The Flute View Blog

NEW COLUMN: Dr. G’s Flute Horoscopes. by Rachel Taylor Geier

Posted by on Oct 1, 2017 in Blog, Dr. G's Flute Horoscopes, Featured, Issues, October 2017 | 0 comments

NEW COLUMN:  Dr. G’s Flute Horoscopes. by Rachel Taylor Geier

The big news for everybody this month is that Jupiter, planet of expansion, growth, abundance, and learning, is entering the sign of Scorpio on October 10th. This will mean different things for each sign depending on which astrological house Jupiter lands in. With the Sun also moving into Scorpio on October 22nd, there will be an added spotlight on your Jupiter placement. Something in your flute playing is about to blow up (in a good way!). The Jupiter transit will last a little over a year. You may not see abundance right away, however October marks the beginning of major growth and change in your flute life. The seeds are literally being sown in October for something new and amazing to happen in the future months. Get ready! Libra (September 23-October 22). Happy Birthday Libra!!! For the first 3 weeks of the month, the Sun will be in your sign in the 1st house of visibility and who you are in the world. You are most likely playing up a storm, hopping from performance to performance, juggling impressive solos in your band or orchestra ensembles with stunning solo and chamber recital performances that put you smack dab in the middle of the spotlight. You are the queen bee for the first 3 weeks of October! Your Jupiter is landing in the 2nd house of income on October 10th (and we are all jealous). This is a great time for you to expand your income by taking on new money-making endeavors. Jupiter may be encouraging you to learn new skills that will increase your cashflow over the next year (maybe you are learning a new instrument to increase your student base). As Venus and Mars are aligned in your 12th house of shadows and secrets for the first two weeks of the month, you may be feeling quite passionate about a project that you are working on behind the scenes. When Venus and Mars move into your 1st house on October 22nd, at the same time that the sun is shining a light on the Jupiter hanging out in your 2nd house of income, you are ready to share the money-making project you have been working on in secret with the world. Have you been working on a new CD recording that is set to launch on or around the end of October? Or maybe you are writing a book that is set to release at the end of the month. Whatever it is, you are very excited and ready to share your flute playing ideas with the world. Full Moon - October 5th in Aries in your 7th house of relationships. A creative relationship might be ending behind the scenes. Perhaps your accompanist is moving or you no longer have time to perform with a particular group. New Moon - October 19th in Libra in your 1st house, opposing Uranus. You want to break out of a rut and promote something new! You are reinventing your own definition of what it means to be a “flute player.” Scorpio (October 23-November 21).   Are you spending countless hours in the practice room these days? You may also be typing away at your computer working on an article or a book until the wee hours of the morning. This is because...

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The First Panama Flute Festival

Posted by on Sep 1, 2017 in Articles, Blog, Entrepreneurship, Essays, Featured, Issues, September 2017 | 0 comments

The First Panama Flute Festival

Dafne Guevara, Manuel Ruiz Acosta, and Valentin Martinez are the founders of APAFLUT (Asociación Panameña de Flautistas), the brand new and first flute association in Panama.   Fluterscooter was a Guest Artist of their first flute festival this summer in Panama City.  In this interview, she asks them about the festival, starting a flute association in Central America, and the flute and music scene in Panama. Explain a little about your background and how you founded APAFLUT:   Dafne: When I was studying in the USA, I saw a video of kids holding guns. The kids were barely 6 or 7 years old, and they were talking about killing people. These kids were reflecting all the hate that the older people had against society, and it was reflecting how hate can be passed down. I was thinking how sad it was for me, and that the government is not helping too much. They care about other things instead of education and culture. I used to live in one of these areas, so I know where these kids come from and what they see everyday. I said, we don’t need to wait for the government to do something; we have something beautiful. Let us use it, and take advantage of what we know, and all we know is to play the flute. We don’t have money. Manuel is also very enthusiastic, so we called and organized 40 kids and paid for pizza. One kid said he wanted to quit school, but saw what we were doing and your story, and now he will graduate and be someone. The kids said that we are their idols. After the first Panama flute “mini-festival,” we decided to create APA Flut. It’s been 113 years since anything happened with the flute here. We are the new generation. We need this! Without any money, I went back home and talked to Prof. Almarza, and he said he would support it. I went back to UNLV, and Dr. Grim was also on board. After that, I had a lot of opportunities to write projects for fellowships, and I won one fellowship through UNLV. I’d also write to friends of flute foundations and explain about the project, and I got a lot of support. Manuel: My sister is a lawyer, and she helped us with all the legal things we needed to create APA Flut in Panama. Was it difficult?   Manuel: It was VERY difficult, especially since we don’t have money, but luckily my sister helped. Valentin: We did 4 recitals to earn money to pay for the creation of the association. Dafne: We owe everything to the kids. Ever since we gave them the idea that we’re starting the flute association here, they knew we didn’t have money, but they said they still have flutes. From January until last week, the kids have been presenting recitals to get money. We sold tickets to the recitals, and advertised mostly on Facebook. Is this an ongoing flute association? What are your responsibilities until the next festival?   Dafne: Besides getting sponsors, it is to keep the kids motivated. We don’t want to give them something beautiful like this, but then have it go away. I want these kids to be someone and be inspired. So you’re really empowering these kids.   Dafne: Exactly....

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Galway Flute Festival: The Students

Posted by on Aug 1, 2017 in Articles, August 2017, Blog, Featured, Interviews, Issues | 0 comments

Galway Flute Festival: The Students

  The students of the Galway Flute Festival were not only fantastic flutists, but also great personalities! We asked them about the festival, working with Sir James Galway, their goals, inspirations, and advice they would offer to younger students.      Katy Wherry 2017 Rising Star  Amy Gillen 2017 Rising Star  Audrey Emata The Flute View Young Artist Competition Winner Lucas Martins Pedro Brazil Valerie Henning Germany, Festival Translator Albert Pae Former Rising Star, Festival Team, and technical assistant Amy Pribuluck...

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Galway Flute Festival: Reflections (Viviana Guzman)

Posted by on Aug 1, 2017 in Articles, August 2017, Blog, Featured, Issues | 0 comments

Galway Flute Festival: Reflections (Viviana Guzman)

From the moment I landed, I felt that there was something extraordinary about this festival.  The magic starts when you first set your eyes on Lake Lucerne.  Breathing the air, smelling the country fragrances, eating the marvelous salads at Stella Matutina,  are just the introduction, then it becomes even more enchanting.  After the opening concert by Sir James and Lady Jeanne, I was enthralled.  In fact, after every concert I felt myself fall deeper into the blissful spell.  Sir James and Lady Jeanne cast a magical brew that included the daily warm-up, masterclasses, workshops, interviews, more masterclasses, more interviews and nightly concerts;  combine all of this with delightful meals and short swims in the lake, and you have a perfect Fairy Tale setting for flutists. The Galway Flute Festival brings out the best of everyone, as Sir James and Lady Jeanne, the students and participants turn into a family of support and encouragement.  The evening concerts provide a delightful platform for inspiration.  The generous exhibitors donate the awards and prizes voted on by the class.  In the end, everyone feels included, supported and encouraged. This was a first-class festival from beginning to end.  Expertly run, with first-rate individuals in every post carefully selected and looked after by Sir James and Lady Jeanne Galway.  You come away feeling truly touched by the generous spirit of Sir James and Lady Jeanne Galway.  The Galway Flute Festival is a place of myth and magic, where Sir James and Lady Jeanne stand at the helm, waiving their magic wands (their flutes!), enlightening and touching all who gather to listen and learn. --Viviana...

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July 2017 PDF Download

Posted by on Jul 2, 2017 in Blog, July 2017 | 0 comments

July 2017 PDF Download

Download the PDF of The Flute View July 2017. Interviews with Lady Jeanne Galway and Dallas Flute Teacher Extraordinaire, Monica Song. Kaori Fuji Cecil shares what is new with Music Beyond. Dr. Cate Hummel shares tips on Blowing the flute! Dr. Nicole Riner shares a Commissioning Guide. Fluterscooter shares her unique marketing idea. Rachel Hacker shares Tips of Smart Social Media Posting. Barbara Siesel shares Entrepreneurial Resources. Dyan Parker, Music is the Ointment That Heals. CD Reviews of the latest from Rozalind MacPhail and Bill McBirnie. Happy Reading!  -The Flute View Team...

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Tips for Smarter Social Media Commenting. By Rachel Hacker

Posted by on Jul 1, 2017 in Articles, Blog, Essays, Featured, Issues, July 2017 | 1 comment

Tips for Smarter Social Media Commenting.  By Rachel Hacker

The Flute View has written about social media use on many occasions. Each of us who write for the magazine have benefited from interacting with a daily network of flutists and musicians from all over the world.  Blunders with people from the digital world are likely, if not inevitable. After a recent negative experience with a stranger on social media, I’ve decided to write a guide for commenting on the posts of others. It’s one thing to post an inappropriate status or photo to your own page, but it’s a different situation to say something inappropriate to another person, in a setting that is equally virtual and public. There is at least one occasion a day where I figuratively roll my eyes at an Instagram photo, a Facebook video, or a Twitter thread from someone else. We all know a person who wears their heart on the sleeve, posts a slew of selfies (that all look the same), or complains about every situation they encounter. It is convenient to judge their post, fire off a hurtful comment. The past few months, I’ve cut down on social media use, and it has made me happier. I have learned that there are too many people on social media who hide behind their computers, and say things without thinking.   The Situation  A few weeks ago, there was a Facebook page that shared one of my old Flute View articles. I was at a baby shower at the time it was posted, so I didn’t pay attention to the post for a while. I viewed the post later that day, and saw a couple of unexpected, negative, comments under it. One of the comments got resolved, but the other one really ground my gears.  A woman that I did not know called my makeup “horrid.”  The remark did not actually offend me, but I found it completely inappropriate, given that it was on a page about flute playing. I called the woman out, without being lewd, violent, or inappropriate. Multiple other people began to take up for me, and persecute the woman. She meekly apologized, but the administrator still blocked the woman from the page. This interaction could have been entirely avoided, if only she had used better social judgement.   What you can do:   Recognize your audience:  People seem to conveniently forget that social networks are, in fact, a network. Anything said on social media can be seen by anyone else. Before getting hired at my full time job, my bosses found a way to go through my Facebook, and they aren’t even friends with me. With that said, a rude or negative comment is likely to be seen by anyone else that is also friends with, or follows, the posts of that person. If the original poster has very lax security settings, or the comment was on a forum, that comment is pretty much public content. In this instance, several thousand musicians were able to access that comment. It left a terrible first impression for many people who might have otherwise considered networking with her.     Read the comment again in your head:  Sometimes, we say something without thinking, and it is later perceived by others to be crass, rude, or pretentious.  We later look at the comment again, and...

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In Memoriam: Tribute to Phil Dikeman

Posted by on Jun 1, 2017 in Blog, Featured, Issues, June 2017 | 0 comments

In Memoriam: Tribute to Phil Dikeman

Philip Dikeman, Associate Professor of Flute, was a member of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra for almost 20 years. During his tenure with the DSO, he held the position of Assistant Principal Flute, as well as Acting Principal Flute for his final two seasons. He also appeared as concerto soloist with the DSO on numerous occasions and took part in various tours to Europe, Asia, Florida, The Hollywood Bowl and Carnegie Hall. This current concert season of 2016-17, he was invited to assume the position of Acting Principal Flute with the Nashville Symphony. Dikeman attended the Oberlin College Conservatory of Music, where he studied with Robert Willoughby and received his Bachelor of Music. He received his Master of Music from the Yale School of Music, studying with Thomas Nyfenger. He was named the George Wellington Memorial Scholar for his outstanding musical and academic excellence upon completion of his degree at Yale University. Immediately after graduation, Dikeman began his professional career when he was appointed Principal Flute of the Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra, a position he held for five seasons. Prior to joining the Detroit Symphony in the fall of 1992, he played Principal Flute for a short time with the San Antonio Symphony. He has also played Guest Principal Flute with both the Minnesota Orchestra and the St. Louis Symphony, and Guest Associate Principal Flute with the Los Angeles Philharmonic. In competition, Dikeman holds the distinction of having won first prize in both the National Flute Association’s (NFA) Young Artist and Orchestral Audition Competitions. In chamber music, Dikeman was a member of the Detroit Chamber Winds & Strings for 18 seasons. His performances with DCWS included regular appearances on their subscription series, as well as various tours including Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall and Lucerne, Switzerland. He was also a featured performer for the Great Lakes Chamber Music Festival while still a member of the DSO. He has made recital and masterclass appearances throughout the United States, including Los Angeles, Boston, Chicago, Cleveland and Interlochen. Dikeman is on the faculty of the Summer Arts Camp at the Interlochen Center for the Arts. He has taught there for the last five seasons as a Valade Fellow, Instructor of Flute. In 2014, he was honored to accept the role of Program Chair for the National Flute Association's 2014 Convention held in Chicago, aptly titled "Perform, Inspire, Educate!" Also, in the spring of 2015 he traveled to Berlin with the Blair Woodwind Quintet to play a concert at the invitation of the Berlin Philharmonic Woodwind Quintet. Philip Dikeman was a close friend to many at Powell Flutes Boston.  His talent, impeccable musicianship and infectious laugh are deeply missed. In every artist's career, there are mentors who raise up their students and drive their growth.  For Philip, it was Mr. Robert Willoughby at the Oberlin College Conservatory of Music and Mr. Tom Nyfenger at Yale University.  These two great men provided the foundation for Philip's career and pedagogic philosophy.  Through their teaching, Philip gained a mastery of nuanced performance which he in turn passed on to his students. In 1998 Philip was the first place winner of the National Flute Association Young Artist Competition, seventeen years later, his student, Ramakrishnan Kumaran won first place. To honor Philip's legacy and artistry, Powell Flutes is proud to sponsor the...

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Emily Skala: Artist Interview

Posted by on Jun 1, 2017 in Blog, Featured, Interviews, Issues, June 2017 | 0 comments

Emily Skala: Artist Interview

Emily Skala has been the Principal Flutist of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra since 1988 and a faculty member of the Peabody Institute since 1989. Recent years have provided substantial opportunity for international travel to Brazil, the United Kingdom, France and Germany, to perform on tour and at music festivals worldwide: Southbank Centre’s “The Rest Is Noise” Festival (UK), Campos do Jordao Winter Festival (Brazil), and Carnegie Hall. An expert in orchestral repertoire, Ms. Skala has performed, adjudicated, taught, and commissioned new works at the National Flute Association’s annual conventions.   Can you give us 5 career highlights?   It is interesting to me to realize that when I look back on my career in a thoughtful retrospection and self-assessment, all the concerts, rehearsals, auditions, recitals, competitions, chamber music, the classes, rather bleed together and form a rolling sea of feelings and sensations that hardly distinguish themselves one from the other. They all seem to pour together and form my way of being. But just as in any ocean a creature will jump out from the deep and amaze the onlookers as they surface or fly, my special experiences stand out and can momentarily be seen more vividly than most. Your question has made me search my memory banks! Here is what I have stirred up:    1     Itzhak Perlman's compliment of my Brahms Symphony #4 solo. He loved the unforced low notes at the end! Something he never gets to hear. Validation from artists on this level is extremely meaningful. Even if it is about only one or two notes.    2     Making the semifinals of the 2014 Berlin Philharmonic Principal Flute search; being the only American flutist to achieve this; and being one of only two women to advance to this level. It was the most fun audition experience I ever had (in fact, I didn't know they could be fun)! I felt like I had truly accomplished something that day. And while I was there, I was able to listen to an afternoon rehearsal of Schubert's "Rosamunde" Overture. The orchestra was supposed to have performed that week's concert under Claudio Abbado's leadership. Sadly, Maestro Abbado had passed away four months earlier. They kept his program in tact, however, and played the Schubert without conductor as an homage to this important musician. It was Abbado's favorite piece. The richness of the sonorities that emerged from the orchestra and dedication to musical collaboration and expression among the musicians of the Berlin Philharmonic was breathtaking. I will never forget this sound. It was something I have never heard before and never expect to hear again, unless I can manage to fit more travel into my life! All the stories we hear about this orchestra are true. So if you can afford to go, you must hear the Berlin Philharmonic in the Berlin Philharmonie!    3     I cannot forget the Aspen Festival Orchestea's performance of Mahler's Symphony #3, with the late and wonderfully musical Maestro Sergiu Comissiona conducting. In this performance I worked side by side with my first great mentor and Principal Flutist of the Aspen Festival Orchestra, Albert Tipton. All this when I was just 16 years old. This week of wondrous music making confirmed my love of orchestral flute playing. I knew I was doing absolutely the right thing....

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Texas Flute Festival Overview

Posted by on Jun 1, 2017 in Articles, Blog, Featured, June 2017 | 0 comments

Texas Flute Festival Overview

The 40th Annual Texas Flute Society Flute Festival was held on May 18 to 20, 2017, in the charming town of Denton, Texas at the Texas Women's University.  This festival, which has in the past presented such flute stars as Paula Robison, Carol Wincenc, Greg Pattillo, Christina Jennings, Gary Schocker, etc presented this year three diverse and thrilling flutists, Nestor Torres, Viviana Guzman, and Timothy Hagen.   The primary focus of the Texas Flute Festival is to light a spark in the minds and hearts of young flutists by encouraging them to participate in the festival by performing, competing and attending workshops and concerts by the aforementioned virtuosos.  Judging from the high level of the performances of the students in the competitions, the Texas Flute Festival seems to be meeting their goals. The winners of this year’s  Myrna W. Brown Artist Competition were as follows: 1st Place - Drew Powell 2nd Place - Won Lee 3rd Place - Nicholas Goodwin Mehrdad Gholam also turned in a fine performance. The Donna Marie Haire Young Artist Competition Winners were as follows: 1st Place - Subin Cho 2nd Place - Yeongjae Jo Sara Hyeeum Jeong and Hannah Kim also presented notable capabilities. Link to the awards: Texas Flute Festival  President Jennifer Kirby infused the festival with a warmth and efficiency that made the event a pleasure to attend.   In fact, the whole Society Board was incredibly welcoming and helpful to the attendees and performers, true Southern hospitality.  The Guest Artists' concerts were both eclectic and riveting.   Nestor Torres included captivating original and jazz favorites by Herbie Mann, Chick Corea, Cole Porter and Harold Arlen accompanied by UNT musicians, Jose M. Aponte, drums, Christian Valdez, piano, Michael Luzecky, bass.  Viviana Guzman, accompanied by Anastasia Markina, presented works by Gary Schocker, Monti, and Piazzolla and provided a vibrant video backdrop to some of her own compositions.   The brilliant and inspiring, Timothy Hagen, also accompanied by Anastasia Markina, presented his own composition as well as works by Welcher, Schumann, Hindemith, Telemann and Hue.  The three guest artists sat on several competition panels as well as presenting Workshops and Masterclasses that were included throughout the days’ activities. The festival sponsors were the Haire Foundation, National Endowment for the Arts, Texas Commission on the Arts, Altus Flutes, Sherry Lee, Woodwind and Brasswind, Floot Fire, Brannen Brothers, Carolyn Nussbaum, Drelinger, Gemeinhardt, Jupiter, Music & Arts, Williamson Music and Yamaha. These sponsors deserve recognition for helping provide an opportunity for young flutists to be inspired and pick up tips and help them along in their musical paths.  Various Flute Choirs conducted by Shauna Kay Thompson, Felix Torres, Melissa Arthur, Julee Kim Walker, Ellen Kaner, Lisa Book, provided lovely concerts throughout the festival.  The festival ended with a Gala Performance featuring the three Guest Artists, Torres, Guzman and Hagen, and culminated in a delightful and innovative play/performance by UTA’s Maverick Flute...

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Winners of The Flute View Young Artists Competition

Posted by on May 18, 2017 in Blog, Featured, May 2017 | 0 comments

Winners of The Flute View Young Artists Competition

THE JUDGES:   Francesca Arnone   Jasmine Choi   Tara Helen O'Connor       CONTRATULATIONS TO ALL! Tara wrote:   After a lovely discussion via conference call from Korea-NY- Florida, the final results are....   THE WINNERS:   FIRST PLACE - AUDREY EMATA Altus Handmade Flutes 1st Prize $1,000   SECOND PLACE - BRIDGET PEI Wm. S. Haynes Co. 2nd Prize $500 (Videos have been deleted)   THIRD PLACE - JOANNA KIM 2t Flute Academy 3rd Prize $250   Our Winner for Audience Favorite is JENNIFER HUANG Galway Flute Academy including a Skype lesson with Sir James Galway, Audience Favorite Prize $250 (based on number of YouTube Video views)   View All the Contestants HERE   THANK YOU TO ALL OUR CONTESTANTS & THE JUDGES!...

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