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Yu Yuan: Artist Interview

Posted by on Dec 1, 2017 in December 2017, Featured, Interviews, Issues | 0 comments

Yu Yuan: Artist Interview

Yu Yuan is a student at the Conservatoire National de Musique et Danse de Paris in the class of Professor Philippe Bernold, assisted by Florence Souchard-Delépine. In 2012, he won first prize in the children's section of the inaugural China Flute Association Competition and in 2015, he was given an honorable mention at the 67th International Prague Spring Music Competition. This year he was the winner of the 7th Krakow International Flute Competition and the 9th Kobe International Flute Competition. How did you feel during the Kobe Competition? I came into Kobe from France, so one problem I had was jetlag. I was really tired after I arrived, so I think I played quite badly in the first round. I played better after that, but there were always things in each piece I wish I had played differently. I was also very stressed throughout the competition as the level was really high and I knew I couldn’t make too many mistakes. How did you prepare? Due to high school and conservatory classes, I didn’t have that much time, so I really had to focus while I was practicing. I dedicated five months of practice for the Kobe pieces, working with my teacher, Professor Philippe Bernold. One of his suggestions was to go to museums and listen to concerts during this time, to keep my mind open and ideas alive. This also helped to release stress. Which pieces did you have to play? I had to choose between the pieces set by the Kobe organizers. For me the most interesting pieces were in the second round. The piece by Michel Blavet is a typical French baroque piece that is not very well known, but is so rich and beautiful. My second piece for this round, Andersen’s ‘Ballade et Danse des Sylphes’ is also not well known. The most common choice for this round was Jolivet’s ‘Chant de Linos’, so perhaps playing this piece allowed me to stand out. What was the most challenging part? One challenging problem was that I took part in the Krakow competition in April, with Kobe starting in May. I had to prepare all the pieces for both competitions, with only one piece used in both, and I wanted to play as many as I could by heart. Learning and preparing so many pieces was exhausting, but the results made it worthwhile. Any advice for young flutists who’s dream is to win Kobe? While participating in competitions, they should aim to win first prize. I think some people are too modest, feeling that they could never win, and therefore don’t perform as well as they could. Young flutists should look for the teacher who is most suited to them, someone who they like to listen to and like to study with. Everyone’s ideal teacher will be different, so choose the person who is best for you. I think it’s also important to play in front of others, performing your music. It is on stage that you become a musician. Finally, never be discouraged! Keep taking part in competitions, concerts and orchestras. Yu Yuan's YouTube channel:...

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MeToo in the Flute Community. By Mara Miller and The Flute View

Posted by on Dec 1, 2017 in Blog, December 2017 | 0 comments

MeToo in the Flute Community.  By Mara Miller and The Flute View

Call to Action   Many have recently become familiar with the social media movement called, “Me too.” Initially, its’ origins stem from activist, Tarana Burke, who created the movement in the late 90’s to support women of color that have experienced sexual abuse or assault. In October of 2017, actress Alyssa Milano called attention to the movement once more, spurring the viral Twitter hashtag #MeToo.   Women began using the hashtag on social media to openly share their experiences with sexual assault and harassment. Despite the heart-breakingly wide breadth of sensitive stories shared, many people found the movement empowering and transformative. Though originally created for exclusively women, men took part in expanding the movement during this reprise as well, sharing their sexual assault and harassment experiences.   Making Things Known   The sheer number of personal stories that were told was overwhelming and powerful. So powerful, that the ladies of The Flute View and myself felt compelled to analyze how “Me too” manifests in our own communities, specifically the flute community, and what could be done to help change that.   We asked a group of flutists to share, if they felt comfortable, any experiences they may have come across within the music community regarding sexual harassment or assault. Below are their stories. Names will remain anonymous.   Take the Train Home   “I rarely, if ever, did something strategic for my career, like taking a lesson with someone who I thought could help me. Somehow I always wanted to do it myself, perhaps looking back, it's a foolish approach. Anyway, I noticed that someone's students always seemed to win a certain big competition and thought, "I'll take a lesson with him and let him know that I'm interested in the competition.” I had been invited to the competition based on someone hearing me at a master class and this person was one of the judges. I went to the lesson - taking the train to another city, had the lesson, and then it was time for dinner. The teacher got very drunk, so drunk that he needed to be brought back to his hotel room, which I did, with the teacher needing to be held up by me (LOL).  Next, the teacher needed help getting into bed, and then he needed me to stay the night to "help" him.  At that point I said - "you know, I think I'll take the train home". It was quite late and I think he was counting on me not being willing to travel alone that late, but it didn't bother me as it was time to leave.  Needless to say I didn't win the competition!  The teacher called a few days later and offered to write me a recommendation.   I write about this because I wonder how many of us were silenced into not competing and not thinking that our work was deserving of a place in the winners circle, how many creative voices are left out of the discussion, who gets the major career?  I do think that many female flutists have achieved prominence but given the percentages of women to men in our world, things look a bit skewed to me.”   A Lesson in Professionalism   “Once while sitting in a partner lesson, instead of teaching,...

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How to STAND OUT in a world of SPAM. by Fluterscooter

Posted by on Dec 1, 2017 in Articles, December 2017, Entrepreneurship, Essays, Featured, Issues | 0 comments

How to STAND OUT in a world of SPAM.  by Fluterscooter

Black Friday. Giving Tuesday. Cyber WEEK (didn't it used to be just Cyber Monday?)  As we're in the midst of holiday Spam Season, I thought it would be a good time to share what has been on my mind lately.  Every year, I feel worse and worse about sending holiday sale newsletters and promoting social media posts.  And I shouldn't feel bad about it.  I worked hard to establish my business for the past 7 years, and I enjoy making my fellow flutists happy with a flute bag they adore.  I continue to speak to college students and graduates about Entrepreneurship in the creative arts, I encourage them to think outside of the box, and I give them advice on starting their own businesses as I did. In a recent talk to a college Music Business class, we discussed how to promote yourself, and the topic of spam came up.  While just a few years ago, I encouraged students to promote themselves heavily on social media, now I am telling them to shy away.  We talked about how, these days, everyone has a brand (including themselves as an artist) that they are trying to push.  The problem is how to differentiate between the real and the fake.  And I guess that is a common thread everywhere now.  The internet has grown into a spam mega-mall, and it seems everywhere you turn, someone is trying to sell you something. First, we need to clarify the difference between supporting an entrepreneurial business, and one of the minions of a multi-level marketing pyramid scheme.  While so many facebook friends now have their own "small businesses" of selling everything from press-on nails to essential oils to jewelry from multi-level marketing companies, and they are constantly sending messages and posting to get friends to buy these products, we tend to get overwhelmed and our inboxes oversaturated.  There is nothing wrong with having a side hustle, but the problem lies within the over-posting, the aggressive marketing tactics, and the lack of personalization.  We have turned into robots marketing to fellow robots. So, what IS the new way?  How can we stand out if everything gets filtered in with everything else?  How do we differentiate the real from the fake and choose what businesses to support?  One idea is to go back to making things personal again.  We are all craving more real experiences and personal connections, at least I am.  Lets pretend there is no internet, for a second.  How would you get your brand out there? Here is a good exercise for you:  Think of 3 ways, without internet/social media, that you can reach people in a more authentic and personal way.  Here are mine: COLLABORATE.  No, I don't mean collaborate on another "Acapella" video.  Collaborate with real people in real life.  Go to events, concerts, etc..to meet those people. DISCUSS.  Lets have real conversations again.  Lets speak over the phone, lets have in person meetings.  Lets discuss our thoughts with as many people as possible.  Build your network based on personal connections rather than impersonal emails. LISTEN and SLOW DOWN.  Listen to each others' ideas.  Are we really listening?  Are we really paying attention?  The more we can understand each other and understand how connected we are, the more success we will can all build together....

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12 Holiday Flute Gift Ideas

Posted by on Dec 1, 2017 in Blog, December 2017, Featured, Flute Fashion, Issues, Lifestyle | 0 comments

12 Holiday Flute Gift Ideas

The Flute View's Holiday Gift Ideas Do you need help with a creative gift for your favorite flutist?  Following are a sample list of our personal favorite flute items.  Feel free to include  YOUR suggestions, too.   HAPPY HOLIDAYS!!!! -The Flute View Team     Viviana's List 1. Does your favorite flutist have flute insurance? Check out Anderson’s Musical Instrument Insurance for the best rates. Highly recommended! http://www.fluteinsurance.com 2. The Tornado Flute Booster will give your flute an AMAZING upgrade. I recommend trying it out. The price is right, too, for only $36.95, you, too, can start giving your flute sound an extra boost! http://www.musiquedemarc.com/En/default.asp?pg=tor 3. Get a new flute! Flute World offers great deals on flutes by Altus, Burkhart, Powell, Jupiter…. you name it! http://www.FluteWorld.com 4.  Stocking Stuffers? Purchase 2017 Flute Releases! Here are a few items: Sweet Dream by Jean-Louis Beaumadier Kingdom of Mountains by Suzanne Teng A Little Tango in Her Blood, edited compilation of tango sheet music by Alison Young Song of the Whale by Viviana Guzman Aya Tunes Vol. 2 by Fluterscooter Barbara's List 1. Powell Flutes: Black 90th Birthday Hoodie in my fav color – Black! This is a fun and fashionable hoodie which will keep you warm and let the world know about the Powell Flute Company and their 90th anniversary! $47.61 2. A Flute View Subscription for your favorite flutist $12.95 for a year! An affordable and informative gift for flute lovers everywhere. 3. New CD’s that I like: Emi Ferguson's "Amour Cruel" and Barbara Kortmann's "Inner Lights". These inspiring and beautiful CD’s are a great addition to your favorite flutist’s collection. 4. I love these Jumbo Music Paperclips from Flute World. They make all your presentations look good!! $5.95 for 5. Fluterscooter's List 1. Even if you're not a Bjork fan, her new album "Utopia" has some amazing flute choir arrangements on most of the songs.  Excellent flute writing from Bjork herself.  Add this to your non-classical playlist! 2. Beaumont Music Cleaning Cloths.  Super cute cleaning cloths and swabs for your flute.  They work on computer screens and glasses, too! 3. Flute jewelry is always a great stocking stuffer, and Tracy Harris' FluteFinery line is affordable, too! 4. LeFreque Sound Bridge.  There are many options of LeFreque's for your budget, but a good one to start with is the Solid Silver.  Try one and hear the difference it makes, especially in ensemble playing! Happy Holidays from The Flute...

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Dr. G’s December Flute Horoscopes. By Rachel Taylor Geier

Posted by on Dec 1, 2017 in December 2017, Dr. G's Flute Horoscopes, Featured, Issues | 0 comments

Dr. G’s December Flute Horoscopes.  By Rachel Taylor Geier

There are two major themes in the month of December that will potentially wreak havoc in everybody’s lives if we do not remain calm, cool, and collected: Mercury retrograde and Saturn changing signs. These 2 party poopers are raining on the parade that Jupiter and Venus created last month. It won’t be so bad if we remember to keep our wits about us and roll with the punches (Keep Clam. Play Flute). Mercury retrograde will be happening from December 3-22. During a Mercury retrograde, things tend to go haywire and we are often faced with miscommunications and strange blips in technology (for example, you may want to update your iOS now before your smartphone starts going bezerk). This is also a great time to review and revise any creative projects you may be working on. Use this time to make your ideas (and flute playing) sparkle a bit brighter. Saturn, the taskmaster, will be moving into Capricorn on December 20th, turning your focus onto responsibilities and new lessons to be learned for the next 2 ½ years. Capricorn is the natural home of Saturn, so this new energy should be easier than some of our past Saturn transits. Try to remain positive when faced with obstacles. Saturn wants you to learn, grow, and improve your lives. It’s time to roll up your sleeves and get to work!   Sagittarius (November 22-December 21) HAPPY BIRTHDAY! The sun is shining in your sign for most of the month highlighting your 1st house of YOU and your visibility in the world, but that pesky Mercury retrograde occurring from December 3-22, also in your 1st house, is complicating matters by asking you to review, rethink, and revise any personal projects. Who are you as flutist? What makes you different from other flutists? Use this time to think about your past performances and think about some of the ways you can improve upon what you have already accomplished. If you are working on a CD, this is a great time to edit tracks and re-record anything that you are not 100% happy with. If you are working on a publishing project, proofread the work you have already written. There may be typos and major edits that you have overlooked. Although this might seem overwhelming, you will actually enjoy the review process as Venus, also in your 1st house, is stimulating your creativity and creating harmony in all projects. On December 20th, Saturn is moving out of your sign and moving into your 2nd house of income, where he will stay for the next 2 ½ years. Whenever Saturn is in the 2nd house, you may find yourself freaking out about money. Are you making enough? Do you need to raise your lesson fees? What other income streams can you add to your life? Would you like to try Skype lessons? Are you interested in creating a new app to give your income a boost? Saturn will help you figure out what is bringing in money, what could bring in more money, and what is just not worth your time and effort anymore. When the sun goes into Capricorn the very next day (December 21st), it will highlight some of these same themes in Saturn. Pay attention to what the Universe is telling you on...

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Molly Barth: Album Review

Posted by on Dec 1, 2017 in CD Reviews, December 2017, Featured, Issues, Reviews | 0 comments

Molly Barth: Album Review

  This album includes seven chamber works involving flute written between the years 1984 and 2011 by David Lang, co-founder of Bang on a Can and winner of the 2008 Pulitzer Prize. Molly Barth, Associate Professor of Flute at University of Oregon and founding member of eighth blackbird, is the consistent performer throughout all works on this album. Thorn (1993), which features solo flute performed expertly by Molly Barth, features her hugely resonant sound. The extreme register changes are expertly managed and woven into a constantly moving line. It is four delightful minutes of extraordinary control. Lend/Lease (2008) includes Barth on piccolo and introduces woodblocks. The percussion adds a depth to the piccolo sound and also serves to emphasize certain moments of articulation. Short Fall (2000) is a somewhat larger chamber ensemble, including piccolo, violin, cello, and piano. The combination creates a rich texture of complementary sounds. It is balanced so no line emerges as primary, and the whole becomes greater than the sum of the parts. Zachariah Galatis joins Barth on piccolo for the next work, Involuntary (2011). It is an energetic combination of piccolos, trumpets, and crisp forward momentum provided by snare drum. Vent (1990) features a quickly moving piano line with longer flute gestures over the top; the flute part later switches to the faster motion. The momentum slows towards the end of the piece and then speeds up again, leading to an abrupt end. Driving lines are passed back and forth between the combination of piano, flute, and pizzicato cello in Burn Notice (1988). Contrasting timbres are at work again in the final work on the album, Frag (1984). Short fragments alternate between flute, oboe, and pizzicato cello. Overall, this is a well-executed album of flute and piccolo playing of the absolute highest quality. It receives my strongest recommendation. -Tammy Evans...

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Is your Social Media feed affecting your self-esteem and productivity? by Fluterscooter

Posted by on Dec 1, 2017 in Articles, December 2017, Essays, Featured, Health & Wellness, Issues, Lifestyle | 0 comments

Is your Social Media feed affecting your self-esteem and productivity?  by Fluterscooter

How many times have you checked Instagram today?  Facebook?  Twitter?  Are you looking at your phone as you're reading this article?  How many times did you check your phone during your last practice session?  These modern technologies are not only causing us to become more distracted and disconnected, but they are also affecting our self-esteem and productivity both in the practice room and in our daily lives. We took an Instagram poll: 116 replied that they turn their phone off/on silent during practicing, but 85 replied that they do not. And this is a problem. As a student and a young professional flutist, I consider myself lucky that smartphones did not exist during my formative years.  I had intensely focused practice sessions with no distractions except if someone needed the practice room.  Where I see how phones are necessary to not miss calls for gigs and such, I do not see the point of bringing them into the practice room otherwise.  Since I started my Transcendental Meditation practice, the importance of quieting the mind and getting into a zone of pure focus has changed my practicing methods.  Think of your flute practice as a meditation.  Would you check your phone when you meditate? For example, you are concentrating on a phrase, and then your phone vibrates.  Whether or not you check the message, the thought of the phone vibrating is still there, and your phrase has been interrupted and your concentration affected. Or you take a break and check social media, with the rage of the daily news infiltrating your thoughts.  Picking up your flute after that and trying to focus on creating beautiful music will not be as easy.  Or, you look at videos from other flutists and think to yourself, will I ever be that good?  While the videos can also be motivating, for the most part, they set unrealistic expectations for a less advanced student and can be discouraging. Is the next generation of musicians turning into distracted performers? It will be interesting to see how this next generation of flutists will be as performers.  Will their performances flow as well as their predecessors'?  How will nerves come into play?  And what about audiences? For those of you who answered "No" to our Instagram poll, here are a couple things you could try: Disconnect to Reconnect.  I have been making it a habit to turn off all devices at 8pm every night.   Try it!  And, of course, try it in the practice room and see how much more connected you are to the music. Stop looking Outward and look Inward.  Look within the music, your sound, your breath.  If you feel yourself getting distracted by the outside world, look...

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Entrepreneurship: When Should You Re-Trench? By Barbara Siesel

Posted by on Dec 1, 2017 in December 2017, Entrepreneurship, Featured, Issues | 0 comments

Entrepreneurship: When Should You Re-Trench?  By Barbara Siesel

It’s been awhile since I’ve written about entrepreneurship, so I thought this month I’d share my thoughts with you about why I’ve been quiet, and how it can be helpful to you on your path to a successful business. The business dictionary defines retrenchment this way: A strategy used by corporations to reduce the diversity or the overall size of the operations of the company. This strategy is often used in order to cut expenses with the goal of becoming a more financially stable business. Typically the strategy involves withdrawing from certain markets or the discontinuation of selling certain products or services in order to make a beneficial turnaround. How might that definition apply to my own particular business, since it sounds like a definition for a very large company? I’ve been working hard on my overall mission which is to revitalize and bring classical music back into our culture and doing this in several ways: bringing it into schools which have lost their music programming with my Edtech startup Curriculive, which is integrating music into K-12 curricula with storybooks, curriculum, and live or livestreamed performances and with The Green Golly Project- live interdisciplinary performances and recitals for children and adults at schools, libraries and PAC’s, as well as teaching and performing, workshops and masterclasses to support young and aspiring students. This is a large operation for 2 people to run, with many moving parts, requiring many hours a day to run. By the end of this past summer it became clear that something needed to change. After spending months getting a sales team up to speed and creating a prototype for Curriculive we lost our sales team and we didn’t really like our first prototype. Meanwhile the rest of our business needed to be maintained in order to pay our bills and keep our options open -- so we decided to pull back and figure out what it is we really want to do with our time and how we want to make money. Which of our activities will accomplish the overall mission and what is the best way to go about it? I’m usually very busy planning and taking actions to reach my goals but this time I decided to do nothing, to be quiet and wait for the actions and ideas to come to me. To be in the present with whatever might come to me by waiting and listening. I think of it as being in a liminal place in time, a way for me to hear what it is I really want and to let the universe show me the direction to go. I wanted to simplify and see which part of my business I should let rest for a while. Did I get any answers? I think I did but there were surprises too!! My initial answer was to take a break from the Edtech part of Curriculive and go back to basics, meaning live Green Golly Project performances and committing to building up my teaching studio and performing, I’d “retrench” and become more financially stable by not working on Curriculive in order to make a “beneficial turn around.”   I’d still be on my path to accomplish my overall mission and remain open to what comes next. I’m still on this journey but...

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Beta Quartet: Album Review

Posted by on Dec 1, 2017 in CD Reviews, December 2017, Featured, Issues, Reviews | 0 comments

Beta Quartet: Album Review

The award winning Beta Flute Quartet has released their first album! The quartet, newly formed in 2016, includes flutists Brittany Trotter, Eftihia Victoria Arkoudis, Tatiana Cassetta, and Alyssa Schwartz. They’ve won a number of prizes in their short time together including First Prize at the West Virginia Music Teachers National Association Chamber Music Competition, First Prize at the Flute Society of Kentucky Quartet Competition and they were semi-finalists in the 2017 Fischoff National Chamber Music Competition. Great accomplishments in their first year!! They’ve included some terrific quartet music in this album featuring composers Anze Rozman, Jennifer Higdon, Mark Fromm, Mike Mower, and Derek Charke. I enjoyed all the pieces – Rozman’s Aqua Ventus, which in the Aqua movement evokes running water beautifully; Higdon's Steeley Pause, a virtuosic, intensely difficult and exciting piece;  Mower's Dances of the Lake, a longer 3 movement piece which explores the entire range of the flute in colorful ways; Fictions, by Mike Mower, with four descriptive works- Whirlpool, Drought, Home Side and Flat Out; and Derek Charke’s meditative Raga Sept. The quartet plays each piece with dedication and finesse, deeply finding the essence of each piece in their interpretations. Each player is an accomplished, lovely player with great sound and solid technique, and together they create a unique, virtuosic album of quartets. Give it a listen!! --Barbara...

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Cathi Marro: Artist Interview

Posted by on Dec 1, 2017 in December 2017, Featured, Interviews, Issues | 0 comments

Cathi Marro: Artist Interview

Cathi Marro is a professional free-lance musician, educator and artist in Miami, FL. She specializes in flute and alto flute, playing in several ensembles ranging from classical symphony orchestras, to flute choirs, rock bands, sacred ensembles and even a performance art troupe, Kunstwaffen 1918. Daily Cat-Hi paintings are an important part of her day. What inspired you to start painting? My friend Pip Brant, an art professor at Florida International University, challenged me to draw one cat a week.  It sounded like a good idea but I didn’t do it right away.  A few months later I saw some paint on sale so I bought it.  Perhaps out of guilt for waiting so long to act on her suggestion I began painting a cat EVERY NIGHT! When did you paint your first cat? I’ve been painting these cats for over 3 years now. How many cats have you had in your life?  names? and a brief sentence about each. Spike and Jazz were my first two cats.  They were litter mates. Then Mufasa had to live with us since he got separated from his mommy somehow at a very young age. JP I adopted from The Cat Network (an organization for which I volunteer and donate art and $) 18 years ago.  He still lives with me.  Scooter was found under a copy machine at my Sunday AM gig, but had to be re-homed to another flute friend’s house 12 years later. My tortoise shell, CC came with my husband and much tortitude (yes it’s a real thing!!)  My baby INKY is my gorgeous black house panther. Does your cat enjoy your practicing? CC used to love music.  She was even seen crawling into my lap while I played piccolo!  The others all tolerate my playing except JP who can’t stand high notes.  He cries and cries when I play piccolo or when my students or I play the upper range of our flutes. I love your cat pin!   Where can we get more of these? Thanks.  If you see me at a flute convention I might have some on me or try my website www.cat-hi.com I now have a couple different pin designs as well as T shirts, pillows, baby onesies, prints and original paintings. Where did you study, with whom, and what are you up to? Growing up in the Greater Boston Area, I was fortunate to study with Laura Heiss (daughter of composer John Heiss) as a child.  I went on to earn a Bachelor of Music in flute performance.  My husband surprised me a couple years ago with a bunch of Skype lessons with Robert Dick! These days I am a freelance musician.  I play in a couple orchestras and several flute choirs as well as chamber ensembles.  I teach private lessons in Miami.  My favourite things these days are working and performing with local singer-songwriter Maria Murawka and my newest adventure Kunstwaffen 1918 which is an extremely creative performance art...

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