CD Reviews

Robert Dick The Galilean Moons Album Review

Posted by on Feb 1, 2017 in CD Reviews, Featured, February 2017 | 0 comments

Robert Dick The Galilean Moons Album Review

Robert Dick has recently released his new CD, Galilean Moons. This intriguing groundbreaking album is a result of an extraordinary collaboration between two masters of extending the aural and technical possibilities of their respective instruments. Robert Dick, flute and Ursel Schlicht, piano, both virtuoso’s and visionaries around the combination of new music and improvisation share compositional title on all the works on the CD. Robert plays multiple flutes including the Glissando Headjoint, flute, piccolo, open hole alto flute, bass flute and contrabass flute, all with his usual virtuosity, insight, accuracy, humor and flare!   Schlicht is an excellent player, lyrical and beautiful when it’s called for and expert in prepared piano, percussive and brilliant rhythmically too.  They are a dynamic team.  I particularly liked Schlicht’s ‘A Lingering Scent of Eden for it’s combination of lyrical expressive writing and contrasting jazzy and evocative extended techniques. The piece describes a chapter in Alan Wiseman’s “The World Without Us” that tell us about undisturbed landscapes, never manipulated by humans.  It’s an interesting concept in our urbanized lives.   I also love Dick’s amazing work, “Dark Matter” for contrabass flute and piano.  It’s a truly humorous piece as Robert uses nonsense texts that internet spammers affix to emails to try and elude spam filters.  Dick became fascinated by how the random texts “Sometimes …say really amazing things”.  Dick recites the text and together Schlicht and Robert match the text with their own musical responses.     The other pieces on the CD are, Ursel  Schlict’s  “Tendrils” Robert Dick’s Sic Bisquitus Disintegrat and Life Matter and by both composers, the title score of the CD “The Galilean Moons”, a piece that creates beautiful and complex sound paintings based on the four moons of the planet Jupiter.  I hope you will take the time to listen to the album as it is a wondrous journey into intricate, challenging and beautiful sounds for flute, that expands our understanding of what’s possible for flutes both compositionally and technically....

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Arnone and McTeer REACT Album Review

Posted by on Jan 2, 2017 in CD Reviews, Featured, January 2017 | 0 comments

Arnone and McTeer REACT Album Review

Flutist Francesca Arnone and violinist Mikylah McTeer teamed up to release an innovative and dynamic recording entitled REACT. McTeer and Arnone perform diverse electroacoustic pieces on their first collaborative album REACT, released on Ravello Records. The works on this album successfully demonstrate the range of potential for electroacoustic music to facilitate both experimental and traditional compositional ideas.The featured composers explore new ways of creating and organizing sound, and--as performed with either computer or other interactive electronics--the violin and flute help construct unique sonic landscapes.     The Ravello catalogue overview of this album describes the highlights as such: Interact and React, composed by Ben Johansen for flute, violin and interactive computer, is unique for its incorporation of non-instrumental sounds (such as mouth noises, whistling, stomping, snapping, and more) into its musical landscape, and has three basic parts: two deeply abstract outer sections, with an intervening period of fierce counterpoint between the flute and violin. Margaret Schedel’s Partita, Perihelion for violin and interactive computer most clearly blends traditional ideas with electroacoustic ones, as the electronics grow out of the solo violin part. The titles of its three movements refer to Baroque dance suite forms, and also paraphrase, if not outright quote, Bach’s solo violin partitas. Luminosity, David Taddie’s flute and electroacoustic piece, is one of the more traditional experimental works on the album, using synthesized sounds that can be traced back to electronic music from the 1960s and 70s. The album commences with Arnone’s mastery of several flutes including C flute, and alto flute in Ben Johansen’s Interact. McTeer and Arnone intertwine melodies that are in turn heard “on tape.” The piece is beautifully executed, instantly beckoning the listener to dive further. This striking duo presents a breathtaking look into flute, violin, and electronics repertoire. Arnone’s luxurious sounds combined with McTeer’s dazzling artistry make for a feast for the senses. On Luminosity by David Taddie, Arnone begins by showcasing her Alto Flute. Her elegant and commanding flute follows with souring mellifluous melodies. With Arnone’s enchanting flute at the helm, this piece transports you into other realms. Perihelion by Margaret Schedel showcases Mikylah McTeer’s polished and sonorous violin. This haunting work is expertly woven with McTeer’s magnificent sounds.     Vox Clamantis by Russell Pinkston is beautifully presented by McTeer and Arnone with resounding lyricism. The balance between the three voices is bewitching. The listener is lured in by the engaging and impeccable sounds of Arnone and McTeer that create an impressive cauldron of enchantments. REACT is a delightful look into innovative, contemporary repertoire for flute, violin, and electronics. A true feast for the senses!   --Viviana Guzman...

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Jan Vinci American FluteScape Album Review

Posted by on Jan 2, 2017 in CD Reviews, Featured, January 2017 | 0 comments

Jan Vinci American FluteScape Album Review

As the title suggests Jan Vinci’s new CD is a combination of classic 20th century flute compositions as well as several premieres and 21st century works.  This beautiful album introduces us to two new pieces by Vinci’s husband Jazz saxophonist and composer Mark Vinci (Crow’s Nest and TINGsha Bom t-Bom t-Bom) as well as compositions by Jennifer Higdon (Flute Poetic), Katherine Hoover (Medieval Suite), Acht Stucke by Paul Hindemith, and the Griffes Poem. She writes in her opening notes “Just as a textilist weaves threads into a tapestry, a composer crafts a collage if timbres, rhythms and silence into a soundscape.”  Vinci reflects this beautifully in this multi-faceted album.  Each piece, as she writes in her very well written notes each piece tells a story, and Vinci tells the stories with beautiful, colorful sound, perfect pitch and deep interpretation.  You are aware of how much thought she’s given to each piece on the album and her deep love of presenting this music.  American FluteScape opens with a newly commissioned work by the brilliant composer Jennifer Higdon called Flute Poetic.  Vinci has known Higdon since she gave her flute lessons in their native Tennessee!  Higdon composed an original first movement and then arranged two movements from her String Poetic for violin and piano.  The result is a terrific new flute sonata by this Pulitzer Prize winning composer.     I loved the new works by Mark Vinci, especially the newest one TINGsha Bom t-Bom t-Bom (cool title) which is for flute and orchestra.  The New York Dream Orchestra made up of top NYC players is expertly conducted by the composer. Mark combines both improvisation and classical structure in both of his pieces, giving the flutist a chance to shine in her own improvisations as well as to show her virtuosity in a range of technical challenges. Jan is accompanied by the stellar pianist Rieko Uchida, herself a noted chamber musician and soloist.  Their ensemble and interpretations blend perfectly in seamless playing, check out how they and blend lines and trills in Medieval Suite. Congratulations Jan on a wonderful new album! You can purchase the CD at: www.Albanyrecords.com or at www.JanVinci.com. The CD was produced, engineered and mastered by Adam Abeshouse at Pelham Studio, Pelham NY and at The DiMenna Center for Classical Music, NYC. --Barbara Siesel...

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Paul Lustig Dunkel Alive in the Studio Album Review

Posted by on Dec 1, 2016 in CD Reviews, December 2016, Featured | 0 comments

Paul Lustig Dunkel Alive in the Studio Album Review

Paul Lustig Dunkel has a new CD!  Dunkel, well known here in NYC is currently the Principal Flutist of the New York City Ballet and the Music Director Emeritus of the Westchester Philharmonic. His new CD introduces us to many new works for flute in various configurations. It’s a deeply felt and beautifully played album with an interesting concept, as well. In these days of hyper mixed and edited albums, Dunkel takes a cue from the singer/songwriter world and presents us with a live recording. No mixing, editing (or minimal), just the sound of the instruments well recorded with great mics in a studio. It’s great to experience the music as one would at a live concert, hearing Paul’s sound very clearly as well as the accompanying instruments – well balanced, but not adjusted. A reality experience!!! The CD presents four large works, starting with Dunkel’s arrangement of the Shostakovich Cello Sonata in D minor, transcribed for flute, which he’s arranged with surprisingly excellent results. Now we have a beautiful flute piece by Shostakovich to add to our repertoire possibilities.  The second work on the album is by Dunkel himself – a flute quartet that I’m sure will amuse all the flutists out there! It’s based on hearing excellent flutists practice at William Kincaid’s flute camp, and it’s a fascinating and funny overlay of all of our favorite excerpts and exercises. Here are the movement titles: La cage des oiseaux, In memorium: J.A. (you’ll recognize these), La nuit des faunes, and Taffanel et Chloe. I couldn’t stop laughing during this piece and I challenge you to list all the pieces included in this terrific quartet.  Joining Dunkel in the quartet are three wonderful players- Laura Conwesser alto flute, Rie Schmidt flute and Tanya Witek flute and piccolo.     Drummer Tony Moreno’s work, Episodes for Flute and Percussion is a virtuosic, exciting piece for flute and drums, utilizing many complex polyrhythms for both the drums and flute. The first movement is based mathematically on the Fibonacci sequence which yields precise harmony, rhythmic displacements, and pitch/class sets. The second movement is virtuosic for the drums and is a study in meter combinations of seven. The final piece on the album, for flute and piano is Tamar Muskal’s Sof and Mechanofin, Mechanofin-combining the words mechanical and end and the word Sof - end in Hebrew  takes us on a mechanically repeating journey ending in beauty and hope. Dunkel is accompanied by the extraordinary pianist Peter Basquin, who plays with virtuosic technique and exquisite subtlety, matching the flute in every way. Paul Dunkel is a terrific and deep player with beautiful sound, color and imagination, who plays so well that he can record a CD live and have it sound...

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Patricia Surman The American Album Review

Posted by on Dec 1, 2016 in CD Reviews, December 2016, Featured | 0 comments

Patricia Surman The American Album Review

The American Album Centaur CRC 3525 Patricia Surman, flute Kostas Chardas, piano Dr. Patricia Surman, who has recently joined the faculty of Metropolitan State University of Denver, has released a stunning album of American works on Centaur Records. The composers represented on this album span the entire 20th century into the 21st century. I especially appreciated the inclusion of pieces from the standard repertoire as well as some new gems. The works represented on the album include: Sonata (Three Lakes) – Daniel Dorff   I. Lake Wallenpaupack   II. Kezar Lake   III. Salmon Lake Black Anemones – Joseph Schwantner Three American Pieces for Flute and Piano – Lukas Foss   I. Early Song   II. Dedication   III. Composer’s Holiday Antiques of a Mechanical Nature – Chapman Welch Duo for Flute and Piano – Aaron Copland   I. Flowing   II. Poetic, somewhat mournful   III. Lively, with bounce   On the first hearing, Surman’s fantastic tone is immediately evident. It is robust, substantial, and beautiful. She shows the listener a variety of tone colors throughout the various works. Her technique is masterful, and her articulation is crystal clear and communicative. The collaboration between Surman and pianist Kostas Chardas is solid. Overall, this is an outstanding album and highly recommended.  --Tammy Evans...

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Sebastian Jacot Premiere Album Review

Posted by on Nov 1, 2016 in CD Reviews, Featured, November 2016 | 0 comments

Sebastian Jacot Premiere Album Review

Sebastian Jacot received first prize at the 2014 Carl Nielsen International Flute Competition as well as fist prize at the Kobe International Competition in 2013. He presently plays principal flute with the Gewandhaus Orchestra.  He’s a truly accomplished player and only 29 years old!  His new album Premiere! is a collection of some of our favorite flute concertos: Reinecke, Ibert, and Nielsen played with the excellent Odense Symphony Orchestra, David Bjorkman conductor. It’s a beautiful CD – Jacot is that rare combination flutist who plays with copious virtuosity and with a tender, natural musicality that can make you cry. All of the performances on the album were recorded live as part of the 2014 Carl Nielsen International Flute Competition. My only consideration is the engineering of the CD- the flute levels are very soft. Even in the very forte sections of the Nielsen Concerto, the flute never reached beyond mezzo forte in volume. I would have liked to be awash in Jacot’s lovely sound and I never had that opportunity throughout the album. --Barbara Siesel...

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Paula Robison Caprice Album Review

Posted by on Nov 1, 2016 in CD Reviews, Featured, November 2016 | 0 comments

Paula Robison Caprice Album Review

Paula Robison's latest CD, Caprice, is a brilliant mix new and standard works for flute and piano.  The album is called "Caprice" in honor of Thierry Lancino's sublime Cinq Caprices which "are adapted for flute and piano especially for this recording" as stated in the liner notes.  In addition, the album features the works of Claude Debussy, Olivier Messiaen,  and Pierre Boulez.  The songs by Claude Debussy were transcribed for flute and piano by Paula Robison.  The pianist is the brilliant Finnish pianist Paavali Jumppanen. The album commences with the quintessential flute work, Afternoon of a Faun by Claude Debussy, arranged for flute and piano by Paula Robison and Paavali Jumppanen.  Robison's ethereal sound provides a graceful beginning to the album.  Jumppanen's exquisite playing provides the perfect collaborator for the album. Pierre Boulez' Sonatine is next on the album.  The Robison-Jumppanen Duo execute this enigmatic work with earnest passion and mystery. In the Quatre Melodies by Claude Debussy we hear the Duo's lyrical warmth and romantic zest.  Robinson's tone is rich with fervor and utmost elegance.  Jumppanen's sultry sound and Robison's poetic musicality provide superb performance of these voluptuous works.     Thierry Lancino's Cinq Caprices are exquisitely both fragile and powerful.  Robison and Jumppanen cast an unearthly sheen on these provocative and delightful works. Olivier Messiaen's Le Merle Noir is splendidly performed by the Robison-Jumppanen Duo.  Robison's Le Merle Noir is thrilling.  From the first notes, Robison and Jumppanen weave an especially ravishing landscape, concocting an enchanting spell. Paula Robison's recording of Claude Debussy's Syrinx and divinely satisfying.  In this particular track, the flute is mic-ed differently than the rest of the album, leaving us with a bewitching interpretation of this iconic work for flute.  Robison makes the flute resonate with a captivating luster, painting Syrinx as both sensual and whimsical. In Claude Debussy's Le vent dans la plaine from Preludes Book 1, Jumppanen's expert technique performs with majesty and power. The final piece on the album, La Flute de Pan by Claude Debussy, the Robison-Jumppanen Duo end the CD with incredible tasteful beauty. Caprice by Paula Robison and Paavali Jumppanen, is an album that is sure to become a favorite in every flute lover's collection. --Viviana Guzman, The Flute View...

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Sarah Jane Hargis Saving the Queen Album Review

Posted by on Nov 1, 2016 in CD Reviews, Featured, November 2016 | 0 comments

Sarah Jane Hargis Saving the Queen Album Review

Sarah Jane Hargis has always interested me as a flutist ever since I saw her perform with pedals at the Las Vegas NFA Convention and at this past year’s NFA where she performed original compositions, both solo and with flutist Melissa Keeling, so I was very excited when I received her newest album Saving the Queen. The album cover first caught my eye, where the “Rockstar Flutist” is wearing a gas mask and pearls.    The gas mask represents Hargis’ struggle with becoming severely ill from black mold, while having to abandon all possessions as well as her home, and start over again. Almost all the music on this album was written during that time. Hargis explains: “the name of the album is Saving the Queen because it was really my music that I think saved me and what had me pull through these dark times in my life.” The album is ethereal and mystical upon first listen. With the first two tracks being arrangements of familiar pieces Syrinx and "Sarabande" from Bach’s Partita, I wanted to listen a few times to hear all the nuances of each pedal, each overtone, each frequency, and processed sound. I was happy to hear something different every time! "Cyan Motion" is an original track that I loved hearing live at NFA, but with the excellent mixing of this album, I could hear many more electronics. In this uptempo piece, she multi-tracks and loops, creating beautiful and intricate harmonies and sounds.      The fourth track, "Bellow," has the listener entering an enchanted forest. The pitch bends and emptiness where the wind is the only sound conjures up many images of trees dancing, wind blowing, and nature.  At points, Hargis’ flute sounds like an echoing electric guitar. "Indigo Waters" is one of my favorite tracks on the album. Hargis’ Kentucky background shines through in this track about the coal miners of her state. The original piece starts off sparse and then leads into a dance. Hargis does pitch bends like a champion, and her use of pedals accentuate them even more. The sixth track, "Meditation," is another favorite. This track is something I’d love to hear in a yoga class or an ayahuasca ceremony. The steady electronic drone is haunting and the flute line is evocative. The flute in this piece is not as processed as the former pieces, but it doesn’t need to be. The beautiful, simple lines are enough to put you in a state of bliss. The only bad thing about this piece is that it ends so soon! (I, personally, could listen to this type of music for hours) The last segment of Saving the Queen starts with the lively "Pistachio." Its jaunty and syncopated rhythms put you back into a groove after waking from the "Meditation." Hargis’ cover of "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" is hopeful and nostalgic, and I think of the story behind the album when listening to this poignant track of pure solo flute. This track has the least processing so it offers the chance to listen to Hargis’ beautiful sound. "Meditation II" finishes the album by putting the listener in one last trance like state, which in my opinion, is a great way to finish an album. Saving the Queen is very well mixed, arranged, and played, and the Rockstar Flutist is a composer/flutist to look out for! --Fluterscooter...

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Ned McGowan The Art of the Contrabass Flute Album Review

Posted by on Oct 3, 2016 in CD Reviews, Featured, October 2016 | 0 comments

Ned McGowan The Art of the Contrabass Flute Album Review

Composer and flutist Ned McGowan has a new CD for contrabass flute!! It’s an amazing album of original, virtuosic works by this talented and noted composer. Many of you may have heard some of his music this August at the most recent NFA conference, so you know what I mean.  McGowan is a virtuoso of the contrabass flute having written the first concerto for contrabass flute and orchestra, premiered with the American Composer’s Orchestra at Carnegie Hall in 2008 (how did I miss this concert????). Each piece on this album conveys McGowan’s interest in rhythmic complexity, and the intersection of European art music, Indian Carnatic music, popular forms, and the avant garde. He employs extended techniques to exceptionally expand the range of the contrabass, and the expert layering of multiple tracks creates a unique sound world.  In Earthly Chants I, McGowan begins with a wall of sound reminiscent of Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring– the image that comes to mind is primordial ooze with the sound of the flute rising from the harmonic ground. Benson Town for contrabass flute and Mridangam (an ancient percussion instrument from India used in Carnatic music) has a rock influenced rhythm with the flute and drum in an elaborate rhythmic dance. Winter's Breath for contrabass flute and piano is a more traditional piece with lovely, singing melodic lines. In Earthly Chants II, I checked to see if my floor was vibrating! Deep sounds well up, and I could hear some echoes (homage) to Varese’s Density 21.5.     Wurelguik for flute and electronics has beautifully layered sounds and repeated patterns which eventually speed up into a virtuosic display of articulation with electronic overlays and sound expansion.  I appreciated McGowan’s sparing and logical use of electronic sounds. Earthly Chants III, subtitled “Don’t Forget Everyday, Your Funky Prayers to Say,” brings us back to the opening sounds, expanding to deep sea and whale sounds and eventually into a swinging, joyous dancing rhythm. I enjoyed this album, from the virtuosity and beautiful sounds to the humor and complexity, it makes me want to play the contrabass flute! --Barbara Siesel...

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Elisabeth Möst Accento Austria Album Review

Posted by on Oct 3, 2016 in CD Reviews, Featured, October 2016 | 0 comments

Elisabeth Möst Accento Austria Album Review

Accento Austria (Gramola 99100) Elisabeth Möst, flute, Maroje Brčić, guitar   Flutist Elisabeth Möst and guitarist Maroje Brčić have presented a lovely collection of works that span nineteenth- and twentieth-century Austria. While the majority of the works on this album were written in the twentieth-century, two were written by composers whose lives span the eighteenth- and nineteenth-centuries.   Five Miniatures – Cesar Bresgen I. Ruhig II. Fließend III. Gehend IV. Wiegend. Rascher V. Gehende Viertel Grand Duo concertant in A major/A-Dur, op. 85 – Mauro Giuliani I. Allegro moderato II. Andante molto sostenuto III. Scherzo: Vivace IV. Allegretto espressivo Scherzo Capriccioso from/aus “Drei Stücke” – Alfred Uhl Sonata semplice, op. 18 – Jan Truhlář I. Allegretto con umore II. Andante III. Allegro scherzoso Serenade in D major/D-Dur, op. 19 – Leonardo von/de Call I. Adagio. Allegro II. Adagio III. Menuetto. Trio IV. Rondo When the listener also considers the various influences surrounding the composition of these works--which include World War II, a highly vocal bel canto style, and socialist realism to name a few--the result is a variety of styles that can be heard in the assorted works on this recording.     The partnership between Möst and Brčić is particularly well-balanced. Möst’s tone is sonorous, and her phrasing is tasteful and carefully done. Overall, this is an excellent recording of works for flute and guitar that are slightly off the beaten path.  --Tammy Evans Yonce...

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