Articles

Art for Social Change by Barbara Siesel

Posted by on Mar 1, 2017 in Articles, Entrepreneurship, Essays, Featured, Issues, March 2017 | 0 comments

Art for Social Change by Barbara Siesel

“In the face of Trump, many artists report feelings of paralysis. Should they carry on as before, nobly defying the ruination of public discourse? Or seize on a new mission, abandoning the illusion of aesthetic autonomy?” Alex Ross Above is a quote by Alex Ross in his article in the New Yorker entitled “Making Art in a Time of Rage.” He reminds us that classical musicians respond to adversity in a variety of ways, choosing to either go deeper into creating beauty as Leonard Bernstein so famously said shortly after the assassination of JFK. Here is an excerpt from the statement that Bernstein made at a fundraising event at Madison Square Garden: “This will be our reply to violence: to make music more intensely, more beautifully, more devotedly than ever before.” Or perhaps you are in a state of mind that you can’t create art until you’ve won the fight or cleared the space. Ross quotes Gwendolyn Brooks’s 1949 poem “First Fight Then Fiddle”: “. . . Carry hate In front of you and harmony behind. Be deaf to music and to beauty blind. Win war. Rise bloody, maybe not too late For having first to civilize a space Wherein to play your violin with grace.” But perhaps we want to consider these thoughts deeply and then choose to pursue a third approach. We can continue to create music more deeply and beautifully than before, do our very best, and then attach a social change addition to how the work is presented, funded or performed. We can keep growing our voices as artists and contribute to winning the fight as well! Here’s an example of a project that I think does just that. Fluterscooter has just released a new CD, and I asked her a few questions about the social impact of the new album: Barbara: Congratulations on your new CD- can you tell us about it?  What inspired you to make this recording? Fluter: I had always wanted to do a meditation album, but after the election, I was inspired to actually get into the studio and create it!  It is designed for meditation and healing, as we all need it in these trying times.  It was also inspired by working with the sacred teacher plants for the past year and a half, and it is currently played in healing ceremonies.  I composed, produced, and played most of the instruments on the whole album!  I finished it in a week and a half, too (lol). Barbara: Why did you choose the ACLU? https://www.aclu.org Fluter: I feel like that's a no-brainer.  People's rights are being threatened daily, whether it be their religion, gender, sexual orientation, or color of their skin.  Since the election, I've donated to them on a monthly basis, but I want to be able to help more, so I'm donating 25% of profits from this album to ACLU.  Also, I'm donating 100% of profits from my track "Standing Rock" to the WaterKeeper's Alliance (www.waterkeeper.org) Barbara: What advice would you give to other flutists who want to pursue an art for social change project? Fluter: Do it.  And do it NOW.  Music is a great way to help the organizations that need it so much right now! If you have an “Art for Social Change” project that you...

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Articulation. By Dr. Cate Hummel

Posted by on Feb 1, 2017 in Articles, Education, Featured, February 2017, Issues | 1 comment

Articulation. By Dr. Cate Hummel

If you say about someone that they are articulate, you mean that they are good at making their ideas clear. From this we can infer that “articulation” in music also means that it is a tool that makes musical ideas clear. Another concept we hear a lot about when we go to music school is that the basic elements of music are repetition and contrast. Articulation plays a big role in creating the perception of both repetition and contrast for our listeners. It then stands to reason that our job as interpreters and performers is to define the articulation as clearly as possible. With good articulation we can define the character of a piece, communicate style and emotion. How can we use articulation as an essential element in our musical toolbox? First we have to really understand the nature of articulation. Is it just tonguing; single, double, triple tonguing? Tonguing is certainly one of the first things we learn playing the flute, along with shaping the aperture and making a sound. According to Thomas Nyfenger, tonguing was merely the finishing touch to articulation, but not the actual articulation itself. The actual articulation is based on using the breath, and shaping and directing the air stream at the blowing edge. The tongue merely provides a clear ictus to the note being articulated. One of my favorite Nyfenger quips is that, “tonguing is the anti-tone.” Articulation is how we define style, character and phrasing. There are two basic kinds of blowing, legato and staccato, and as many variations of each as you have imagination. These two types of articulation have to be cultivated separately in order to clearly understand what is required to produce them. For legato blowing, there is no better exercise than Moyse long tones (as in De la Sonorité and Trevor Wye’s Practice Book 1) in groups of two, three, four and five notes in either direction, descending to spread the richness into the low register or ascending to learn to keep the sound open and full of life. Pay particular attention to space between the notes, the continuity of the air as your fingers move. There is a physical and visceral feeling, pushing from your core, when the notes are well connected. Practice pushing through larger intervals as well, both up and down. Also note the difference in how it feels for upward versus downward intervals. Play long, lyrical melodies from the literature. Some of my favorites are the opening of the slow movement of the Ibert Concerto, the slow movement of the Poulenc Sonata, the opening of the Büsser Prelude and Scherzo, the first melody of the slow movement in the Beethoven Violin Concerto, Fauré Pavane, etc. Staccato blowing is more overtly athletic and requires a different kind of effort than legato blowing. The first question to ask yourself is if you can play staccato without tonguing. Can you control how you shape and direct the air stream so the ictus is as clear as humanly possible without using the tongue for definition? You really have to study your focus, placement and the forcefulness of the puff of air you blow. If you can do this, then try the same thing with just a little bit of tongue for definition. The granddaddy of all staccato blowing...

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In Defense of the Practice Room Selfie. By Laken Emerson

Posted by on Feb 1, 2017 in Articles, Essays, Featured, February 2017, Flute Fashion, Issues, Lifestyle | 0 comments

In Defense of the Practice Room Selfie.  By Laken Emerson

Yes, the practice room mirror selfie is shameless. Here’s why you should do it. The consumer-performer relationship has endured — and survived — many struggles over the last several decades; with modern technology, we are more than a hop and a skip away from formal concert settings of yore. This has been great for the modern music student: instead of travelling to concerts by the artist you want to emulate or scouring library vinyl collections for music history class, the universe of music performance is a simple Google search away. The world is at our fingertips (and in our pockets and our desktops and our backpacks). With the growth of internet resources comes the growth of social media, our greatest ally and worst enemy rolled into one app of your choice. As the internet has evolved, so has musicians’ use for it: now we not only view other performers’ videos and musical examples, but we can post our own. Contrary to popular belief, this is also great for the modern music student. No one should be afraid to use these platforms, students and aspiring professionals included. The platform that has reigned supreme in the musical universe (in my musical universe) is Instagram. Instagram is a photo and video sharing app that now supports live video and a 24-hour Story feature. The best part — the Explore section uses information from your posts, follows, and hashtags to curate a page full of other users you may like. After my first post with #flute, this page exploded with other musician profiles. Game changer.     At first, I was wary of finding some 14-year-old conservatory student who surpassed me on every level and pushed me into the classic Social Media Comparison Syndrome: Musician Edition. The last thing I needed was more reason to feel inadequate. I also didn’t want to post mirror selfies every time I pulled out my flute, admittedly because I made fun of the gym rats who did the same thing. I considered myself too “down to earth” to flex my musician muscles for social media, when I see now it was really a lack of self confidence that kept me from posting anything musical. Though I wasn’t posting about playing, I was following my favorite accounts that did. I also follow illustrators, writers, yogis, and dozens of other artists who posted their equivalent to gym selfies daily: the things they dedicated their time to becoming better at, while they’re doing them. They’re not bragging about how much they can lift — they’re finding accountability and community with people all over the world, by use of one app. At good long last, it occurred to me — why can’t musicians do this too? Spoiler: they do. All the time. And they’re good at it. There are performers and students and teachers all under one digital roof, giving mini recitals and lessons right in the palm of your hand — and supporting one another to boot. It’s all because of social media. I repeat, this is also great for the modern music student. Not only should we be following and supporting the really awesome flutists on Instagram, but we should be contributing to the conversation. Music is a community, not a competition — something we students are the quickest...

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How I Ended Up Working in the Music Industry. By Paula Savastano

Posted by on Feb 1, 2017 in Articles, Entrepreneurship, Essays, Featured, February 2017, Issues | 0 comments

How I Ended Up Working in the Music Industry.  By Paula Savastano

Specializing in Copyright, Licensing, Royalties and Publishing, Paula Savastano has worked in the music business for more than 25 year. As a classically trained musician, she began her career in Opera Management, but quickly made the switch to the popular music realm. She has worked in administrative management and intellectual property departments for several notable companies including Broadcast Music, Inc. (BMI), Spirit Music Group, Rykomusic, Cherry Lane Music, Musical Heritage Society and Turn up the Music. For several years, Paula’s knowledge and experience has been sought after by publishers and record companies to assist them with audits, royalties and copyright issues. After significant and continued demand, she started her own company, SSA Music, which provides financial, legal, auditing, licensing and royalty consulting services to a diverse clientele ranging from independent musicians to major music publishers and record companies. In recent years, SSA Music has expanded to offer catalog pitching and placement for a select clientele. SSA Music Catalog has grown to include over 1500 titles from nearly all genres of music, ranging from classical, jazz, pop, rock, alternative, rockabilly and varying cross-over genres. The majority of the SSA Music catalog is available as one-stop/all-in licensing, and has instrumental mixes and stems, as well as full tracks available. In the recent past, SSA Music has directed the focus of its business to pairing music supervisors with quality music to fit their musical needs. Paula has been an active speaker at educational conferences and universities around the country for more than 10 year. She has held the position of Adjunct Professor in the Music Industry Departments at Drexel University and William Paterson University. She is active member of National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences (NARAS), National Association for Recording Industry Professionals (NARIP), Association of Independent Music Publishers (AIMP), Women in Music (WIM) and Sigma Alpha Iota (Professional Music Fraternity). She is also an active musician, performing in the greater New York and Philadelphia metropolitan areas, as a freelance flautist.   I was a flautist – there wasn’t anything else in the world that I related to as much as playing my flute. Other careers were offered up to me including teaching and business school. I had no desire to teach in a classroom or work in the business field. Mean kids, bullies, and stuffy offices did not appeal to me. Music business programs were not well-known in the 1980s, and careers were usually fallen into by accident. I didn’t even know there was a possibility to work in the industry but not play or teach. I chose to attend Boston Conservatory, but had to work my way through school with odd jobs in the school cafeteria and music library, and worked an evening job of usher at Boston Symphony Hall. I also sought out any opportunity to work with or play music. I studied hard and my playing advanced significantly. I was on my way to the playing career I hoped to have. Then came my senior year; I was having issues with painful hands and elbows, which was limiting my practice time. But with all the work, and striving to graduate that year, I ignored it. That is until I slipped on the ice and fractured my elbow. Along with that diagnosis, came the diagnosis of severe tendonitis in...

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Musicians for Arts Advocacy. By Barbara Siesel

Posted by on Feb 1, 2017 in Articles, Entrepreneurship, Essays, Featured, February 2017, Issues | 0 comments

Musicians for Arts Advocacy.  By Barbara Siesel

Last Saturday I participated in the Woman’s March, joining a sister march in NYC. It’s estimated that 400,000 women attended the NYC march and scientists estimate that between 3-4 million people marched worldwide.  It shows that people really care about what is happening around women’s issues and human rights.  The experience was inspiring and uplifting and gave me a day of hope for our future, for everyone’s future, all races, religions, sexual orientations and economic class.  Certainly all that people power can be a force for change in the world as we begin to figure out what to do next. You may be wondering what this has to do with art for social change, or your entrepreneurial, flutist self, but I believe it has everything to do with it. Musicians' voices are on the front line with the power to create social change through our music and our advocacy for music.  Dear readers, we may not all have the same political opinions these days but there are a few things happening that will affect all of our musical voices and we need to find ways to keep our voices heard no matter what happens. In the next weeks Congress may vote to eliminate the NEA, NEH and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.  NEA or NEH support is often the badge of approval needed for a project to gather the additional support it needs to become viable and PBS is the place where we go to hear stories and see programs not dependent on commercial support.  All three of these agencies have somewhat independent voices (I say independent because I remember the culture wars of the 1990’s), that support artists and writers and help get new work out to the public.  For a miniscule investment of .004 % of our national budget, millions of Americans all over the US, in cities and towns, large and small, benefit from this investment. For the latest news on the future of the NEA, read this blog by Culture Grrl (Lee Rosenbaum).  She makes an important point – we must make our voices heard before something happens.  Here are two petitions that you can sign: on the White House website and on Change.org.  The White House site has only a small number of signers so get there soon!!    And, take a look at Leonard Jacob's article: “56 State Arts Agencies Face the Death of the NEA” published in the Clyde Fitch Report. This article can help you stay up to date on all the internal and external discussions about what artists, art’s organizations and art’s advocacy groups can do.  Jacobs makes a strong point about this being a time to be visible and vocal in your opposition to cutting these federal agencies. He agrees to disagree with Pam Breaux, CEO of National Assembly of State Arts Agencies (NASAA) on the subject, as he feels that arts organizations aren’t responding with enough strength and vehemence. That without a strong response we will remain without power in the US and will perhaps lose the agencies that we have today.  Remember support for the arts is a bi-partisan issue, the arts support economic growth and affect people in rural and urban America alike.  We as artists have a responsibility to join together and make our voices heard, whether through our art or through our arts advocacy.  The Women’s March shows us that we can take action. Now let’s transfer that energy to the arts sector and see if we can create a positive result for artists in America.  Next month – how our...

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Can Entrepreneurship Effect Political Change?

Posted by on May 1, 2016 in Entrepreneurship, Essays, Featured, May 2016 | 0 comments

Can Entrepreneurship Effect Political Change?

Well, it’s election time. We are being bombarded by politicians, pundits, and the public all talking about the problems facing America today and how they are going to fix it, or not fix it!!!  So I thought it was time for an article about how our entrepreneurial projects can effect political and social change.  Let’s say that you are upset by the lack of funding for live performances or the lack of music education in the schools. Maybe you are worried about the refugee crisis or the lack of opportunities for inner city children. In today’s election cycle, education, the refugee crisis, and lack of opportunity for the poor are among the many talking points of people running for office and for all of us listening to them.  It’s exciting for entrepreneurs to realize that they are working to effect change on some of the big issues confronting our society. Perhaps we should re-frame our descriptions of our projects to include how we as artists are dedicated to--and are having impact on--some of the great issues confronting our country. You might be saying: "I’m a flutist, a musician, an artist... how can my project have an impact? Classical music hardly registers at all these days. I don’t know what you’re talking about!!!" Here’s what I think, and I’d love to have your thoughts, too. The more artists talk about the impact of their work (especially their entrepreneurial social impact projects) on communities nationally and internationally, the more seriously artists will be taken and the better they will be able to leverage funding and community support. If we want to have an impact on the policies of our country, we need to be seen and heard and not think of ourselves as outside the mainstream as artists so often see themselves. I’m calling on us to wake up and make our voices heard so that the beautiful and profound work that musical entrepreneurs are doing to effect change can have a chance to be effective. Next month we’ll discuss social impact investing and what that means for...

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Music of Hermeto Pascoal by Rebecca Kleinmann

Posted by on Apr 1, 2016 in April 2016, Articles, Essays, Featured | 0 comments

Music of Hermeto Pascoal by Rebecca Kleinmann

The Adventure and Expressions of Brazil’s Music of Hermeto Pascoal by Rebecca Kleinmann Picture a man who looks like a wizard with long white hair, a huge frizzy white beard and pale skin, writing music symbols directly on a wall with a marker, his nose practically touching the wall due to his blurry vision. He hums to himself as he works steadily, without referencing a musical instrument and without pause, as if writing a stream-of-consciousness letter. The notes and chord symbols almost look like a child’s scribbles, but when musicians gather around to interpret his creation, a gorgeous melody with rich harmony emerges! This is one of the scenes from my trip to Brazil at Chacará Riacho Doce near Ubatuba, where I had the privilege of spending time with this wizard, Hermeto Pascoal and musicians inspired by him. Hermeto Pascoal is one of my favorite composers, improvisers and inspirations of all time and across all genres of music. As an Albino born in Alagoas, Brazil (1936), he was unable to play or work outdoors, so spent his childhood indoors or under the shade of a tree practicing the accordion his father gave him. He became a multi-instrumentalist, composer, arranger and improviser. When I say multi-instrumentalist, I mean it! I have seen this genius play piano, flutes, drums, accordion, a glass of water, a bottle cap, and turn an audience into a musical instrument. This is a man who has chased pigs around on stage. You name it: Hermeto will turn it into music. I can see why the musicality and compositions streaming from Hermeto’s creativity captivated Jazz greats including Miles Davis. Hermeto performed with Miles and recorded on his album “Live Evil” in 1971, but rejected his offer to move to the US and join his band. Hermeto’s melodies have a child-like, playful quality while harmonies whiz by with a complexity that could have stumped Wagner. The rhythms are rooted in diverse genres of Brazilian music including baião, choro, samba, and extending into odd meter expressions of Brazil’s cultural music. Hermeto’s improvisations are compositions themselves. When he improvises on any instrument, the music takes a journey into completely unexpected territory. His knowledge and technique are mind-blowing, and he uses them in support of his wild expression. It always seems as if he is telling a story through his solo. I have been fascinated with Hermeto’s music for years, so when I heard of an opportunity to spend a week at a workshop with him in Brazil, I did my best to get there. I sold a flute, arranged a fund-raising concert, sent off for a new Visa, and bought my ticket. The travel itself was an adventure! After getting stranded in Panama City, missing the only daily bus from Rio to my destination, and jumping on series of packed, sweaty local buses, I finally arrived at the workshop’s remote location outside of Ubatuba just in time for dinner and happy to be greeted by many familiar faces. … It strikes me that Hermeto is at once genius, humble, hilarious, and kind. He is positive and encouraging in a way that brings out the best in musicians, throwing his hands up in the air and cheering when someone takes a solo. There are no expressive markings in his music because...

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21st Century Connections

Posted by on Apr 1, 2016 in April 2016, Articles, Education, Featured | 0 comments

21st Century Connections

21st Century Connections by Lindsay Bryden The 21st century has seen many exciting developments in its short 15 years. The new generation of flutists has grown up with extended techniques, modern music is at a pivotal time between experimental and contemporary classical, and conservatories are filled to the brim with outstanding pedagogues closely connected to those who propelled the legacy of the flute in the mid-20th century. However, the greatest achievement of the 21st century is the advancement of technology and the worldwide web. Through social media, musicians have direct access to audiences, colleagues and teachers. It is easy to advertise performances and self-promote through the online sharing of recordings and compositions. With the right marketing, people can get a multitude of followers on websites like Twitter or Facebook. This means thousands of potential listeners who can share these promotions through their own accounts. Online networking also gives the ability to message friends and colleagues directly to organise rehearsals, initiate collaborations, and contact composers to commission pieces, adding to the repertoire. Social media isn’t simply for aspiring professionals; this platform is key in the lives of famous performers, orchestras, professors, composers and conductors. These websites are most commonly used for posting recordings and videos, advertising concerts, and sharing information on masterclasses, courses and teaching philosophies.  YouTube is the most well known website besides Google. Since it was first activated in February 2005, it has attracted millions of hits per year. Professors frequently tell students to go on YouTube to listen to repertoire they are learning, and is the go-to source for watching orchestral performances when preparing for auditions. It is used for promoting personal recordings and seeking criticism from the online community. Videos of masterclasses or instructional material on new techniques are readily available, allowing flutists to learn even when not undertaking studies. Applications such as Skype and FaceTime, created for keeping relationshiops alive across the globe, are useful to the modern-day flutist. They enable connecting with potential ensemble partners, job interviews for teaching positions, and – when coupled with the right microphomne – orchestra auditions. Consultation lessons with professors at conservatories of interest can now happen trans-continentally without paying an exorbitant amount for flights. With online sources like the International Music Score Library Project (IMSLP), flutists have free access to sheet music that are out of copyright. Getting scores for courses, auditions and orchestral work through sites like this means flutists can properly prepare for any situation. IMSLP is great for practicing repertoire that is difficult to purchase in the flesh. Other children of modern technology are online listening libraries like Naxos and Spotify. These resources are perfect for comparing recordings, ideas on interpretation, tempo indications and sound quality. This helps when learning new pieces and deciding what kind of repertoire to explore next. Like YouTube, these are used for listening to full orchestrations in preparation of auditions or rehearsals and listening to the recordings of pedagogues. Search engines like Google are used daily in all facets of life, whether it be new recipes or looking for information on the flute. It is used for researching masterclasses, job openings in orchestras and ensembles, teaching positions and college auditions. Flutists are now able to better prepare for auditions by finding information about orchestra members, conductors, repertoire preferences, and performance and...

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The Lifting Flutist, By Sarah Howard

Posted by on Mar 1, 2016 in Essays, Health & Wellness, Interviews, Issues, Lifestyle, March 2016, Uncategorized | 1 comment

The Lifting Flutist, By Sarah Howard

Who is the lifting flutist? That’s a tough question to answer, considering the birth of this concept happened naturally by me just goofing off in the gym. Here’s the short of it. I’m Sarah Howard, and I’m a flutist in the U.S. Air Force. I happen to have quite the passion for fitness; particularly Olympic lifting and metabolic conditioning. I studied flute performance at Shenandoah Conservatory and The University of Tennessee before I won my job with the Air Force. When my video started picking up views a few weeks ago I was completely overwhelmed. I certainly believe that when the world hands you a microphone, you should speak into it. Maybe, just maybe, people will listen. So, I came up with this crazy concept of “The Lifting Flutist.” Now, let it be known, I definitely didn’t want this to be some weird musical sideshow. I truly believe there is direct correlation to being physically fit and being a solid performer. I also know that I want to tell people my story, so here it is… Five years ago, this month, my mother passed away from cancer. It was an incredibly stressful time. Not too long after that I, naturally, fell into a deep depression. Everything in my life was a struggle. My depression took its toll on my friendships, my marriage, my playing; pretty much every aspect of my life was withering away. I felt empty. There was still a little spark in me that kept me going. I’ve always been a fighter, but this fighter was at the lowest low. I knew I had to do something. So, one day I walked into this little storefront in Warner Robins, GA. There was a makeshift sign on the door that said “Crossfit,” and it seriously looked a little sketchy. I walked to the back and there was a lady sitting there. I asked her, “Please, can you help me? I think I want to try Crossfit.” She took me through what I thought was a workout. It actually turned out to be just the warm-up, and then my addiction began. It may be cliché to say, but I believe that fitness healed me. I would go through some workouts and literally cry hysterically. Not because they were so difficult, but because I was purging emotions and negative energy. I would think about my mom, about my life, about what I was doing as a musician, about the type of mother I was and wanted to be, just everything would come out in the gym. Then, I would leave it there. I thought I was beginning to heal. Then, I was hit with another huge blow. My marriage was falling apart and the Air Force band where I was working was being decommissioned. I would have to move to another state, start working at a new band, adjust to single parenting, and get divorced simultaneously. I was overwhelmed. Completely. Through fitness, I had developed a group of supporters who truly held me up through that time, but when I moved I was alone again. After my move I literally did not step foot in the gym for six months. I was just going through the motions of life. I would take my son to school, show up at work, pretend to smile, all the while dealing with loads of self-loathing and a sense of failure. I still hadn’t let myself mourn my mother. I was on overload. I was literally...

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The Magic of Wind: Bringing Musical Artistry to the Dominican Republic, by Allison Loggins-Hull

Posted by on Mar 1, 2016 in Education, Entrepreneurship, Featured, Issues, March 2016, Outreach, Uncategorized | 0 comments

The Magic of Wind: Bringing Musical Artistry to the Dominican Republic, by Allison Loggins-Hull

I’m thrilled to be a part of this year’s Festival Clarinetísimo in The Dominican Republic. Since 2009, Festival Clarinetísimo has invited prominent clarinetists to give lectures and master classes to students of the National Conservatory of Music and the Elementary School of Music "Elila Mena.” In an effort to branch out and integrate other members of the woodwind family, they have invited me to perform and conduct a variety of classes. From the organizer, Darleny Gonzalez: "We plan for each festival to have a distinct air, its own character. In particular, the presence of Allison Loggins-Hull and her flute at VIII Festival Clarinetisimo would represent an interesting mixture of novelty, different perspectives shared from one woodwind instrument to another, and chamber work through flute-clarinet duets. Mrs. Loggins-Hull’s career and musical projects will surely enrich and inspire the Dominican community of clarinetists and flutists, alike. We are enthused to receive Allison this upcoming March." The Dominican Republic is a developing country and has very limited resources, especially when it comes to the arts and music. Having visited the country in the past, I have fond memories of the wonderful warmth and beautiful beaches, but also, striking recollections of the extreme poverty that the majority of Dominicans live in. More than a third of the Dominican Republic lives on less than $1.25 a day and only 30% of children finish primary school. Half of the country does not have access to clean water, and over half of the country does not have sanitary toilets. Knowing this, one can only imagine the limited access Dominicans have to music education and the performing arts. Participating in this festival allows me to share music and knowledge with a population who would not normally have access to such experiences. It is my hope that my involvement will mark the beginning of the Festival’s continued expansion and ability to serve more and more Dominicans for years to come. The National Conservatory of Music in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic is a Government dependent institution which counts on limited resources for large-scale events like these. For this reason, they are relying on individuals and organizations that take an interest in this project and wish to support it. Please consider making a contribution to support the festival and help bring distinguished artists from around the globe. For more information on the festival, please visit:...

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