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Your Career Starts NOW! Interview with DMA student, Jeiran Hasan

Posted by on Feb 1, 2018 in Articles, Featured, February 2018, Interviews, Issues | 0 comments

Your Career Starts NOW! Interview with DMA student, Jeiran Hasan

7 Tips to Jumpstart Your Career While in School Jeiran Hasan, DMA student at University of Iowa   In today's musical landscape, transitioning from a student to a professional real world musician can be a challenge.  But it doesn't have to be!  I had the opportunity to sit down with 26 year old Jeiran Hasan, who is completing the last year of her DMA at the University of Iowa, and chat with her about her 7 tips to jumpstart your career while in school.  Having a varied skill set and always building on it is key for success while both in and out of school.  Here are Jeiran's tips:   1. Competitions Competitions are a great way to keep playing in front of a jury and also to work on recording and listening to yourself both in recorded and live rounds.  Do as many as possible, and don't get discouraged if you don't pass.  Playing for a varied group of jurors and peers is important, because you never know what connections can come from it in the future. It is also important for networking with the guest jurors and other flutists at the competition, and especially getting valuable feedback from the jurors.  Plus, the more competitions you do, the more repertoire you have learned, and then you have a wider variety you can program on a recital or concert.  Jeiran organizes all the competitions in a detailed Excel list, so she knows the deadlines, application fees, and repertoire list. Be as organized as possible, always!   2. Teaching Teaching is not only a great source of income (hello, competition application fees!), but it also builds experience working with a wide variety of ages and levels, as Jeiran does.  She teaches at a local senior center, a high school (where she conducts sectionals), and also privately.  The senior center was originally a temporary position through the university, but she really enjoyed it and kept it up because of her passion for teaching, and then some of the students wanted private lessons, so she is constantly building her studio through these outlets.  Of course, her love of teaching helps a lot!   3. Masterclasses Similar to teaching, Jeiran enjoys giving as many masterclasses as possible.  Starting regionally and reaching out to local teachers and colleagues at universities is a good way to start.  Her first real masterclass was at last year's NFA masterclass competition, where she was given 15 minutes with a student in front the public and a panel of professional flutists.  Of course, it was a valuable experience (and also ties into doing as many varied competitions as possible), and a good start to get confident giving masterclasses.  Jeiran recently was in her native countries of Azerbaijan and Russia, where she conducted masterclasses in their respective languages (WOW!), which forced herself to think differently in her teaching style.  It is important to keep as active as possible and get as much experience as you can.  And always keep updating your CV.   4. Research As a DMA student, a research and dissertation project is required, and Jeiran's project is quite interesting, as she incorporates her roots and family from Azerbaijan and Russia, and the music and composers of Azerbaijan, which are relatively unknown. (Amirov's "6 Songs" is the most...

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Juliette Hurel: Artist Interview

Posted by on Feb 1, 2018 in Featured, February 2018, Interviews, Issues | 0 comments

Juliette Hurel: Artist Interview

Juliette Hurel is known in both the French and the international music world as a famous flautist. She was unanimously awarded the first prize for flute and the first prize for chamber music at the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique in Paris and obtained prizes in different competitions such as those in Darmstadt, Kobé, Boekarest and the Jean-Pierre Rampal concours. In 2004 she was nominated for the “Discoveries of the year” in the “Victoires de la Musique Classique”. Juliette is in much demand for chamber music and then performs beside musicians such as Gary Hoffman, Youri Bashmet, Schlomo Mintz, Marielle Normann, Jean-Guihen Queras,Stephen Kovachevich and the Wanderer trio. As a soloist she can be regularly heard with l’Orchestre d’Auvergne, l’Orchestre de chambre de Toulouse, l’Orchestre de Bretagne, l’Orchestre de l’Opéra de Rouen, l’Orchestre Symphonique et Lyrique de Nancy, “Les Siècles” and the Tokyo Metropolitan Symphony Orchestra, as well as at well-known venues such as La Cité de la Musique, Grand Théâtre de Provence, la Roque d’Anthéron, les Folles Journées de Nantes, Festival de la Meije, Colmar, Auvers-sur-Oise and les Flâneries Musicales de Reims. Through her fondness for contemporary music she has had the opportunity to work with composers such as Pierre Boulez, Pascal Dusapin, Philippe Hersant and Eric Tanguy. Since 1998 Juliette has been solo flautist with Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra, first conducted by Valery Gergiev and since 2008 conducted by Yannick Nézet-Séguin. Juliette Hurel has made various recordings with pianist Hélène Couvert. The recordings which won prizes and were warmly received by the critics include : Martinu/Prokoviev (Lyrinx) ; French repertoire XXth century for (Naïve-Valois); Haydn Flute Sonatas (Zig-Zag Territoires). Further, she recorded the concertos for flute and orchestra by C.P.E. Bach with l’Orchestre d’Auvergne under the baton of Arie van Beek, “Impressions françaises” -works with piano by Debussy, Fauré, Poulenc-, both for Zig-Zag Territoires, Her album “Dawn of Romanticism" has been released in 2014 for Naïve. Her last CD is dedicated to the Mozart complete Flute Quartets with members of Quatuor Voce. This recording which appeared last June for AlphaClassics was also highly acclaimed and welcomed by the French and international press.   Can you give us 5 career highlights?   February 1998 : won the position at Rotterdam Philharmonic orchestra (20 years ago!!!) Each of my CD releases! Première of "Love songs," Mantovani concerto with Yannick Nézet Séguin and my orchestra (feb 2016) How about 3 pivotal moments that were essential to creating the artist that you've become?   Winning the position in Rotterdam gave me confidence and stopping having lessons allowed me to become really me! Working with great musicians as Hélène Couvert (pianist with whom I play for 25 years),Valery Gergiev,Yannick Nézet-Séguin who gave me (still give!) so much inspiration. What do you like best about performing?   I love the contact with the public! Teaching?   To hear the progress of the students! CD releases?   March:"Inspiration" JS Bach (alpha) Programme Bach (CD) Partita pour flûte seule BWV 1013 (10') Sonate en trio BWV 1038  (8') Suite n.2 BWV 1067 (19') Easter Oratorio, BWV 249:Seele, deine Spezereien (9’) (soprano,flute,orgue portatif,cello,contrebasse) Kaffee cantata BWV 211:Ei wie schmeckt  (4’30) (soprano,flute,clavecin,cello) Cantata, BWV 82a : "Ich habe genug" (7’30) (soprano,cordes,flute,clavecin) Matthäus-Passion BWV 244:Aus Liebe  (4'30) (soprano,flûte,cors anglais) What does your schedule look like for the next 6 months?   Of course, orchestra with great musicians (David Zinman,Truls Mork,Lahav Shani,our new conductor from next september) Concert in North of France with Hélène...

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How Your Flute Works. By Jeff Dening

Posted by on Feb 1, 2018 in Featured, February 2018, Flute Repair, Issues, Lifestyle | 0 comments

How Your Flute Works.  By Jeff Dening

Jeff Dening is the owner of Jeff’s Woodwind Shop in Baltimore, Maryland.  In addition to fixing flutes and piccolos for the fussiest of players, Jeff is preparing a series of repair classes for flute enthusiasts.  The series of classes will begin in the Baltimore/DC area in Spring and Summer 2018. The first sample class will be offered at the Mid-Atlantic Flute Convention in Reston, VA on February 18.  To contact Jeff, email repairs@woodwindfixer.com, www.woodwindfixer.com, or visit the Woodwindfixer page on Facebook.   How Did We Get to Here?   Part of understanding how your flute works is understanding the basic development and evolution of the flute as an instrument.  The details of the flute’s development over the centuries has filled many volumes with scores of inventive craftsmen and innovative flutists contributing to the evolution of the instrument.  However, I believe the simplest road map of how we got to the 21st century instrument we know can be drawn using the contributions of only 3 people. Boehm’s Instrument   Flutes in the 18th and early 19th centuries were what we refer to today as “simple system”: essentially 6 holes to be covered by the fingers and anywhere from 1 to 11 keys for chromatic notes and the foot joint.  With the exception of keys for the lowest notes on the foot, all of the additional keys were designed as “push to open”.  The bore of the head is cylindrical and the bore of the body is conical, tapering smaller towards the foot end. In the early 1800’s Theobald Boehm was a noted flute performer, composer, and instrument maker in Munich.  He was well known in flute circles on the continent and in 1830 Boehm traveled to England to perform a series of recitals.  While there, he had the opportunity to hear Charles Nicholson play.  Boehm was incredibly impressed.  The flute virtuoso Nicholson was known not only for his technical prowess, but also for his enormous and unparalleled sound.  Charles Nicholson was known to play on instruments specifically modified to his specifications.  The most notable feature of Nicholson’s flutes was that the finger holes were profoundly enlarged. Even experienced players know the finger span of a “normal” simple system flute is large and it can be challenging to keep the holes covered. Now make the holes even bigger and it becomes easy to see why it was difficult for many players to duplicate Nicholson’s results. In 1830 Boehm was making flutes of the highest quality with his partner Rudolf Greve, but none of Boehm’s instruments could match what he heard Nicholson display in London.  Boehm the businessman envisioned this sort of sound to be where things were going, but Boehm the flute maker knew that the Nicholson modifications had reached the limit of how large of a hole could be covered by a finger.  He endeavored to create a new flute capable of being played by human hands while duplicating or improving upon the Nicholson sound.  Boehm revolutionized and recreated the flute. This flute was completed in 1832 and is known as Boehm’s 1832 Model. Boehm’s 1832 model retained the body style of the previous simple system flutes with a cylindrical bore in the head and a conical bore in the body.  In order to get more sound out of the...

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Keeping Long Tones Fresh. by Francesca Arnone

Posted by on Feb 1, 2018 in Articles, Essays, Featured, February 2018, Issues | 0 comments

Keeping Long Tones Fresh.  by Francesca Arnone

Dr. Francesca Arnone has been featured as a flute and piccolo soloist, chamber musician, orchestral musician, and educator in the US and abroad. For the past 25 years, she has held Principal Flute, Second Flute, and Piccolo positions in the US and Mexico, and this season is performing with the Naples Philharmonic, Sarasota Orchestra, Palm Beach Opera, Opera Tampa, and the Atlantic Classical Orchestra, among others. She has taught at Boise State, West Virginia, and Baylor universities as well as many summer festivals and camps. In addition to her experience reviewing undergraduate through doctoral admission applications and auditions, she has regional, national, and international competition adjudication experience in addition to years of serving on professional orchestral audition and teaching position committees. She’s been a concerto soloist on flute, alto flute, and piccolo, on repertoire ranging from Bach to Chen Yi. Her recordings on MSR and PARMA have met with critical acclaim. See www.francescaarnone.com.   How do we keep our favorite exercises - our go-to, tried-and-true, most comfortable and comfort-offering routines - alive, useful, invigorating, sustaining (look, Ma - no thesaurus - yet!)? In other words, fresh and not dying on the vine. This question can apply to so many things...we like our creature comforts, our "things" and habits that help us feel more secure and safer, especially when we face the day's uncertainties. For musicians, this is an especially  interesting question to pose, as we like our confidence-inducing activities to remain skill-building, yet sometimes we wander into the desert of automatic pilot/self-driving cars/phoning things in/just basically not really being present. . . While a college undergrad, I remember walking up to the practice room building's top floor (since this is where my favorite rooms were located) for each day's first practice session, wondering what exactly kind of tone day it was going to be. Tone is everything to a flute player (and to all musicians, right?!) - it's the ears to the soul, the personal calling card of an individual. It's a big deal. So, sometimes my heart would pound as I unzipped my bag, unlatched the case to my flute...was it going to be a good tone day? A not so great one? A fabulous one? And what to do about it? Here's an average mental exchange from back then: "Yesterday was a pretty good tone day - I'd better start with EXACTLY the same long-tone exercise on EXACTLY the same pitch as I did yesterday." Naturally, sometimes that approach would work, and of course, sometimes that would not. Now that I refuse to play Eight Ball with my sound or my playing (!) I celebrate the wisdom of balancing exercises and knowing what I need to do to keep things fresh: be creative, participate, experiment, and play. So I'm attacking the much-revered exercise, the long tone. What exactly is this important component of a wind player's practicing? Long tones are generally exactly what their name implies:  sustained pitches, under which we play a smooth crescendo and decrescendo, to help us focus on the beginning, development, and release of the tone.  Here's a good explanation by a horn expert, Bruce Hembd, including the key of developing the right mindset to practice these particular exercises effectively, as well as the importance of changing things up (that's our fresh-picked ingredient!)....

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Practice Like a Pro. By Dr. Terri Sánchez

Posted by on Feb 1, 2018 in Blog, Featured, February 2018, Issues | 0 comments

Practice Like a Pro.  By Dr. Terri Sánchez

Terri Sánchez is currently the Senior Lecturer in Flute at the University of Texas at Arlington and a Miyazawa Performing Artist. Legendary flutist Paula Robison writes, “Sánchez has a beautiful presence as a player, and her sparkling clear sound spins out and fills the air with poetry.” After Sánchez premiered his new work for flute and piano, Archetypes, composer George Chave wrote, “her ability to pull the audience in and take them along for the ride is a true joy. Terri is a musician’s musician.” She performs often as a duo with her husband, pianist Gabriel Sánchez, and also as a member of the Tessitura Trio and FlutAria! Sánchez’s new book, The Aspiring Flutist’s Practice Companion, is scheduled for release in early 2017, published by Carolyn Nussbaum Music Co.   Sánchez is the founder, faculty advisor, and artistic director of the Maverick Flute Choir, a unique flute ensemble, comprised of UTA flutists, that seeks to engage and inspire audiences with an unconventional fusion of classic, contemporary, original, and collaborative musical works, often fused with a wide variety of other artistic mediums. With her guidance, the Maverick Flute Choir has written and performed two original collaborative works for flute ensemble, Take a Chance and As the Fog Descends Upon Us. In 2016, they premiered their original production, The Princess & The Dragon: A Musical Play for Flute Choir, with music and plot composed by Maverick Flute Choir members and script written by Terri Sánchez. Do You Practice Like a Pro?   Quiz from theself-inspiredflutist.com Answer the following questions and find out! Keep track of your answers so you can read your results at the end of the quiz. Before you take the quiz, would you take a couple of minutes to donate to the Maverick Flute Choir GoFundMe Campaign? Thanks!   1. How often you look forward to practicing? a. Always b. Most of the time c. Sometimes d. Not often 2. How often do you practice? a. Every day b. Almost every day c. A few times a week d. Every once in a while 3. How often do you procrastinate practicing? a. Never b. Every once in a while c. Pretty often d. When do I not procrastinate practicing? 4. How high is practicing on your priority list? a. Very high b. Important c. Pretty important d. I practice after all my other to-dos are done 5. How productive does your practice feel? a. Extremely productive b. Often productive c. Occasionally productive d. I really struggle with productive practice 6. Which of the following most resembles your mood during a typical practice session? a. Calm, clear, focused, and often inspired b. Serious c. Casual d. Frustrated 7. How often do you take breaks while practicing? a. I take little breaks often and bigger breaks as needed b. I stay very focused and seldom take breaks c. I feel like I don't have time to take breaks d. If I need a break, I just decide to practice later 8. What is the pace of your practicing generally like? a. Easy, but flowing b. Pushing forward c. Sometimes fast, sometimes slow d. Often hurried or frantic 9.  How confident do you feel in your ability to solve practice challenges? a. Very confident b. Pretty confident c. Somewhat confident d. Insecure 10. How often do you experience anxiety during a...

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Zara Lawler and The Flute on its Feet: Concert Review

Posted by on Feb 1, 2018 in Concert Reviews, Featured, February 2018, Issues, Reviews | 0 comments

Zara Lawler and The Flute on its Feet: Concert Review

On Sunday December 3rd, interdisciplinary flutist extraordinaire Zara Lawler welcomed us to her workshop/concert presented by the NY Flute Club at Mannes College's Glass Box performance space in NYC. Lawler’s mission is to explore and celebrate the interconnectedness of life and human experience through her performances that integrate music, dance, theater, and storytelling. She offered this workshop/concert as a way to reveal the craft behind her style and to bring us into the process along the way. The concert introduced us to a new work in progress by composer Jessica Meyer, to Fadoul and Lawler’s Dust Jacket, based on the blurbs inside flaps of books and their hilarious take on modern consumer culture as well as collaborative works with choreographer Neil Parsons – TimeFrame, and Berio’s Sequenza and Fantasies take on Telemann Fantasia’s. The performances were amazing- opening us up to new ideas, and stretching our conception of classical and new music performance; they are virtuosic and they also make us laugh. Often flute concerts have a vaguely repetitious feeling...I mean, how many times can we hear the same repertoire over and over?—(a lot I’m guessing). But, in “The Flute on its Feet,” Lawler shows us another approach to standard repertoire and new music, one that expands the possibilities of performance and communication if we are willing to try. And so, in the workshop section of the event, we got to try too. We paired off with our neighbors and experienced the trust needed to lean into each other (and then play the flute), and we created riffs based on physical movements- like Zara does in a number of pieces. We were asked to stretch ourselves a bit beyond our comfort zones, and for some it was a challenging but also fun request! As always, Zara played beautifully, even as she moved strenuously. It was a virtuosic and inspiring performance in so many ways.  If you have a chance, try and see her soon. The Flute on its Feet with Zara Lawler   A workshop/concert featuring: Zara Lawler, flute Paul Fadoul, percussion Jessica Meyer, composer Choreography by Neil Parsons and Melissa Riker www.zaralawler.com --Barbara...

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Jocelyn Aubrun: Album Review

Posted by on Feb 1, 2018 in CD Reviews, Featured, February 2018, Issues, Reviews | 0 comments

Jocelyn Aubrun: Album Review

1943 Works for Flute and Piano, Jocelyn Aubrun flute, and Aline Piboule piano. While WWII was raging, people were fighting and scattering throughout the world, composers were still writing beautiful works for flute and piano. This album features works by five composers, two major repertoire pieces, and three lesser known works all written in 1943. They are exquisitely played by Jocelyn Aubrun and his excellent partner Aline Piboule. Aubrun has been principal flutist with the Orchestre National de Lyon since 2006 and has had many concerto and chamber music performances worldwide. He plays with a beautiful, focused tone, outstanding accuracy, perfect articulation, and a clear love of the music he is performing. Aubrun is a lovely player, musical, and a perfect accompanist. Even the Piboule is an accomplished soloist herself. They are a unified team, perfectly matched in style and interpretation. The major repertoire works on the album are the Prokofiev Sonata and the Dutilleux Sonatine, and the lesser known works are Sonata da Camera by Marius Flothuis (1914-2001), Sonatine by Claude Arrieu (1903-1990), and Sonata by Leo Smit (1900-1943). All three of these pieces would make an excellent addition to our standard repertoire; they are idiomatic and mostly reflect the influence of 20th century French style, whether Milhaud and Honegger, or in early genre of electroacoustic music with Musique Concrete. I especially enjoyed the Sonata by Leo Smit, whose life was cut short when he died at Sobibor Camp in 1943 (shortly after finishing this Sonata). Give a listen to this well curated and very thought- provoking album. Available on Artalinna Label www.jocelynaubrun.fr --Barbara...

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Dr. G’s February Flute Horoscopes

Posted by on Feb 1, 2018 in Dr. G's Flute Horoscopes, Featured, February 2018, Issues | 0 comments

Dr. G’s February Flute Horoscopes

February begins with title wave of residual energy from the lunar eclipse in Leo that occurred on the last day of January. Everyone will be reinventing a different part of their lives this month. Pay attention to the cues that come to you from the Universe during the first half of the month. The second half of February begins with a solar eclipse in Aquarius on February 15th. This will activate the opposite house from the lunar eclipse last month. You will be experiencing new beginnings in another part of your life. It is time to end things that no longer work for you to make room for new things that will bring joy into your life and strengthen your flute playing. Use these two energies in February to focus on one area of your life at a time to avoid burnout. Change is never easy. Start by making small, yet impactful, changes to your daily routine. Make the old new again in February and do not be afraid to reinvent your life. Aquarius (January 20-February 18) HAPPY BIRTHDAY! This is your month, Aquarius, as many of the planets will be dancing around in your 1st house of who you are in the world. Venus is encouraging you to bring peace and beauty into your life (warm up with beautiful, slow movements from Mozart Concerti or Bach Sonatas) while Mercury, also in your 1st house for the first 18 days of the month, will be asking you to think about how you wish to present yourself this year. Do you wish to change your appearance in some drastic way? Dyeing your hair red this month, perhaps? Make sure your new color will be just as flattering on stage. Perhaps you will also be inspired to dress more professionally in your daily life. You never know when an opportunity may arise to make a great first impression. On the last day of January there was a lunar eclipse in your 7th house of relationships, daring you to reexamine the connections you have with other people. This is a good opportunity to end relationships that no longer serve you to make way for new friends that support the new you. This could mean starting new chamber groups with other musicians that you truly respect or simply playing duets more often with your fellow flutists. On February 11th Venus will be moving into your 2nd house of income, followed by Mercury on February 18th, and the Sun on February 19th. You may be getting an unexpected financial gift and/or spending your money on something that you enjoy (watch out, Flute World – Aquarians will be having some serious retail therapy mid-month). What was that fun flute accessory that you saw at the last NFA convention? Buy it! You will also be examining your unique talents and considering how you may use these skills to create a new business. If you haven’t uploaded any videos of your playing to YouTube yet, this is a good time to begin your channel. Reinvent yourself on February 15th when the solar eclipse in your sign encourages you to create new beginnings in your life. Are you ready to learn a 2nd instrument? Prepare a recital full of music that you do not usually explore. Doors are...

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Flute Poem by Delancey Trimble (10 yrs old)

Posted by on Feb 1, 2018 in Featured, February 2018, Issues | 0 comments

Flute Poem by Delancey Trimble (10 yrs old)

Carnegie Hall, Delancey Trimble (10 yrs old) The place where true magic happens. Where is your finger tip-tappings On the elevator door Straining you while you go down slowly, And hold your flute in hand, Waiting after the next band. When you walk on stage your heart skips a beat And you keep tune with the tapping of your feet You’re HERE and that’s all that...

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The Gonjiam Flute Festival

Posted by on Jan 2, 2018 in Featured, Interviews, Issues, January 2018 | 0 comments

The Gonjiam Flute Festival

Interview: Soohyun Paik   Can you talk about the purpose of GMF?   We are welcoming the 3rd Gonjiam Flute Festival in February 2018 at the same time the XXIII PyeongChang Olympic Winter Games will be held in Korea.   The main philosophy of Gonjiam Music Festival is making heritage in music. It is not only for the glory of the world’s top artists. There are respectable artists who are legendary flutists and amazing young artists who are flying over to be part of the best flute festival in Korea. We are very proud of all the splendid artists from the past, present, and future who gather at the same time and at the same place to make our heritage and legacy in flute and music.   Gonjiam Flute Festival is not only a big flute festival all of the flute world's stars participate in. It is a collaboration of the world's top artists to learn about the lives and dreams of the next generation of artists and create a future through music. Music is an inspiration, and it enriches our lives and all others thereafter. As musicians we wish to share our role and our value, made together.   Gonjiam Music Festival also believes in serving our community, so we are donating funds towards cancer treatment and research at Seoul National University Hospital and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) for the treatment and research of juvenile diabetes.   What kinds of difficulties did you experience when working on the festival? Do you have some fun stories to share?    As a matter of fact, the process of preparing for this big festival was not easy at all even though GMF has the best team. There are two directors, a chief operations officer, a project manager and 10-15 staff members plus our agency BomArts, who is organizing the gala concert at Seoul Arts Center. Personally, I cannot forget the episode we had with the Sir James Galway Flute Festival on our first day of the camp. We realized we had made a huge mistake 30 minutes before masterclasses were supposed to start. The room arrangements were not ready at all for holding all the masterclasses. It was really hectic, and we spent much of our time just pointlessly blaming each other. We were only amateurs then, we still believe we are, but every year we are more becoming relaxed and able to solve problems without things getting hectic because things are always happening all over the place .   Our internal communication mostly goes through Messenger. You can find everything in our company chatroom from business to personal matters, jokes, fights, musical issues. We sometimes have up to a hundred messages per day. Sometimes we joke that if we ever publish a book about our festival, we should just fill it with our online chats. We’re sure it would make us a fortune and be more famous than the festival itself Philipp and I always say that we are so happy to have Charles and Ilkoo to mediate things between us, as we have different opinions quite often. Usually our big fights are about small things like poster design. We hope to share these hilarious memories from the history of GMF someday.   Special point?   Many people ask what makes us special. We believe it...

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