Issues

Gemeinhardt: Flute Maker Spotlight

Posted by on May 2, 2018 in Blog, Featured, Issues, May 2018 | 0 comments

Gemeinhardt: Flute Maker Spotlight

Can you give a little history about the company, from where it began to where it is now, and the future? Founded by Kurt Gemeinhardt, a 4th generation flute-maker from Markneukirchen, Germany, the Gemeinhardt company was established in 1948 in Elkhart, IN, 20 years after Gemeinhardt’s immigration to the United States. Initially crafting only very fine hand made flutes for professionals, the company expanded in 1952 to produce all levels of silver flutes. Beginner student flutes were developed at this time as well. It was these flutes that eventually became the bread and butter of the corporation as Gemeinhardt’s reputation for fine beginner flutes became a hallmark of the industry. Kurt's father had studied under Emil Rittershausen, who had been trained by Theobald Boehm, and so the instruments they produce can trace their lineage back to the creator of the Boehm system.[5] From 1993 to 2011, Gemeinhardt was owned by investment firms with the last changing the corporate name to Gemstone Musical Instruments. In June 2011 The assets of Gemeinhardt was acquired by Angel Industries Co. Ltd of Taiwan, a manufacturer of instruments and business partner of Gemeinhardt for several years. David Pirtle, president and CEO of Gemeinhardt, says that the acquisition by Angel Industries will allow Gemeinhardt more freedom to make decisions and run production in order to best serve the market.[3] While many musical instrument brands are made overseas, the partnership between Gemeinhardt and Angel Industries is unique. Gemeinhardt manufactures and supplies many of the flute components (headjoint, body, footjoint, keys) from Elkhart, Indiana USA then sends them to Angel Industries to assemble them. They are then returned to Elkhart, Indiana for testing and adjusting in the Gemeinhardt workshop. David Pirtle, president and CEO of Gemeinhardt, asserts that this is because the parts can be made better in the Gemeinhardt workshop in America. This differs from most brands, which have their flute components manufactured overseas.[3] In 2014 the Gemeinhardt Company introduced a new line of flutes named "The Kurt Gemeinhardt Generation Series" at the National Flute Association's annual convention in Chicago.[8] Consisting of entirely American-made conservatory and professional flutes. These flutes utilize the RS2012 Scale invented by Trevor Wye, William Bennett, and Eldred Spell. In 1997, Gemeinhardt acquired the Roy Seaman Piccolo Company. In order to be sure the quality and process developed by Roy remained intact employees from Elkhart spent many months in Arizona working with Roy and all of Roy’s original equipment was acquired by Gemeinhardt. In addition to flutes and piccolos, Gemeinhardt also has a line of saxophones and clarinets. Products Flutes The Gemeinhardt company sells their flutes in different categories: Student, Conservatory, Professional, Kurt Gemeinhardt Generation Series (American made conservatory and professional flutes) Alto flutes, Bass Flutes, and they also sell headjoints separately. Gemeinhardt models [12] Student Flutes: Model 1SP Flute / Model 2SP Flute / Model 2BLK Flute Conservatory Flutes: Model 2SH Flute / Model 3B Flute / Model 3SHB Flute / Model 3SB Flute Professional Flutes: Model 33SHB Flute / Model 33SB Flute / Model 33SSB Flute / Ali Ryerson Autograph Series Flute Kurt Gemeinhardt Generation Series Flutes: The "Blue" Model Flute / The "White" Model Flute / The "Red" Model Flute / The "Revolution" Model Flute Alto Flutes: Model 11A-BLK Alto Flute / Model 11A Alto Flute / Model 11ASH Alto Flute / Ali Ryerson Artists' Series BLK Alto...

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Rozalind MacPhail: Artist Interview

Posted by on May 2, 2018 in Entrepreneurship, Featured, Interviews, Issues, May 2018 | 0 comments

Rozalind MacPhail: Artist Interview

Innovative Gemeinhardt Artist/Clinician, Rozalind MacPhail recently took home an ECMA for Electronic Recording of the Year and MusicNL’s Female Artist of the Year. One of the world’s leaders in flute looping and live film scoring, this classically-trained flutist blends effected flute, electronics, voice, omnichord, field recordings and silent film through Ableton Live. MacPhail creates music for film and live performance and has released several albums of original work. She explores new ways to combine image and sound, in works that speak honestly of place, person and the human experience. MacPhail is the first-ever Canadian artist sponsored by the Gemeinhardt family, one of the music industry’s largest exclusive manufacturer of flutes and piccolos. Gemeinhardt President & CEO, David Pirtle says, ”Gemeinhardt is thrilled to sponsor the creative artistry of Canada’s looping flutist, Rozalind MacPhail. She is a dynamic and gifted performer who inspires through her lively audio-visual performances and interactive music workshops.” You call yourself a Flute Looper; what exactly is that? What is your process on creating flute loops, and how do you use them, both live and recorded?     I can’t remember who gave me that nickname first but it has stuck with me over the years. I’ve also been called “Mystery Flute Girl” and “Flutegirl”. I guess I’ve always stood out in the indie music scene as being a bit different and that was the easiest way for folks to recognize me. As a live looping artist, I play melodies, rhythms and harmonies on the flute that get layered into creating a wall of sound, kind of like a one person band. I loop through a digital audio workstation called Ableton Live which is a popular software music sequencer used by electronic music producers. In addition to the flute, I incorporate the voice, guitar, omnichord, field recordings, synthesizer and loads of electronics into my music which I record and program through the wonderful world of MIDI. I often create a bed of electronics in which I can loop to. It’s kind of like my duet partner on the stage. I add a visual element by combining my electroacoustic music to silent film. There’s a magical dance that happens between live music and film which I love. Live looping is quite popular these days in the electronic world and with solo touring singer-songwriters. It gives the musician a way to create the full sound of a band or chamber music ensemble by layering various melodies, harmonies and grooves one by one until you have a full wall of sound. Looped music is present in a lot of film scores, video games and minimalist music. I was inspired to start looping after watching various live looping performers in the Canadian indie music scene. My first introduction was watching singer-songwriter, Craig Cardiff create the sound of a noisy bar scene with his looping pedal and how it captivated his audience in a way I’ve never witnessed before. Then I got to see singer-songwriter, Danny Michel wow his audiences looping effected electric guitar. But the real game changer for me was when I saw Owen Pallett loop his violin live at Osheaga Festival in Montreal. That was it. I thought to myself, “If he can do this on violin, I can do this on flute.” This was in the early...

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Rozalind MacPhail’s 15 Healthy Habits on the Road

Posted by on May 2, 2018 in Featured, Health & Wellness, Issues, Lifestyle, May 2018 | 0 comments

Rozalind MacPhail’s 15 Healthy Habits on the Road

1. Juice half a lemon with a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar and a teaspoon of unpasteurized honey and mix into a big warm glass of water. Drink on an empty stomach daily when you first wake up. 2. Meditate for 15 minutes upon waking up and before going to bed. This helps to clear your head and make for a more restful sleep. 3. 25 minutes of exercise every day, whether it’s yoga, a walk in nature, a brisk jog or a relaxing swim in the pool. Don’t forget to pack a yoga mat for the road! I’ve practiced yoga poses in the airport when there’s been a delays and it make waiting so much easier. It also adds great cushioning for my electronic equipment. 4. Add Emergen-C packets to your water bottle and drink more water than you think you need! 5. Write in a journal daily to unload any stress from the day. It can also be a great way to remember all of the magical moments we’re experiencing on the road. 6. Bring loads of healthy snacks! I pack raw veggies and fresh fruit, rice crackers with hummus, raw nuts and seeds and homemade vegan treats if I have a place to store them. I try to avoid anything that will make me feel bloated. Dark chocolate is la lovely treat. 7. I can’t live without my blender! I love making homemade almond milk and smoothies to get in some extra veggies while I’m on the road. This is hard to do when flying though. When heading to a new town, I look for places where I can buy fresh green juice and homemade nut milks. I always look for the healthy food store to see what treasures I can find. I always buy local whenever possible. 8. Add a mindfulness app to your phone as a reminder to relax and release when things get stressful. 9. Bring an inspiring book that you can get totally lost in. 10. Buy postcards on the road and write love notes to all the people you are grateful to have in your life. Sometimes just writing about things we’re grateful for can totally turn our day around. 11. I like to add liquid chlorophyll to my water bottle throughout the day. It builds the immune system, cleanses the blood and keeps bad body odour away. 12. I bring oil of oregano and put a couple drops underneath my tongue with a big glass of water when I’m feeling run down. 13. I love my neti pot! Keeps the sniffles away and cleans any dust and mould out of our sinus cavities. Great for allergies and congestion from flying. 14. Packing my favourite caffeine-free tea helps me avoid the urge for coffee when I’m feeling tired. 15. I always pack my favourite soap. That way, wherever I am, I always have something from...

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How Your Flute Works (Part 2). by Jeff Dening

Posted by on May 2, 2018 in Articles, Essays, Featured, Flute Repair, Issues, Lifestyle, May 2018 | 0 comments

How Your Flute Works (Part 2). by Jeff Dening

Part 2: Use Your Words   Imagine a young student is asked to name a particular note on their music and instead of saying, “F#”, they hold up the instrument and show the fingering.  Every teacher has run into this. Every repair technician has run into this as well with customers of all ages and experience levels.  A client has a problem with their flute but chooses to point to the area rather than risk using the wrong terminology and be thought of poorly.  Do not fret or feel self conscious if you have done this.  How could technicians think poorly of you?  You are paying us! Where the “point and grunt” method does become a challenge and occasionally problematic is in seeking a diagnosis or estimate over the phone.  For example, using the correct terminology for pad vs. bumper can be the difference between a $200 repair and a $20 repair and needing to schedule a large block of time compared to handling it while waiting for a fresh cup of coffee to cool a little. Using the correct terminology in identifying parts of your flute can not only be handy for trivia night, but is essential to learning more about how your flute works.  It addition, using the correct terms can also bring a smile to the face of your curmudgeonly technician. Nomenclature and Terminology   There are inevitable differences in terminology between repairers, makers, and scholars based on region or tradition.  I will list common alternate names for various parts where there could be confusion or possible duplication of terms.  See figures 1 and 2 for the names of the general body components of the flute.     Types and Parts of Keys (Fig. 3)   The cylindrical rods that are arranged throughout the flute are referred to as the hinges.  These could be solid or hollow in construction.  Extending from the hinges are the key arms. The key arms connect to the pad cups.  The pad cups, as their name suggests, hold and support the pads.  In general parlance pad cups are often just referred to as keys.  Occasionally it is necessary to be more specific when referring to specific parts of the keys.   One feature in keys that gets disproportionate weight in marketing is the type of arm connecting the pad cup to the hinge.  The two general types are known as Y-arms and French arms (or French keys).  Y-arms are arms that connect to the rim of the pad cup.  French arms are connected to the pad cup through a spine that connects across the top of the key.  These two designs do not indicate inherent quality.  What type of arm is a decision made on the fabrication level of the instrument.  Most student level instruments have Y-arms because they are easier to mass produce.  This does not mean that a flute with Y-arms throughout is automatically a lower quality instrument.  Details concerning clutches and the Brögger style mechanism will be covered in a future article.   Names of Keys (Fig. 4, 5, & 6)   The common rationale for naming keys is as you add fingers to the flute, the note that comes  out is the name of the key pressed.  There are some keys that are pressed indirectly.   Indirectly...

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Catherine Ramirez: Album Review

Posted by on May 2, 2018 in CD Reviews, Featured, Issues, May 2018, Reviews | 0 comments

Catherine Ramirez: Album Review

Catherine Ramirez - Shelter from the Storm, Albany Records TROY1701 Catherine Ramirez, currently artist-in-residence at St. Olaf College in Minnesota, presents this album “as a bridge toward empathy, compassion, and even understanding” for negative feelings of fear or frustration. She has assembled an album of solo flute works from a variety of stylistic eras that tie into her theme of artists working through feelings of anguish, sadness, burden, and frustration. The fact that each of these works is for solo flute allows Ramirez to fully showcase her lovely sound. Her highly-polished technique serves her well and results in musically convincing interpretations. My favorite track on this album is the transcription by Kazuo Tokito of the Chaconne from J.S. Bach’s Violin Partita No. 2 in D Minor, BWV 1004. Ramirez’s interpretation is beautiful, wellpaced, and thoughtful. Ramirez writes, “Believed to have been written after the death of his wife Maria Barbara, Bach seems to have worked through his grief in the writing of the Chaconne. In my interpretation … the music traverses the entire range of emotions and mental states:  sadness, tenderness, questioning, forced optimism.” This range is clearly presented in Ramirez’s convincing performance; it is a strong ending to an album full of well-presented, sensitively-performed works. Air - Toru Takemitsu Sonata “Appassionata” in F-Sharp Minor for Flute Alone, Op. 140 - Sigfried Karg-Elert Cinq Incantations for Solo Flute - André Jolivet Pour acceuillir les négociateurs, et que l’entrevue soit pacifique Pour que l’enfant qui va naître soit un fils Pour que la moisson soit riche qui naîtra des sillons que le laboureur trace Pour une communion sereine de l’être avec le monde Aux funérailles du chef, pour obtenir la protection de son âme Violin Partita in D Minor, BWV 1004 - J.S. Bach, trans. Kazuo Tokito --Tammy Evans...

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Nicole Esposito: Concert Review

Posted by on May 2, 2018 in Concert Reviews, Featured, Issues, May 2018, Reviews | 0 comments

Nicole Esposito: Concert Review

As the Flute Professor at the University of Iowa, the artistic and personal success of my students is always my first priority.  However, I find it also extremely important and do my best to set the best professional standard for them and I work hard to maintain my own playing at the highest level.  Professors are tasked with many things other than teaching and particularly the spring semester is heavy on both student and faculty committee work. It would be quite easy to let my performing ambitions fall by the wayside, however each semester I aim to learn a new recital program to perform at the university.  I try to learn completely new pieces that I have not previously performed as I do not want to rely on the comforts of playing overly familiar repertoire.  Often they may be pieces I have loved for a long time and have not had the chance to program, but I also try to perform new compositions, written in the 21st century.  The Sonata for Flute and Piano by Mel Bonis was perhaps the most standard piece on the program that I just have not had the chance to play until now.  I recently heard the quite substantial Sonata by Max Meyer-Olbersleben and thought it would be both a challenge and reward to perform.  The Sonata for Flute and Piano by Mario Pilati I have also wanted to play since I heard it a few years ago and it fit nicely on this program.  The Rire de Saraï by Connesson is a brilliant piece which was suggested to me by French flutist Julien Beaudiment.  I feel that it is definitely a piece that suits me well, with it's hauntingly lyrical lines and fiery rhythmic drive.  --Nicole Esposito, flute professor, University of Iowa. On April 4, at the University of Iowa, I had the pleasure of listening to an entire program of flute music that I had never heard before.  While it looked like it was only 4 pieces, these works contained many movements, often with no time to breathe, however flutist Nicole Esposito pulled it off with flying colors.  Her always expressive tone shimmered through each of these relatively unknown gems for flute and piano, and pianist Aydin Arslan was equally proficient on the technically demanding piano accompaniment. The recital started off with Mel(anie) Bonis (1858-1937) Sonata, which was the most frequently played piece on the program.  Next was the Mario Pilati (1903-1938) Sonata.  I enjoyed hearing the influences of Debussy and Respighi in this beautiful watercolor of a piece.  While flutists wish we had more Romantic repertoire, Max Meyer-Olbersleben  (1850-1927) composed a sonata for flute and piano that fits right into the violin and piano dominated Romantic period.  Lastly, Rire de Sarai by Guillaume Connesson (b. 1970), was a piece that I think should be played much more!  It was fun, lyrical, technical, and rhythmic, all of which elements were all perfectly executed in Esposito's playing.  ...

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How to Stay in Good Flute Shape: Maxim Rubtsov’s “Three C’s”

Posted by on May 2, 2018 in Articles, Essays, Featured, Issues, May 2018 | 0 comments

How to Stay in Good Flute Shape: Maxim Rubtsov’s “Three C’s”

Maxim Rubtsov is principal flute of the Russian National Orchestra, leader of the RNO Wind Quintet, soloist, recording artist and flute teacher. I first met Maxim Rubtsov in the fall of 2010 when he was a featured performer for the University of Alabama’s Celebrity Series.  Since that time, we have performed together in various venues in the United States and Russia, most recently at the 2017 National Flute Association Convention in Minneapolis.  When I heard that Maxim would be giving his Carnegie Hall debut as a soloist on February 14, I immediately made plans to travel to New York City for an evening of “Russian Romance.” Maxim and pianist Sergei Kvitko delighted the Weill Recital Hall audience with a program by Vladimir Tsybin, Andrey Rubtsov (no relation but a former member of the RNO), Sergei Rachmaninoff, John Corigliano (who was in attendance), Mieczyslaw Weinberg, and a premiere of a new work by RNO conductor Mikhail Pletnev.  In addition, Maxim offered a bouquet of charming Russian miniatures, some of which were scores he found in the Russian Imperial Collection at the Library of Congress. As Maxim performed with effortless musicality, great vigor, and infectious personality, I found myself wanting to ask how he is able to maintain his artistic integrity and high level of performance with his grueling performance schedule.  Since 2000 Maxim has been Principal Flute of the Russian National Orchestra, an internationally renowned group that appears regularly throughout Europe, Asia, and the Americas, and he logs thousands of miles per year traveling with the orchestra in addition to his ventures as soloist in recital or with orchestras.  The day after his concert, I was able to ask this question, and it was clear that Maxim has explored this topic in great detail and was able to distill his response into “Three Cs,” outlined below in Maxim’s own words. As everyone knows, the best way to stay in shape is never to leave it. This quality is instilled in professional musicians from a young age. Over time, I developed a series of rules for myself and I stick to them even on vacation and during long trips. My way of life, consisting of constant tours and performance travel, really dictates special requirements for a practice schedule. First of all, nomadic living conditions do not always allow you to adhere to your practice schedule. But with the help of some consciousness exercises, you can quickly come to the first required condition for practice—calmness.  Just tune yourself in to the idea of practice. By doing this, every minute of seclusion can easily be used for the benefit of an upcoming performance or for learning new works, a process which often can be very difficult. The second important belief, which allows you successfully and quickly to focus on practice, is an internal sense of cheerfulness.  This cheerfulness comes from a love of playing the flute, or even from anticipation of playing the flute. If you consider playing the flute a pleasure, you will not have to persuade yourself to practice.  On the contrary, you will treasure every minute with your flute. And third, you need to learn concentration to calmly ignore all the little things around you, the suddenly distracting factors.  Always return to your studies, even if someone has distracted you....

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Dr. G’s May Flute Horoscopes

Posted by on May 2, 2018 in Dr. G's Flute Horoscopes, Featured, Issues, May 2018 | 0 comments

Dr. G’s May Flute Horoscopes

Welcome to May! Spring is in full bloom and Mercury retrograde is now so yesterday. The big news for the month is that Uranus is switching signs on May 16th from Aries to Taurus, where it will stay for the next 7 years. Uranus is the planet of technology and the unexpected. Some say that he is the trickster of the Universe, but I like to think of Uranus as the rebel punk. This planet likes to create its own rules and follow the unconventional path less taken. Wherever Uranus falls in your chart this month, use its energy to rethink new ways to better your life. Embrace technology during this transit and find creative ways to use your smartphone in your studio life. May is all about riviving what is old and embracing what is exciting and new. Time to start a revolution in your own life. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Happy Birthday! The month begins with Mars and Pluto joining Saturn in your 9th house of travel and long distance learning. You could be searching for ways to bring more meaning into your flute playing by either planning travel to summer masterclasses in Europe or by studying flute playing in another culture (Irish flute playing, Native American flute playing, etc.). Pluto will push you outside of your comfort zone. If there is a trip that you have wanted to take for a long time but have been intimidated by learning a new language or traveling so far away from home, Pluto will help you face your fears and take the first steps. Summer in Vienna, perhaps? Or maybe a trip to China or Japan to study Shakuhachi flute playing. Mars will help you make it happen. Mercury moves into your 1st house on May 14th, followed by a New Moon on May 15th. This is a fresh new start. You may have recently completed an important recital or performance and are finally ready to start thinking about your next project. Leave the past in the past no matter how good, bad, or ugly your performance was, thinking critically about what you can do to improve the next performance, and start planning. What pieces do you wish to program on your next recital? What composers to you wish to feature and in what order? Have you received your parts for the next orchestra concert? Time to get cracking on these new pieces. Buy a new concert outfit. You deserve it! Uranus is also moving into your sign on May 16th where it will stay for the next 7 years. You will be completely reinventing yourself in unexpected ways, possibly connected with technology. This is the perfect time to start a YouTube channel. Share your performances and ideas with the world! Mars moves into your 10th house of careers on May 17th, giving you a boost of energy to apply to new work opportunities or take a few auditions. Go for the gold, Taurus, and push yourself to do whatever it is in your career that scares you. On May 20th Venus moves into your 3rd house of communication. This is a great time to network. Chat up a few fellow flutists online and share some of your creative music-making ideas. The Sun moves into your 2nd house of...

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Gonjiam Flute Festival Report

Posted by on Apr 2, 2018 in April 2018, Blog, Featured, Issues | 0 comments

Gonjiam Flute Festival Report

This past February, The Flute View was invited to participate in the Gonjiam Festival. Below we’re sharing our own personal experiences of the festival. Barbara: I was so pleased when Philipp Jundt (whom we met at the Galway Flute Festival) invited us to both perform, teach and lecture at the festival!  My first time in Korea (and East Asia) was in 1988 when I went to Seoul with the NYC Symphony as part of the Olympic Arts Festival which was tied to the ’88 Olympics, so you can imagine my surprise and sense of irony when it seemed that I would be back in Korea again during their hosting of the Olympics. My father talked about the Olympics often while I was growing up as he was a teenager during the 1936 Olympics in Germany and ran the Olympic torch through his hometown (he was an athlete and Jewish), so some more irony and joy too. Back to the festival itself, I couldn’t wait to get there as I love Korea, the people, the food, the energy and this time didn’t disappoint. The trio was asked to perform on the opening concert at the Seoul Arts Center and decided that having a world premiere trio for flutes and orchestra would be a wonderful opportunity. We turned to composer Nicole Chamberlain (who was a winner of our composer’s competition) and asked her to write a new 5 minute trio for us to premiere in Korea!  It’s a wonderful piece, rhythmic, exciting, well orchestrated and fun to play, and includes, beat boxing, foot stomps and more.  The piece was conducted by charismatic Philipp Bernold, who conducted with preciseness, sensitivity and energy!!  We arrived several days early in Seoul to recover from jet lag staying in the lovely Shilla Hotel and immediately began rehearsing together since we live in separate cities and only had a few days. First rehearsal with the excellent orchestra (one of the best in Korea) was the next day and we met some of our esteemed colleagues including legendary Peter Lukas Graf, Henrik Wiese and Philipp Bernold. When not rehearsing or practicing, I did a lot of sleeping and eating these first few days!! The concert itself was thrilling, well attended, in the beautiful 2500 seat hall, and most importantly I heard and met the rest of the stellar cast of flutists attending the festival!! Hearing Anne-Catherine Heinzmann, Juliette Hurel, Sophie Cherrier, Henrik Wiese, Demarre McGill, Robert Dick, Peter Lukas Graf, Philipp Bernold, Philipp Jundt, Soohyun Paik, Sunghyun Cho, Seungho Lee, Rando Kim, Yerin Lee, Yunhwa Song, Ulkyoung Park was inspiring and exciting, so many beautiful players with their own unique styles.  In sharing all their names I want you to experience how many talented, musical artists where performing on the concert.  The Flute View trio was part of it and closed the concert!! The audience was very enthusiastic and we followed the Seoul tradition of appearing in the lobby right after the concert for congratulations and photos with the audience members, it was fun and fulfilled my dreams of being a rock star!! The next morning after a celebratory evening we blearily boarded buses to take us to Gonjiam Valley where the heart of the festival is held. The festival is located in a beautiful conference center...

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Master Classes and Lessons at the Gonjiam Festival. by Barbara Siesel

Posted by on Apr 2, 2018 in April 2018, Articles, Blog, Essays, Featured, Issues | 0 comments

Master Classes and Lessons at the Gonjiam Festival.  by Barbara Siesel

At the Gonjiam Music Festival, master teachers from around the world give open lessons to over 60 students attending the festival. I tried to attend as many of these classes as possible since I’d never heard any of these wonderful flutists and pedagogues teach before and I love learning from my colleagues. It was an enlightening experience as they all had so much to offer. Here are my summaries and favorite takeaways from the classes. Philipp Bernold, flutist and conductor: Philipp is the professor of chamber music and flute at the National Paris Conservatoire and a flute soloist and conductor extraordinaire! He beautifully conducted us in Nicole Chamberlain’s trio, Olympus for trio and orchestra, and played the Chaminade Concertino with verve and style between conducting each piece on the program- wow!!! Having had experience of his talent and artistry I wanted to attend the only class that he gave. He’s a marvelous teacher and worked on all aspects of flute with the students. The main points— Make sure you can play expressively without vibrato, thinking about your phrasing like speech, as some notes, like some words have special value. In a short time showing a shy student all manner of ways to play using the woods behind the window to create clear and colorful metaphors to improve her breathing strength, vibrato and phrasing. Bernold has a book-- La Technique d’Embouchure, 4th Edition, published by Billaudot, (available at Flute World) which are 218 exercises for mastery over our embouchure and creating a beautiful tone. He talked about the book in a discussion about using both your embouchure and your air, as he’s created exercises that allow one to develop both a good embouchure and a good, free blowing line with good support. I particularly loved his talk about free blowing the line, that a beginner blows free and loud and that, that impulse is the correct one, as the only energy we have is the air. We work with the diaphragm and the lips and the lips (a muscle) must be trained as well as the diaphragm muscle. My personal take away for my own playing and teaching: To sometimes blow loud and free, practice your scales loud and then spend time playing softer and working on your embouchure. I sometimes play too softly in order to stimulate my support and free my lips, but I found that the free blowing was quite helpful in opening up my sound. It’s another tool in my practice box!! Henrik Wiese Mozart Class: Henrik Wiese is the solo flutist in the Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks, Mariss Jansons chief conductor. A wonderful, exciting player! He also is involved with Mozart, Bach and Reinecke editions of both flute music and symphonic music and has written and made a study of Mozart Cadenza’s (among many other scholarly endeavors). In this class he spoke about Mozart flute music in general and also about Mozart Cadenza’s. The first part of the class was in English and it was illuminating! In answer to a question about Mozart articulation, Henrik doesn’t use traditional double tonguing (tktk) but suggests uses didle didle, so that the lines are more connected, like a singing. He also suggests using limited vibrato in Mozart, and to think about phrasing more, clearly in Mozart. My personal take-away:...

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