chase Claire Chase might be a supernatural being, but we should all consider ourselves lucky to be living in the same age as her creative genius. Her many accomplishments include founding the International Contemporary Ensemble in 2001, receiving a 2012 MacArthur Fellowship, and being awarded the 2015 American Composers Forum Champion of New Music Award. In 2015, major performances included Morton Feldman’s five-hour For Philip Guston on a sunrise concert at the Ojai Music Festival and the premiere of a new flute concerto by Dai Fujikura in Japan. Much of the beauty of her work comes from her willingness to place herself in extreme situations that force us as observers to redefine the boundaries of an artist. Perhaps her most ambitious undertaking is Density 2036: a 22-year commissioning project, part iii of which was performed in October 2015 at The Kitchen in NYC. The goal of Density 2036 is to commission an entirely new body of repertoire for solo flute in anticipation of the centenary of Edgard Varèse’s seminal Density 21.5 (1936). Chase plans to present the cumulative works from this project as a 24-hour marathon in 2036. Things to look forward to in 2016: Density 2036: part iv, a celebration of Pierre Boulez’s 90th birthday in Paris with Pascal Gallois, and a collaboration with Peter Sellars and Kaija Saariaho at the 2016 Ojai Music Festival.   Lindsey Goodman If there is one thing that is for certain, it is that Lindsey Goodman is always on the go. She is principal flute of the West Virginia Symphony Orchestra, solo flutist of the Pittsburgh New Music Ensemble, one-third of ASS3MBLY, and flute faculty at West Virginia State University and Marietta College. In 2015, performance highlights included concerto appearances with the West Virginia Symphony Orchestra (Mozart Concert in D Major) and the Northwestern University Chamber Orchestra (Cynthia Folio Winds of Change), singing Pierrot Lunaire (did I mention she is also an accomplished vocalist?), and the New York City debut of University of Pittsburgh's Music on the Edge at Subculture. In her copious amounts of spare time, Goodman has also managed to record two full-length albums: ASS3MBLY's debut album, featuring the music of Joseph Schwantner and commissioned works by John Allemeier, Ty Alan Emerson, and Randall Woolf on Albany Records and her own debut solo album reach through the sky, featuring commissions for singing electroacoustic flutist by Grant Cooper, Rob Deemer, Gilda Lyons, Jeffrey Nytch, Judith Shatin, and Erich Stem on New Dynamic Records. Things to look forward to in 2016: reach through the sky album release, ASS3MBLY album release, and collaborations with composers Randalf Woolf, Matthew Jackfert, Linda Kernohan, Elainie Lillios, and Gilda Lyons.  ...

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Entrepreneurship: Are you asking the right questions? By Barbara Siesel

Posted by on Jan 2, 2016 in Articles, Entrepreneurship, Essays, Featured, Issues, January 2016 | 0 comments

Entrepreneurship: Are you asking the right questions? By Barbara Siesel

"What's the problem?" Well that sounds a bit confrontational…but it’s not exactly what I mean.  Many of us flutetrepreneurs are attracted to becoming entrepreneurs because we see a problem in the flute world or the music world in general that we want to help solve. Big questions for us include: the future of classical music in the US, the incredible shrinking audience, the problems facing music education in the public schools, and fundraising with waning interest from millennial philanthropists. Smaller problems include: how to create the best beginner flute, flute method book, or best flute school and many, many more. It’s hard to think about some of these problems, and we often follow the popular media, blogs, or discussion groups as we search for answers that we can agree with. The pundits have lots of explanations for some of the big problems-- like, lack of funding for music education has led to plunging interest in classical music for several generations. Or that  classical music is outdated and not that "American," so our shifting demographic isn’t interested. Or that millennial philanthropists are interested in metrics-- meaning "what is the exact measurable effect that a donation will have?" These seem like difficult problems, and the problem you may be trying to solve may be difficult, as well. Maybe you have to ask a different question or find a way to re-define the problem-- perhaps ask, "what is the core of the problem?" For example, is the problem for classical music the music itself, the audience, the schools, the parents, the funders, the way music is funded, the marketing, the framing of the marketing, the lack of interactivity… I could go on, but you get the picture. Try to ask yourself what is the core of the problem, and see if you can look at the problem in a different way. Additionally, we in the classical music and flute world often accept limits on what is possible in our world, such as no audiences, not a lot of money for music, too hard of a problem to solve, the big corporations are in control, etc. For example, many of us flutists have tricked ourselves into playing a difficult tempo in a piece by aiming for a very fast metronome mark, and then falling back to the required tempo, which then seems easy in comparison to the speedy goal we aimed for. Why not apply this concept which we use all the time to our flutrepreneur problem? If we don’t think about the limits and barriers, we might be able to figure out a solution that others may have missed. Some barriers are really artificial (some are real), and the imagination and creativity that you’ve developed as musicians can really affect interesting change and solve some of those big and small problems that you are thinking about. Happy New Year, and may your ideas come to fruition in the coming...

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