Articles

Music of Hermeto Pascoal by Rebecca Kleinmann

Posted by on Apr 1, 2016 in April 2016, Articles, Essays, Featured | 0 comments

Music of Hermeto Pascoal by Rebecca Kleinmann

The Adventure and Expressions of Brazil’s Music of Hermeto Pascoal by Rebecca Kleinmann Picture a man who looks like a wizard with long white hair, a huge frizzy white beard and pale skin, writing music symbols directly on a wall with a marker, his nose practically touching the wall due to his blurry vision. He hums to himself as he works steadily, without referencing a musical instrument and without pause, as if writing a stream-of-consciousness letter. The notes and chord symbols almost look like a child’s scribbles, but when musicians gather around to interpret his creation, a gorgeous melody with rich harmony emerges! This is one of the scenes from my trip to Brazil at Chacará Riacho Doce near Ubatuba, where I had the privilege of spending time with this wizard, Hermeto Pascoal and musicians inspired by him. Hermeto Pascoal is one of my favorite composers, improvisers and inspirations of all time and across all genres of music. As an Albino born in Alagoas, Brazil (1936), he was unable to play or work outdoors, so spent his childhood indoors or under the shade of a tree practicing the accordion his father gave him. He became a multi-instrumentalist, composer, arranger and improviser. When I say multi-instrumentalist, I mean it! I have seen this genius play piano, flutes, drums, accordion, a glass of water, a bottle cap, and turn an audience into a musical instrument. This is a man who has chased pigs around on stage. You name it: Hermeto will turn it into music. I can see why the musicality and compositions streaming from Hermeto’s creativity captivated Jazz greats including Miles Davis. Hermeto performed with Miles and recorded on his album “Live Evil” in 1971, but rejected his offer to move to the US and join his band. Hermeto’s melodies have a child-like, playful quality while harmonies whiz by with a complexity that could have stumped Wagner. The rhythms are rooted in diverse genres of Brazilian music including baião, choro, samba, and extending into odd meter expressions of Brazil’s cultural music. Hermeto’s improvisations are compositions themselves. When he improvises on any instrument, the music takes a journey into completely unexpected territory. His knowledge and technique are mind-blowing, and he uses them in support of his wild expression. It always seems as if he is telling a story through his solo. I have been fascinated with Hermeto’s music for years, so when I heard of an opportunity to spend a week at a workshop with him in Brazil, I did my best to get there. I sold a flute, arranged a fund-raising concert, sent off for a new Visa, and bought my ticket. The travel itself was an adventure! After getting stranded in Panama City, missing the only daily bus from Rio to my destination, and jumping on series of packed, sweaty local buses, I finally arrived at the workshop’s remote location outside of Ubatuba just in time for dinner and happy to be greeted by many familiar faces. … It strikes me that Hermeto is at once genius, humble, hilarious, and kind. He is positive and encouraging in a way that brings out the best in musicians, throwing his hands up in the air and cheering when someone takes a solo. There are no expressive markings in his music because...

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21st Century Connections

Posted by on Apr 1, 2016 in April 2016, Articles, Education, Featured | 0 comments

21st Century Connections

21st Century Connections by Lindsay Bryden The 21st century has seen many exciting developments in its short 15 years. The new generation of flutists has grown up with extended techniques, modern music is at a pivotal time between experimental and contemporary classical, and conservatories are filled to the brim with outstanding pedagogues closely connected to those who propelled the legacy of the flute in the mid-20th century. However, the greatest achievement of the 21st century is the advancement of technology and the worldwide web. Through social media, musicians have direct access to audiences, colleagues and teachers. It is easy to advertise performances and self-promote through the online sharing of recordings and compositions. With the right marketing, people can get a multitude of followers on websites like Twitter or Facebook. This means thousands of potential listeners who can share these promotions through their own accounts. Online networking also gives the ability to message friends and colleagues directly to organise rehearsals, initiate collaborations, and contact composers to commission pieces, adding to the repertoire. Social media isn’t simply for aspiring professionals; this platform is key in the lives of famous performers, orchestras, professors, composers and conductors. These websites are most commonly used for posting recordings and videos, advertising concerts, and sharing information on masterclasses, courses and teaching philosophies.  YouTube is the most well known website besides Google. Since it was first activated in February 2005, it has attracted millions of hits per year. Professors frequently tell students to go on YouTube to listen to repertoire they are learning, and is the go-to source for watching orchestral performances when preparing for auditions. It is used for promoting personal recordings and seeking criticism from the online community. Videos of masterclasses or instructional material on new techniques are readily available, allowing flutists to learn even when not undertaking studies. Applications such as Skype and FaceTime, created for keeping relationshiops alive across the globe, are useful to the modern-day flutist. They enable connecting with potential ensemble partners, job interviews for teaching positions, and – when coupled with the right microphomne – orchestra auditions. Consultation lessons with professors at conservatories of interest can now happen trans-continentally without paying an exorbitant amount for flights. With online sources like the International Music Score Library Project (IMSLP), flutists have free access to sheet music that are out of copyright. Getting scores for courses, auditions and orchestral work through sites like this means flutists can properly prepare for any situation. IMSLP is great for practicing repertoire that is difficult to purchase in the flesh. Other children of modern technology are online listening libraries like Naxos and Spotify. These resources are perfect for comparing recordings, ideas on interpretation, tempo indications and sound quality. This helps when learning new pieces and deciding what kind of repertoire to explore next. Like YouTube, these are used for listening to full orchestrations in preparation of auditions or rehearsals and listening to the recordings of pedagogues. Search engines like Google are used daily in all facets of life, whether it be new recipes or looking for information on the flute. It is used for researching masterclasses, job openings in orchestras and ensembles, teaching positions and college auditions. Flutists are now able to better prepare for auditions by finding information about orchestra members, conductors, repertoire preferences, and performance and...

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The Lifting Flutist, By Sarah Howard

Posted by on Mar 1, 2016 in Essays, Health & Wellness, Interviews, Issues, Lifestyle, March 2016, Uncategorized | 1 comment

The Lifting Flutist, By Sarah Howard

Who is the lifting flutist? That’s a tough question to answer, considering the birth of this concept happened naturally by me just goofing off in the gym. Here’s the short of it. I’m Sarah Howard, and I’m a flutist in the U.S. Air Force. I happen to have quite the passion for fitness; particularly Olympic lifting and metabolic conditioning. I studied flute performance at Shenandoah Conservatory and The University of Tennessee before I won my job with the Air Force. When my video started picking up views a few weeks ago I was completely overwhelmed. I certainly believe that when the world hands you a microphone, you should speak into it. Maybe, just maybe, people will listen. So, I came up with this crazy concept of “The Lifting Flutist.” Now, let it be known, I definitely didn’t want this to be some weird musical sideshow. I truly believe there is direct correlation to being physically fit and being a solid performer. I also know that I want to tell people my story, so here it is… Five years ago, this month, my mother passed away from cancer. It was an incredibly stressful time. Not too long after that I, naturally, fell into a deep depression. Everything in my life was a struggle. My depression took its toll on my friendships, my marriage, my playing; pretty much every aspect of my life was withering away. I felt empty. There was still a little spark in me that kept me going. I’ve always been a fighter, but this fighter was at the lowest low. I knew I had to do something. So, one day I walked into this little storefront in Warner Robins, GA. There was a makeshift sign on the door that said “Crossfit,” and it seriously looked a little sketchy. I walked to the back and there was a lady sitting there. I asked her, “Please, can you help me? I think I want to try Crossfit.” She took me through what I thought was a workout. It actually turned out to be just the warm-up, and then my addiction began. It may be cliché to say, but I believe that fitness healed me. I would go through some workouts and literally cry hysterically. Not because they were so difficult, but because I was purging emotions and negative energy. I would think about my mom, about my life, about what I was doing as a musician, about the type of mother I was and wanted to be, just everything would come out in the gym. Then, I would leave it there. I thought I was beginning to heal. Then, I was hit with another huge blow. My marriage was falling apart and the Air Force band where I was working was being decommissioned. I would have to move to another state, start working at a new band, adjust to single parenting, and get divorced simultaneously. I was overwhelmed. Completely. Through fitness, I had developed a group of supporters who truly held me up through that time, but when I moved I was alone again. After my move I literally did not step foot in the gym for six months. I was just going through the motions of life. I would take my son to school, show up at work, pretend to smile, all the while dealing with loads of self-loathing and a sense of failure. I still hadn’t let myself mourn my mother. I was on overload. I was literally...

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The Magic of Wind: Bringing Musical Artistry to the Dominican Republic, by Allison Loggins-Hull

Posted by on Mar 1, 2016 in Education, Entrepreneurship, Featured, Issues, March 2016, Outreach, Uncategorized | 0 comments

The Magic of Wind: Bringing Musical Artistry to the Dominican Republic, by Allison Loggins-Hull

I’m thrilled to be a part of this year’s Festival Clarinetísimo in The Dominican Republic. Since 2009, Festival Clarinetísimo has invited prominent clarinetists to give lectures and master classes to students of the National Conservatory of Music and the Elementary School of Music "Elila Mena.” In an effort to branch out and integrate other members of the woodwind family, they have invited me to perform and conduct a variety of classes. From the organizer, Darleny Gonzalez: "We plan for each festival to have a distinct air, its own character. In particular, the presence of Allison Loggins-Hull and her flute at VIII Festival Clarinetisimo would represent an interesting mixture of novelty, different perspectives shared from one woodwind instrument to another, and chamber work through flute-clarinet duets. Mrs. Loggins-Hull’s career and musical projects will surely enrich and inspire the Dominican community of clarinetists and flutists, alike. We are enthused to receive Allison this upcoming March." The Dominican Republic is a developing country and has very limited resources, especially when it comes to the arts and music. Having visited the country in the past, I have fond memories of the wonderful warmth and beautiful beaches, but also, striking recollections of the extreme poverty that the majority of Dominicans live in. More than a third of the Dominican Republic lives on less than $1.25 a day and only 30% of children finish primary school. Half of the country does not have access to clean water, and over half of the country does not have sanitary toilets. Knowing this, one can only imagine the limited access Dominicans have to music education and the performing arts. Participating in this festival allows me to share music and knowledge with a population who would not normally have access to such experiences. It is my hope that my involvement will mark the beginning of the Festival’s continued expansion and ability to serve more and more Dominicans for years to come. The National Conservatory of Music in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic is a Government dependent institution which counts on limited resources for large-scale events like these. For this reason, they are relying on individuals and organizations that take an interest in this project and wish to support it. Please consider making a contribution to support the festival and help bring distinguished artists from around the globe. For more information on the festival, please visit:...

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Can Failure Help Success? by Barbara Siesel

Posted by on Mar 1, 2016 in Blog, Essays, Featured, Health & Wellness, Issues, Lifestyle, March 2016, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Can Failure Help Success? by Barbara Siesel

If you’ve never failed you’ve never tried anything new! Last month we spoke about the power of quitting, this month we'll speak about the power of failure to inform our progress as artists and entrepreneurs. While doing research for this article I’ve been reading about famous people who’ve failed numerous times, their failures are as great as their successes! Large failures and large successes. Let’s look at some quotes from some people who’ve achieved great success and along the way great failure as well. Here are a few of my favorite quotes about failure: “It’s fine to celebrate success but it is more important to heed the lessons of failure.” Bill Gates “Success is failure in progress.” Albert Einstein “My great concern is not whether you have failed, but whether you are content with you failure.” Abraham Lincoln “I’ve failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed.” Michael Jordan “…we don’t look backwards for very long. We keep moving forward, opening up new doors, and doing new things, because we’re curious… and curiosity keeps leading us down new paths.” Walt Disney “Failure is simply the opportunity to begin again, this time more intelligently”. Henry Ford Each of these people experienced great failures before their successes. For example, Einstein didn’t speak until he was 4 years old and didn’t read until he was 7. His grades were so poor in school that a teacher told him “you will never amount to anything”. Abraham Lincoln had almost 30 years of failure before he was elected president in 1860, including being defeated for the US Senate(twice), defeated for the nomination for Vice-President, a failed business and much more. Michael Jordan was cut from his sophomore year HS Varsity basketball team!! What do all these people and quotes have in common- what do they tell us about failure? I love the idea of failure as being an opportunity to begin again, to not be content with your failure, that success is failure in progress, that failing a lot is why we succeed! Most of us have a fear of failure, but maybe, just maybe, failure is one of the ways that we accomplish success. What we learn, what we risk, and the deep understanding of the world that can come from experiencing failure are what makes us more open, more compassionate and more able to withstand the difficulties inherent in our artistic and entrepreneurial endeavors. So on the day that you reach rock bottom, the day that you lose that audition, your new business fails, your entrepreneurial idea is laughed out of the investor meeting, your 100 grant proposals of your new flutrepreneur endeavor are turned down, think--- this failure is the beginning of my success! Think, “I welcome this failure because now I know I’m going to succeed! Many of us have experienced these things, and we at The Flute View would love to hear and share your empowering...

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A Glissando Headjoint Primer. by Melissa Keeling

Posted by on Mar 1, 2016 in Articles, Education, Featured, Issues, March 2016, New Products, Uncategorized | 0 comments

A Glissando Headjoint Primer. by Melissa Keeling

The Glissando Headjoint expands the expressivity, flexibility, and timbral possibilities of the Boehm flute. The culmination of many decades of work by Robert Dick, it has been commercially available for over a decade. Beyond playing glissandi, there are many potential benefits for your overall flute playing: increased aural awareness, greater flexibility of intonation, and a slew of new timbres and harmonies. HOW DOES IT WORK? The Glissando Headjoint works by using a telescoping tube to lengthen the instrument. The headjoint is in “home position” when the tube is slid in completely (where it functions as a regular headjoint); when slid all the way out, it is at “full extension.” Attached near the lip plate are two metal wings, which rest on the player’s cheeks to allow the headjoint to change length. Players should gently bend the wings to fit comfortably (slightly touching the cheeks, but not squeezing them). The range of the glissando varies between a major second to a major third, depending on the pitch. Alternate fingerings are sometimes required to produce a smooth glissando from home position to full extension. Some pitches, particularly in the third octave, will “flip” to another harmonic before the headjoint reaches full extension. BENEFITS FOR TRADITIONAL FLUTE PLAYING Like many other contemporary flute techniques (such as singing, harmonics, and whistle tones), playing the Glissando Headjoint has benefits for traditional playing. The Glissando Headjoint’s flexible intonation forces the player to develop a higher sensitivity to pitch, a sensitivity that carries over even when playing on a regular headjoint. To improve intonation, a few weeks of mindful work with the headjoint should improve the player’s ability to discern small differences in pitch. Fine aural skills are highly cultivated by string players who navigate on a fretless fingerboard and brass players who must discriminate between narrow partials. These skills are often underdeveloped in flutists, who can simply (and sometimes, mindlessly) finger the given pitch. However, the Glissando Headjoint forces the player to have an acute awareness of pitch. Because of this, it is important to spend time practicing the Glissando Headjoint without a tuner. NOTATION The letters “I” (in) and “o” (out) indicate home position and full extension in musical notation, respectively. A fraction indicates how far to extend the headjoint for partial extensions (“-½” represents halfway out). A straight line between two notes, coupled with an arrow between I or o to show the direction the headjoint is moving, indicates a glissando between those notes. For clarity, this article will use two staves: the top shows the sounding pitches, while the bottom shows the fingered note (using a diamond note-head) and headjoint position (I, o, -½). If the headjoint is in home position for a substantial period, the bottom staff is blank. BASIC GLISSANDO HEADJOINT TECHNIQUE Short glissandi and bends can already be played on a traditional open-hole Boehm flute without a Glissando Headjoint by sliding the finger off the hole of a key while keeping the ring depressed. This technique is used frequently in contemporary flute repertoire (see the opening of Dick’s Fish Are Jumping). However, this method of bending notes does not always produce smooth motion, and is impossible in some cases (for example, there is no hole to vent on the C key, or for those playing a flute with closed-hole keys). Fortunately, this is the strength of the...

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My Time With The Hare Krishna Tree. by Rachel Hacker

Posted by on Mar 1, 2016 in Essays, Featured, Flute in the City, Issues, Lifestyle, March 2016 | 0 comments

My Time With The Hare Krishna Tree. by Rachel Hacker

In December of 2015, I had graduated with my Master's in Music, from New York University. In order to save money, I chose to leave New York, until I made my next life plan. I was in the process of applying for my Doctorate. I would be moving back to my hometown, in suburban Ohio. Though accepting this starkly contrasting future was difficult, my present life would be hard to let go. By the time I had graduated NYU, my life had begun to feel “established.” I was dating a wonderful man, living in a beautiful Brooklyn apartment, and had made friends with all kinds of great people in the NYC music community. However, I would soon be boarding a bus to Ohio, and the NYC lifestyle I had grown to love would be put on hiatus. Moving back to Ohio was not going to be easy for me. I needed to find peace with the bittersweet situation, and I knew the solution. Days before returning to Ohio, I set out for an afternoon in the East Village of Manhattan. I stopped by my favorite bagel shop, and Tompkins Square Park. I visit this park every few weeks, as if it were a religious pilgrimage. In fact, this park did contain a religious icon- the Hare Krishna Tree. I selected an arbitrary bench and sat down by the Tree, whilst trying to ignore the freezing temperatures. Tompkins Square Park is located far enough away from the Subway, so that most tourists don’t know to come, here. Until around 15 years ago, this area was considered one of the most dangerous neighborhoods in Manhattan, as it was littered with gang violence and heroin needles. However, today’s observations reveal a much more tame crowd. To my left sat a sleeping homeless man with a battered duffel bag. To my right sat an old man with a cane. Several feet down, a wealthily dressed woman talked on her cell phone. Once I had settled into my bench, and became accustomed to the weather, I reflected upon all of the memories related to this tree. The Hare Krishna Tree was the origin of a small, but mighty, religious movement.  The International Society for Krishna Consciousness (ISKCON) began their teachings in America under this tree. In the year 1965, a religious figurehead named A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada began chanting under the Hare Krishna Tree. It is hard to believe that the unassuming tree I was looking at could have experienced such a profound event. There are plenty of other “famous” trees in Manhattan, but this particular tree is affiliated to numerous life lessons I have learned. Through the years, ISKCON has attracted a wide variety of devotees, varying in socioeconomic status, nationality, and previous religious beliefs. Two of the most well known ISKCON followers were George Harrison and John Lennon. Harrison was a particularly devout follower, who devoted most of his post-Beatles music career to composing songs about Krishna, and wrote instrumentals influenced by Carnatic traditions. Members of ISKCON will state with pride that George Harrison used to chant under the Hare Krishna Tree. I have a book about Harrison and Lennon’s religious beliefs, called “Chant and be Happy.” Religious experiences can take an individual into the depths of their mind. I discovered through ISKCON that...

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The LeFreque. By Shivhan Dohse

Posted by on Feb 1, 2016 in Articles, Essays, Featured, February 2016, Issues, New Products | 0 comments

The LeFreque.  By Shivhan Dohse

LefreQue has recently become a familiar term not only for flutists, but for musicians across the board. This new and exciting development for wind instruments, invented by Dutch flutist and saxophonist Hans Kuijt, has redefined the possibilities our instruments are capable of producing. The term lefreQue may now be commonplace, but knowing what they are and why we would want to attach this small metal object to our instruments may be a different story. I know What is a LefreQue? and What exactly does it do? were the first few questions I had upon learning about them.   In short, the LefreQue is a sound bridge that acts as a guide to allow the frequencies of our tone to pass through the instrument without having to change speeds. Since our instrument has three parts, there are two locations that can interfere with how fast the fundamental and the overtones of our sound will travel through the tube. Basically, when the tone travels through a tube that has multiple parts, the fundamental will not reach the end of the tube. In addition, the speed of the travel will be slower while the overtones will travel at yet another, slower speed. If the overtones are traveling slower than the fundamental, they will not reach the same distance and therefore, the pitch will be affected. If our instrument was made out of one tube, and the frequencies would not have to travel through multiple connections, the fundamental and the overtones would then travel at the same speed and therefore the pitch would not be affected because they would reach the same distance at the same time. The LefreQue sound bridge connects the multiple parts of the flute in a way that does not disrupt the frequencies and allows them to pass through the instrument at the same speed. This is why the sound bridge was named, ‘The LefreQue’, to represent the frequencies that can pass freely through the sound bridge without getting disrupted.   As a player, you will not have to make as many corrections with the intonation, so you will be able to focus more on the interpretation of the music rather than constant manipulation of where to place the pitch. As a result of having less things to focus on, performances and practice can be much freer in terms of expression and creativity. I think as a musician, this is always our ultimate goal. A lefreQue is not to be confused with ‘auto-tune’, however. One still needs to put in the time to learn the skill and art of playing their instrument, however, they will find they will not have to manipulate as much (and receive superior results) because the instrument will be able to play with all frequencies traveling with the proper speed.   In addition to the added stability with intonation, the instrument will also have increased projection. This does not mean that a lefreQue simply makes you play louder, but because the wavelengths and frequencies are not disturbed, it may seem louder because it will give more of a surround-sound feel. The reason for this is because in wind instruments that use lefreQue, the tone that you produce is carried through to the end of the tube and therefore, the tone will be exactly the same...

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Is There Value In Quitting? By Barbara Siesel.

Posted by on Feb 1, 2016 in Articles, Entrepreneurship, Essays, Featured, February 2016, Issues | 2 comments

Is There Value In Quitting?  By Barbara Siesel.

At various times in our lives we all ask ourselves the question, “Should I quit?” Since childhood, we’ve been trained to equate quitting with failure, but is quitting failure? Is quitting always a bad thing to do? Let’s look at a few scenarios from my own life. In 2003, I was teaching flute at Colby College in Maine and running the Storm King Music Festival as its’ Artistic Director. I was feeling a little burnt out, but mostly I was concerned about the troubles I felt classical music was suffering from: lack of audience, lack of music education and lack of main stream appreciation. And in my own work, I was a bit unfulfilled. Storm King had accomplished a lot of its goals: asking and answering some questions about new music and new technology and generally pioneering in the new music revolution. In order to take it to the next level, I needed to raise a lot more money, which I wasn’t sure I wanted to do. I was also concerned that my college students were coming in without a lot of cultural background and I started to wonder if there was a way to help remedy this problem. Additionally, after spending 20 years teaching aspiring flutists, I felt that I wanted to spend more time performing and less time teaching. I also became curious about being an entrepreneur, and started thinking about what it would be like to have a product to sell, without relying on non-profit fundraising.   Was there something I could do too? Was there something I SHOULD do? Did I have the time to do anything new at all? And what would it be? I mean, it would mean quitting everything I was doing!! What about all the “sunk costs," or the amount of time, energy, money and emotion that I spent doing the work I had done up until this point? That was a big argument against quitting. But… maybe there was another way to think about it? I could consider what other opportunities and/or what I could do with my life that might bring greater happiness, purpose, and money, or be of more service if I didn’t think about my “sunk costs” and thought about new opportunity instead. I had to think long and hard: Would it be a failure for me to quit my teaching job and shut down the festival? Or would new opportunities open for me that would let me feel like I was having an impact? I finally made the decision to bring classical music to children, melding my years of teaching and performing interdisciplinary work with new skills (that I had to learn) and that included acting, improvising and creating and selling products that can help children appreciate and learn music. I resigned from Colby College and closed down The Storm King Music Festival and in 2004, The Green Golly Project was born! It’s been an exciting and sometimes challenging adventure and sometimes I have looked back, but overall I think quitting was a good idea.   So if you’re wondering about quitting something that you’ve invested your heart and soul into, ask yourself these questions: Am I only staying in this job, career, business etc. because of all that I have already invested in it in...

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What is Flute Crate? by Fluterscooter

Posted by on Feb 1, 2016 in Articles, Entrepreneurship, Essays, Featured, February 2016, Issues, New Products | 0 comments

What is Flute Crate?  by Fluterscooter

How many of you have heard of or subscribe to a monthly subscription box such as Birchbox, Barkbox, or Kawaiibox?  I'm guessing a large percentage of you!  So, being the flutrepreneur I am, I was searching for a new business idea since my Fluterscooter bag workload has gotten much easier due to my recent distributorship with JL Smith.  One day at Windworks Studio in Philadelphia, I saw how much their cats enjoyed their monthly Kitnipbox, and I thought: wouldn't flutists enjoy a flute themed subscription box? After some brainstorming and help from my colleague/flute enthusiast Belinda Brouette, I decided to launch www.flutecrate.com in December, right before Christmas. Each box always contains a new piece of flute music from a living composer and a new flute recording.  Last month, I featured composer Joseph Hallman's "Transfigured Carols" and flutist Meerenai Shim's "Pheromone" album.  There are so many flutrepreneurs these days, and I am featuring them as well.  From products like Tracy Harris' Flute Finery flute key jewelry, to Viviana Guzman's FluteQueen lipgloss, there is something all flutists will enjoy!  I think of FluteCrate as a way to support my fellow flutrepreneurs and new composers to flutists who might not know about them.  It is the newest trend in marketing new products in the non-flute world, so I figured: why not give it a try in the flute world? Check it out for yourself at...

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